Tag Archives: paper

Sweeping Lace Patterns Cut into Dense Collages of Newspaper Covers by Myriam Dion

Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

Starting with daily covers of the Financial Times, the Gazette, or the New York Times, Montreal-based paper artist Myriam Dion (previously) cuts sweeping lace-like patterns into collages of newsprint. In earlier artworks Dion left newspaper covers intact while delicately cutting her patterns with an X-ACTO knife, but in recent pieces she’s also incorporated collage. Sometimes multiple covers are cut to create repeating patterns or text is overlaid with photographs. The fragile collages are usually titled after each individual newspaper’s date and primary subject, a strange juxtaposition given the beauty conveyed in her patterns can be at odds with the content: “Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster“. Via Division Gallery:

At a period in history where printed news faces extinction, Myriam Dion’s intricate newspaper cut-outs explore the intersection between folk traditions and popular culture. Crafting thoughtful mosaics out of world events, she questions our appetite for sound-bite news and sensational art, showing us the quiet power of a patient hand and an inquisitive eye.

Dion had her first solo exhibition at Division Gallery earlier this year which also represented the final project of her master’s degree from the Université du Québec à Montréal. You can see more in her portfolio and at Division Gallery.


Monday October 20, Blessed Pope, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 19 5/8 x 11 3/8 in. (50 x 29 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 36 1/4 x 22 7/8 in. (92 x 58 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.



Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.



Saturday, May 31st, Slow Down, 2014, 31″ × 31″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

dion-11Le Parisien, 1945 / Le Devoir, 100 ans après, 2014, 26″ × 24″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Handmade Kraft Paper Animations by Nancy Liang


From time to time we love to stop and marvel at the mathematical wizardry of artists and designers who make GIFs with code, but Sydney-based illustrator Nancy Liang takes an old-school approach with her imaginative scenes made almost entirely by hand. There isn’t a single element in her animations that doesn’t begin as a physical drawing or object. Liang works mostly with kraft paper cutouts and pencil drawings, all of which is carefully planned in copious sketches before each element is scanned and animated in Photoshop. Seen here are a few of her most recent pieces, you can see more on her Tumblr: Over the Moon.





New Urban Geodes on the Streets of L.A. by Paige Smith


Surrounding an exhibition at Maker City LA, artist Paige Smith A.K.A. a common name (previously), began to install new crystalized rock formations around the streets of LA. The geodesic rock formations which she refers to as urban geodes are created mostly with paper and spray paint or cast resin in random cracks and crevices around the city. She’s also installed geodes in Spain, Istanbul, Jordan, South Korea, and elsewhere around the world over the last few years. For the most up-to-date news on her geological street art you can follow smith on Instagram.









See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Meticulously Handcrafted Paper Objects by Zim & Zou


Master paper crafting duo Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann of Zim & Zou (previously) continue to create some of the most eye-catching paper illustrations around. The two French designers focus mostly on handcrafted objects made from materials like paper, thread, wood, and leather for one-of-a-kind window displays, editorial illustrations, and posters. Some of their most recent projects include a lovely poster commissioned by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to encourage childhood vaccinations as well as work for the SXSW Film Festival and Hermès Maison Shanghai. See more on Behance.










See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Hole Punch Flipbooks by Scott Blake



Artist Scott Blake, known widely for his barcode art, recently began experimenting with the humble hole puncher. By punching different patterns that shift from page to page, he creates short animations that twist and rotate as you flip. He currently has four different versions available through his site. (via Junk Culture, Visual News, Boing Boing)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

A Sprawling New Cut Paper Bacterium by Rogan Brown

Detail 5

Cut Microbe (2015 handcut paper)

Detail 1

Detail 3

Process 2

Artist Rogan Brown (previously) recently completed work on this new cut paper sculpture titled Cut Microbe. Four months in the making, the piece is a continuation of Brown’s exploration of the human biome and was inspired by the form of salmonella and ecoli bacteria (this 44″ sculpture is about half a million times bigger than the real thing). The sculpture will be on view this May as part of a commission by the Eden Project in the UK. You can see more of Rogan’s work on his website.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Old Books Transformed into Imaginative 3D Illustrations of Fairy Tale Scenes








Seattle-based artist Isobelle Ouzman creates 3D illustrations from discarded books found in dumpsters, recycling bins, and local thrift stores. She adopts these forgotten books as a way to give them a second life, cutting and pasting the books into layered fairy tale scenes instead of letting the novels collect dust or fall prey to the elements.

Ouzman creates her whimsical and monochromatic environments with an X-Acto knife, glue, watercolors and Micron pens. Each work focuses on plants and animals, several layers of winding forestry surrounding her central characters.

Each book can take between two and three months to complete, which is why Ouzman is currently on hold with commissions until October. To submit a commission for her found book illustrations contact her here, or browse the books on her Etsy site. (via Lustik)

Page 3 of 38«...2345...»