Tag Archives: paper

Cybele Young’s Paper Sculptures Depict Everyday Objects Metamorphosing into Otherworldly Creatures

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I Thought They Worked Better. Paper. 33 x 28 x 2.5 in.

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I Thought They Worked Better. Detail.

A pair of yellow headphones. A violin case. A set of keys. All miniature objects faithfully crafted from Japanese papers by Toronto-based artist Cybele Young, any one of which would be considered striking in its own right, but she doesn’t stop there. Each object, however mundane, is displayed step-by-step in a dramatic process of metamorphosis as it transforms into unusual organic lifeforms. A pair of rollerskates gradually becomes a network of fungus-like membranes, or an ordinary handbag grows an unnerving coat of sharp spikes. From her artist statement:

Engaging with abstract and familiar motifs, I juxtapose sculptures to create a sense of dialogue or play between them. I approach my work in series and components, ultimately building an ongoing inventory of personal experience and observation.

I compile these in various arrangements to create communities that interact and form new relationships – much like the small seemingly insignificant moments in our everyday lives that come together to create unexpected outcomes. These manifest as miniature theatres – one act plays, where shifts of scale and perception occur. Despite the absence of the human form there is an implied presence, where the viewer can project themselves into another world.

Young’s work is currently on view for two more days at Forum Gallery in New York, so don’t miss it. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx David!)

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You Know That Place. Paper. 30 x 40 x 4 in.

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If I Had Learned Earlier. Paper. 22 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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In Close Range. Paper. 24 x 35 x 2.5 in.

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It Came With Me Everywhere. Paper. 19 x 38 x 4 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Paper hair curler, coils. 21 x 32 x 2 in.

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It’s Worth it This Time. Detail.

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I Was Thinking of Something Else. Paper lawn chair, leaves. 17 x 24 x 3 in.

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New Delicate Cut Paper Flowers by Maude White

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Paper-cutting artist Maude White (previously) continues to astound us with her painstaking illustrations cut from single sheets of paper. Limited to only negative and positive space, she explores poetic compositions of line and shape as she renders each piece with a knife. White is currently working on a series of blooms as part of an upcoming exhibition at Buffalo Arts Studio, and if you want to learn a bit more about her process she recently did an interview over on Block Club.

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Cecilia Levy Produces Eggshell-Thin Cups and Saucers Out of Spiderman Comics and Century-Old Books

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Swedish artist Cecilia Levy creates cups, saucers, bowls, plates and saucers out of paper, turning delicate 2D materials into layered 3D sculptures. Although she often uses books from the beginning of the last century, her choices are not narrow as she has also utilized Spiderman comics for an entire series.

To create each work, she takes apart the books, magazines, and comics, tearing the pages and pasting small pieces of them back together. Levy explains her works are, “eggshell thin, yet remarkably steady. The story lives on, but in a different shape.”

Cecilia Levy’s background is in graphic design and bookbinding, but began to experiment with dissecting books to produce different shapes in 2009. Since 2013 Levy has worked full time as a paper artist, exhibiting her work in both Sweden and abroad.

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Elaborate New Laser-Cut Paper Windows by Eric Standley Borrow Patterns from Art History and Architecture

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Ithica. Cut paper, 20″ x 26″, 2015.

In an exquisite nexus of mathematics, art history, and technology, artist Eric Standley (previously) creates densely stacked layers of laser-cut paper to form sculptures reminiscent of Islamic architecture or Gothic rose windows. If you’ve followed the artist’s work here on Colossal it’s clear his understanding of geometry, shape and color as it applies to paper structures has expanded greatly over the last few years as his artworks grow increasingly intricate and detailed. The pieces have also grown in scale and depth with his latest pieces standing over two feet tall.

Standley currently has work on view at CODA Paper Art 2015 and at MOCA through August 16th, 2015. He also has numerous pieces currently available through Marta Hewett Gallery.

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Ithica. Detail.

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Agawam. Cut paper, 20″ x 26″, 2015.

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Agawam, detail.

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Agawam, detail.

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Either/Or Circle 9.5.1. Cut paper. 20″ x 20″. 2015.

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Either/Or Circle 9.5.1. Detail.

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Either/Or Tetragon 7.2.3. Cut paper, watercolor, 8″ x 10″, 2015.

