Tag Archives: panoramic

Vertical Panoramic Photographs of New York Churches by Richard Silver

Church of St. Vincent Ferrer

Richard Silver (previously) has a unique way of looking at architecture, building composite photographs from several images that seamlessly reveal a structure’s interior. His new series captures the insides of New York churches, and are perfectly timed for the Pope’s impending arrival on U.S. soil. These images are composed of 6-10 shots, forming a vertical panorama so cohesive that it might give you vertigo.

Although Silver has been to hundreds of churches during his career and many years of travel, it’s only recently that he figured out how to capture the expansive inner beauty of their architecture. “Finding the perfect location in the center aisle then shooting vertically from the pew to the back of the church gives the perspective that only architecture of this style can portray,” says Silver.

Church of St. Stephen / Church of St. Paul the Apostle

Silver was born and raised in New York and has visited 75 countries in his life, including 13 last year alone. His previous careers involved computer science, real estate, and a stint on Wall Street, but he embraced photography full-time in 2011. You can see more of his vertical church series on his Flickr page here.

Calvary Episcopal Church

Serbian Orthodox Cathedral of St. Sava / Church of the Village

Church of St. Francis Xavier

Vincent St. de Paul / Most Holy Redeemer Church

St. Monica’s Church

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A Multi-Camera 360° Panoramic Timelapse of the Stars by Vincent Brady


Michigan-based photographer Vincent Brady uses an elaborate 4-camera rig and lots of software to capture what he calls Planetary Panoramas. These are somewhat similar to the tiny planet videos we’ve seen the last few months, but the results are quite a bit more dramatic. He shares about his technique:

While experimenting with different photography tricks and techniques back in 2012, I was shooting 360 degree panoramas in the daytime and long exposures of the stars streaking in the sky at night. It suddenly became clear that the potential to combine the two techniques could be a trip! Since the Earth is rotating at a steady 1,040 mph I created a custom rig of 4 cameras with fisheye lenses to capture the entire night-sky in motion. Thus the images show the stars rotating around the north star as well as the effect of the southern pole as well and a 360 degree panorama of the scene on Earth. Each camera is doing nonstop long exposures, typically about 1 minute consecutively for the life of the camera battery. Usually about 3 hours. I then made a script to stitch all the thousands of these panoramas into this time-lapse.

You can learn more about how Brady makes these and see more of his photography over on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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The Disorienting Polyhedral Panoramic Perspective Drawings of Rorik Smith

Before an email arrived in my inbox this week I was completely unaware that a polyhedral panoramic perspective drawing was a thing, but apparently is, though a quick google search comes up with nothing. But I’ll take artist Rorik Smith at his word and just enjoy the incredible effects achieved in his disorienting illustrations that are drawn with graphite pencils on-site without aid from photographic reference material or digital manipulation. Smith seems to introduce polarized coordinates at random locations in each drawing and then bends the perspective of the surrounding areas to match. If that makes any sense. Love these. See much more in his portfoio.

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Yuri Winkelman

A lovely vertical panoramic shot of an electric tower entitled Necessary Sustenance by Dutch art director and photographer Yuri Winkelman. For more vertical panoramic goodness see also the first ever seamless photograph of an entire redwood tree.

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