Tag Archives: paper

Transfixing 3D Paper Patterns by Maud Vantours

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Paris-based designer and artist Maud Vantours uses layer upon layer of cut paper to create hypnotizing patterns and textures that translate into set designs, fashion accessories, and editorial treatments. Vantors has explored a number of 3D paper treatments including floral patterns, spirals, and gemotric designs. You can see more of her work at Figure and over on Behance. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

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Sculptures Made from Cut and Curled Paper by Gunjan Aylawadi

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From the series “Lost & Found”

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From the series “Lost & Found” | detail

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“Against the Wind”

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“Against the Wind” | detail

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“Derweze”

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“Derweze” | detail

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“Derweze” | detail

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“Rabie” | Spring, breeze in Arabic

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“Rabie” | detail

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“Rabie” | detail

The Sydney, Australia-based artist Gunjan Aylawadi creates intricate, colorful sculptures that appear to resemble woven textiles. However, upon closer observation, her work—inspired by patterns and motifs in Islamic art—are made entirely from curled paper. The process, long and intricate, can cost the artist months on a single artwork. And not just any old paper will do. For example, “Against the Wind” is made from hand-cut strips of paper from old music books, which are then individually hand rolled and assembled. Although complicated, Aylawadi’s reasons for making art are simple: “What I enjoy most about making my work is the experience people have when they look at it,” she says. “They stop for a moment to have a closer look and the moment turns into long minutes of being fascinated by the beauty a simple medium like paper can add to the work infront of their eyes.” (via Lustik)

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Illuminated Cut Paper Light Boxes by Hari & Deepti

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Deepti Nair and Harikrishnan Panicker (known collectively as Hari & Deepti) are an artist couple who create paper cut light boxes. Each diorama is made from layers of cut watercolor paper placed inside a shadow box and is lit from behind with flexible LED light strips. The small visual narratives depicted in each work often play off aspects of light including stars, flames, fireflies, and planets. The couple shares about their work:

Paper is brutal in its simplicity as a medium. It demands the attention of the artist while it provides the softness they need to mold it in to something beautiful. It is playful, light, colorless and colorful. It is minimal and intricate. It reflects light, creates depth and illusions in a way that it takes the artist through a journey with limitless possibilities.

What amazes us about the paper cut light boxes is the dichotomy of the piece in its lit and unlit state, the contrast is so stark that it has this mystical effect on the viewers.

Hari & Deepti are originally from India but now live and work in Denver. Their work most recently appeared at SCOPE New York through Black Book Gallery. (via Hi-Fructose, My Modern Met)

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Flora and Fauna Escape the Confines of Over 1,000 Repurposed Books

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Assembled from hundreds of cutout plants and animals from repurposed textbooks, artist Andrea Mastrovito created a striking installation where a colony of bats clings to the ceiling, a flight butterflies swarm the gallery walls, and all matter of insects, mamammals and plants intermingle across the floor. The sprawling artwork spans the realms of collage, diorama and trompe-l’œil and was inspired in part by H. G. Wells’ science fiction novel The Island of Doctor Moreau. Titled The Island of Dr. Mastrovito and The Island of Dr. Mastrovito II the piece was first installed at Governors Island in New York back in 2010 and again last year in a different configuration at Mudac in Lausanne, Switzerland. Via the artist:

His starting points for this site-specific work are the two most common forms of home recreation—books and television. The title of his installation refers to H. G. Wells’ famous novel The Island of Doctor Moreau, in which the archetypal “mad” scientist experiments upon animals in order to give them human traits. In this “Island,” the artist substitutes himself for the doctor, trying to instill a new life into that which was once alive in a different way (books from paper, paper from wood, and wood from trees). Mastrovito imagines that the outside fauna take control of the abandoned house and become its proper inhabitants. Approximately 700 books were brought under the artist’s knife to cut out real-size images of animals. This trompe-l’oeil, or paper diorama, also suggests the strength of images, the infinite possibilities that knowledge—through books—can give us in order to create and re-create the world that we can only imagine.

You can see much more of Mastrovito’s work over on his website.

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New Cut Paper Illustrations from Zim & Zou

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It’s been over two years since we last featured the work of French duo Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann of Zim&Zou (previously here and here). The pair of graphic designers create paper sculpture, installations, and illustrations for leading luxury brands, books, magazines as well as their own edification. Collected here are a number of works from the last few years and you can explore much more over on their website and on Behance.

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Artist Sipho Mabona Successfully Folds Life-sized Origami Elephant from Single Sheet of Paper

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Photo by Philipp Schmidli

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Photo by Philipp Schmidli

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Following a successful campaign on Indiegogo which raised nearly $26,000, artist Sipho Mabona followed through on his promise to fold a life-sized elephant from a single giant sheet of paper. The piece stands over 10 feet tall (3 meters) and took a team of nearly a dozen people over four weeks to fold. The final sculpture is on view at KKLB in Beromünster, Switzerland. Photos by Philipp Schmidli. (via My Modern Met)

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Li Hongbo: Statues in Motion

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There’s been a tremendous amount of coverage online and off about artist Li Hongbo’s astounding paper sculptures constructed from stacks of layered paper that can flex and contort into eye-popping shapes. You can read previous posts here on Colossal for more detail about his work, but if you just can’t get enough, you’re in luck. Kid Guy Collective in collaboration with Eli Klein from Klein Sun Gallery, have finally documented the artist’s sculptures in a truly artful way. Shot at 240 frames per second, the video finally captures the fine details of Hongbo’s work for those of us unable to see them up close. Want even more? Here’s an extended cut.

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