Tag Archives: paper

Geometric Currency Sculptures Folded by Kristi Malakoff

I’m really enjoying these folded and pasted currency sculptures by Canadian visual artist Kristi Malakoff (previously). Each polyhedra is folded, cut and pasted together from several bills, blending the textures and colors from multiple worldwide currencies. (via my modern met)

Update: These particular pieces were designed by Tom Hull, Meenakshi Mukerji, Heinz Strobl, and Makoto Yamaguchi.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Geological Street Art Seen on the Streets of L.A.

For the past few months Paige Smith of A Common Name has been installing colorful geodes within the gaps of crumbling buildings and other public infrastructure on the streets of L.A. Each piece is site-specific and made from carefully cut and painted paper. I think it would be pretty awesome to stumble onto one of these in the wild without knowing anything about it. You can see a full gallery of all the sedentary formations as well as a map of their locations over at A Common Name, and hey folks, don’t steal the geodes. (via present and correct)

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Cut Paper Illustrations by Bovey Lee

Artist Bovey Lee hand cuts wonderfully detailed illustrations into Chinese rice paper creating nearly weightless artworks that seem to buzz with fantastical narratives. Born in Hong Kong, Lee now lives and works in Pittsburgh and you can see much more of her work here. Incredible work. (via everyday frustone)

Time-lapse Portraits Layered and Cut to Reveal the Passage of Time

For over a year I’ve been stalking the website of book and paper artist Ryuta Iida hoping to share new work with you and today I finally have something to show for it. As part of an ongoing collaboration with artist Yoshihisa Tanaka called Nerhol the duo are showing 27 new works at limArt this month including these astounding new portraits that are part of a series called Misunderstanding Focus. At first glance it looks as though a photograph has been printed numerous times, layered and cut into a sort of sculptural topography, which would indeed be amazing enough, but Nerhol took things a bit further. The numerous portraits are actually different, photographed over a period of three minutes as the subject tried to sit motionless, the idea being that it’s impossible to ever truly be still as our center of gravity shifts and our muscles are tense. The portraits are actually a layered lime-lapse representing several minutes in the subjects life and then cut like an onion to show slices of time, similar to the trunk of a tree. What a brilliant idea. If you’ve never seen Iida’s cut paper books, definitely head over to Nerhol to see them up close. A huge thanks to my friend Johnny at Spoon & Tamago for helping me translate some of this! (via upon a fold)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Origami Stop Motion Videos by Sipho Mabona

I’m really enjoying this pair of perfectly executed stop motion videos shot by animation studio stoptrick featuring the origami work of Sipho Mabona. Mabona also just completed a fun origami installation for the Japanese American National Museum in L.A. featuring a swarm of locusts folded from uncut sheets of U.S. currency. (via laughing squid)

Clouds, Smoke and Portals Torn into Photographs

Raleigh-based artist and landscape architect Scott Hazard uses carefully layered photographs to create delicately torn concentric shapes symbolizing plumes of smoke, clouds, and mysterious portals in walls. Hazard has also used adaptations of the same technique to create a number of fantastic typographic works he calls Text Constructs.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Love Is Making Its Way Back Home: A Stop Motion Animation Using 12,000 Sheets of Construction Paper

This great new video for Josh Ritter’s Love Is Making Its Way Back Home was directed by Erez Horovitz and involves the meticulous animation of over 12,000 laser-cut pieces of construction paper. Via Etsy:

A team of nearly twenty artists, editors, directors and product assistants ushered the video into being. The group started with storyboarding and computer animation before converting the digital graphics to paper cutouts (frame by frame), photographing those 12,000 cutouts and then stitching them together into four minutes of paper animation.

You can learn more about how it was done and see some great behind the scenes shots on Josh Ritter’s blog. (via etsy)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 20 of 37«...19202122...»