Tag Archives: paper

Tessellating Patterns Formed From Intricately Folded Paper by Polly Verity 


Sculptor Polly Verity interlocks domes, orbs, and other curved structures by strategically folding large sheets of paper. The result of these intricate manipulations is landscapes of patterns that seem to rise effortlessly from their 2D material. Her works tesselate from one shape to the other, repeating both hard-edged and curved shapes throughout the folded sculptures. You can see more of these dexterous forms on her Flickr and Instagram.










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The Lunar Cycle Displayed Through 15,000 Colorful Origami Birds 



All images via Mathgoth Gallerie

Mademoiselle Maurice (previously here and here) recently produced the mural “The Lunar Cycle” in collaboration with the French Mathgoth Gallerie, a temporary piece that pays tribute to the hundreds of residents who were temporarily uprooted due to the upcoming demolition of the building. Composed of 15,000 colorful origami birds, the piece forms the cycles of the moon against the dark background of the wall and covers over 21,000 square feet of space—making it the largest urban mural ever created in Paris. Each origami is painted after folding using a solution deemed “Maurigami” by Mademoiselle Maurice, making the pieces nearly indestructible. You can see more of her original origami-based murals on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)








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Hand-Cut Mandalas and Other Intricate Paper Works by Mr. Riu 


All images via @mr_riu

Japanese artist Mr. Riu takes paper cutting to an intricate extreme, crafting mandalas and elaborate figures with a precision work tool called the swivel knife. This tool allows him to cut curves more fluidly, as the head of the knife can turn 360 degrees. With this movement, Riu produces asymmetrical imagery that is often filled with hidden details—winged horses that sprout from points in a star and snakes that wrap themselves around the eyes of his figural works.

Riu’s captions for his Instagram images are often inspirational and speak to the dedication and patience he has developed during his paper cutting practice. “It’s not that I can do it because I originally have a great patience,” says Riu in one of his captions, “I think that my patience grows stronger gradually because I want to do it.”

You can see more of Mr. Riu’s work on his Instagram and blog.






Mr.Riu_06 Mr.Riu_01

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New Giant Paper Flower Sculptures by Tiffanie Turner 


All images provided by Tiffanie Turner

Tiffanie Turner (previously) individually cuts thousands of segments of paper to piece together her often 5-foot-wide flower compositions, works that can take up to 400 hours to complete by hand. Turner’s artwork aims to explore nature’s bloom and decay, and during a recent residency at the de Young Museum in San Francisco she enlisted over 4,000 visitors to collectively compose and then destroy a Ranunculus sculpture while stationed at the museum during the month of May.

Many of the works she created while in residence will head to the Tower Hill Botanic Garden in Boylston, Massachusetts for an exhibition opening August 9th and running through September 18th, 2016. You can see more of Turner’s work on her blog and Instagram.










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Spiraling Rainbow Vortexes Created From Layered Paper by Jen Stark 


Full Circle (detail), 2014, latex spray paint on PVC, monofilament, 36 x 36 x 76 in., all images via Jen Stark

Jen Stark's work appears like psychedelic wormholes, pulsating and multi-colored portals that might throw you into another dimension entirely. Working outward from an equally prismatic core, the pieces radiate entire spectrums of color from layered paper, PVC, or foam board. These contrasting colors and repetition give the works a feeling of movement and cyclical regeneration and feel almost as if one is staring into a deep and hypnotizing cavern.

Stark’s work concentrates on this hypnotic feel, both in its aesthetic and time-intensive process of layering hundreds of material components. Once composed, the works give the illusion of the infinite, as if their colors never truly end. “The idea of infinity is so hard to grasp, and I love this challenge,” Stark told Colossal. “I think small bits of infinity are the building blocks of nature, like in the never ending patterns of fractals and particles… I think geometry, nature, and mathematics have everything in common!”

We most recently encountered Stark’s work last month during our weekend at FORM Arcosanti with WeTransfer where she was taking a short hiatus from layered paper works to produce customized face paintings in her same colorful style. You can see more of her works and travels on her Instagram, and make sure to look out for an upcoming solo exhibition with Eric Firestone Gallery later this year.


Vortextural, 2013, installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue, 42 x 35 x 30 in.


Box 1, 2014, acid-free paper, foamboard, glue, MDF, paint, 10 x 10 x 10.25 in.


Cosmic Shift, 2015, hand-cut acid-free colored paper, foam board, glue, acrylic paint, wood, varnish, 37 x 24 x 25 in.


Cosmic Shift (detail), 2015, hand-cut acid-free colored paper, foam board, glue, acrylic paint, wood, varnish, 37 x 24 x 25 in.


Pedestal (detail), 2013, acid-free paper, foam core, MDF, paint, glue, 22 x 22 x 36 in


Vortex (detail), 2014, acid-free colored paper, glue, wood, paint, 32 x 34 x 4 in.


The Whole (detail), 2012, installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue, drywall, 3 x 3 x 3.5 ft

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Tiny Paper Flowers Inspired by Pencil Shavings by Haruka Misawa 


All images via Haruka Misawa

Attracted to the shape of the shavings that were formed while sharpening her pencil, designer Haruka Misawa decided to explore how they could be formed into realistic flowers. Printing paper with a color gradation, she tightly wraps it in a pencil-like shape so the flowers blossom outward when scraped against the shaver. Each flower created in this method is completely unique, Misawa’s technique making it impossible to replicate the same design of each of her 15-40 mm flowers twice.

You can see more of Misawa’s designs on her Instagram. (via Faith is Torment and This Isn’t Happiness)





HarukaMisawa_06  HarukaMisawa_03  HarukaMisawa_01

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