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Bird Portraits Painted On Secondhand Books Featuring Their Native Brazilian Habitats Carved from the Pages

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Guy Laramée‘s (previously) new series Onde Elles Moran (Where They Live) captures the mystique of the native birds of the Brazilian region Serra do Corvo Branco (Range of the White Raven) through both portrait and carved landscape. The series contains nine sculptures sourced from secondhand bookstores within the country—tomes of the Classicos Jackson which is a series of literature classics published in the ‘50s in Brazil. The rich linen covers inspired the palettes of many of the portraits, the original colors working their way into Laramée’s artistic remodeling.

Although Laramée had originally planned to photograph the vast canyons of the region during his 4-month visit, the diversity, songs, and liveliness of the native birds kept persuading him to eclipse the beautiful scenes with their portraits. The series is dedicated to these birds and their habitat, each book containing a portrait of one on the cover against a faded background and an environmental carving into the pages of the book on the opposite side. The size ratio of the bird to corresponding landscape highlights the creatures’ importance, acknowledging their role as the true owners and rulers of the region.

“Being in the company of these lively beings were one thing, painting them was another story,” explained Laramée while discussing his process. “They became like ghosts on a theater backdrop, posing in front of wallpaper, looking at a vanishing scenery.”

Laramée hopes that this series exudes the stark differences between Man and bird, recognizing that we do not live within the same world. Man’s world has been transformed into an object from which we now feel alienated he explains—we live within our heads and books, not the canyons or earth. “Maybe where they live is where we should live,” says Laramée. “In the solitude of virgin landscapes, we might rediscover our intimate relationships to the world.”

Laramée is represented by JHB Gallery in New York City.

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Wet Fold Origami Technique Gives Wavy Personality to Paper Animals by Artist Hoang Tien Quyet

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Often one associates origami with sharp and precise folds, miniature works that have a crisp perfection. Origami artist Hoang Tien Quyet shies away from this rigidity, instead folding his small objects with a technique called “wet-folding,” which allows curves to be created instead of the typical straight lines. With this technique Vietnam-based Quyet creates posed animals bounding with personality, their heads tilted and wings ready for flight.

The technique of wet folding was created by the late origami master Akira Yoshizawa, and involves dampening the paper so it easily accepts folds. Wet-folding gives the paper works a more realistic appearance, adds a rounded quality to the origami, and allows it to appear malleable even though the pieces dry into hardened forms. Wet-folding also involves using a thicker paper, as traditional origami paper would easily tear if wet.

Quyet is co-author of two books, “50 hours Origami +” and “VOG2 – origami.vn,” both published by Passion Origami. Quyet’s skill and has lead to him being invited to several international origami conventions, including Germany, France, Italy, and Japan. You can see more images of Quyet’s animals on his Flickr. (via My Modern Met)

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PaperBridge: A Load-Bearing Arch of Paper Sheets Spans an English Creek

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all photos by Steve Messam courtesy the artist

While it’s certainly not the longest, this weight-bearing structure is definitely one of the more interesting bridges we’ve come across. Unveiled earlier this month, PaperBridge is the latest site-specific installation by environmental artist Steve Messam. It was constructed using 22,000 sheets of bright, red paper. And despite weighing in at over 4.2 tons, the free-standing structure doesn’t have a single screw, bolt or swab of glue holding it together.

On an aesthetic level, PaperBridge acts as focal point that creates a stark contrast between the bridge and the lush landscape. But on a conceptual level, Messam explains the key relationship between the bridge and its surroundings:

Paper is a simple material made from wood pulp and water. The intensity of colour used in the bridge contrasts with the verdant landscape making a bold statement of form and design. Alongside this the materials used have a resonance with the natural environment and the construction of the bridge also reflects local architectural forms, specifically pack horse bridges found throughout the area. All of the paper used in PaperBridge will be recovered and returned to the Burneside Mill for recycling into new paper once the project ends. This transparent cycle is part of the overall environmental narrative of the piece.

PaperBridge was part of the ‘Lakes Ignite’ project. It was located in the Grisedale Valley, near Patterdale and the public was invited to walk across it before it gets taken down today. (via Designboom and The Kid Should See This)

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