patterns

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with patterns



Art

Swaths of Old-Fashioned Fabric Obscure Faces and Bodies in Unsettling Portraits by Markus Åkesson

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Now You See Me” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

In his paintings, Swedish artist Markus Åkesson depicts ornately patterned fabrics like toile, chintz, and silks wrapped around female subjects. Instead of using the old-fashioned textiles simply as signifiers of wealth and tradition, he uses the materials to take on a more sinister tone. In some of the paintings you can see expressions of sadness in the subject’s faces, while in others, the textiles completely overtake the figures beneath, obscuring their identity and emotions.

“As a child, I often sat and looked at the different patterns in textiles and tapestries,” Åkesson shares with Colossal. “I would find my own images in them, my own world, and I would dream away. For me, the pattern as a concept has a built in feeling of safety and stability, because it repeats itself over and over again. I think the use of patterns in images that depicts more melancholic or even disturbing scenes makes a interesting feeling of duality.”

The artist is represented by Galerie Da-End in Paris and VIDA Museum in Öland, Sweden, where he recently had a solo show. You can see more of Åkesson’s work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

“Now You See Me (Opium)” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia II)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“Palmistry” (2016), oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm

“I Never Wanted You To Leave” (2016), oil on canvas, 210 x 180cm

“The Unicorn Hunt ll” (2017), oil on canvas, 200 x 170cm

 

 



Art

Painted Street Carpets Connect Modern Cities to Ancient Ornamentation by Arthur-Louis Ignoré

June 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Arthur-Louis Ignoré, also known as Ali, paints white patterned carpets on public sidewalks and passageways in cities across the world, including recent installations throughout France and Finland. The works are inspired by both geometric and botanical patterns found in ancient ornamentation from a wide range of cultural contexts. By combining the patterns into public works, he showcases the diversity found in our modern cities while providing a domestic aesthetic that contrasts the often brutalist feel of urban environments.

Currently the artist lives in Rennes, France, where a few years ago he painted his largest installation to date. The 10,000-square-foot mandala was painted on the roof of the Social Welfare Family Allowance building, and visually created links between works Ali produced in both Montreal and New York City. You can see more of his painted carpet installations on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art Photography

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

December 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Craft Design Food

Colorful Paper Foods and Patterns by Maud Vantours

November 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Paper artist Maud Vantours brings paper to life through a wide variety of commercial and self-initiated projects that span 3D paper sculpture displays for top brands to editorial work for magazines and ad agencies. The French designer has also explored a more artistic realm with her organic Oscillations series. Vantours shares some of her most recent work on Instagram.

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

 

 



Animation Art

An Architectural Study of a Norwegian Cathedral Facade Animated From a Single Photo

November 3, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Animator Ismael Sanz-Pena has brought the sculptural facade of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim, Norway to life through a unique continuous motion animation that uses just one photograph. Sanz-Pena’s pairing of the video with a lively, fast-paced Liberian field recording of chants, cheers, and drumming adds an extra element of vitality. The artist described his process to Colossal:

The idea behind the film was to find the innate movement inherit in still forms. Every sculpture has movement in it, and it is the task of the animator to discover it. It was through the process of editing my imagery that I discovered that a single image would suffice to create the animation. The film was made by zooming into the image and panning row by row while making sure that different architectural motives aligned in every increment. This also gave a structure to the film.

Originally hailing from Spain, Sanz-Pena has studied and worked in the field of animation around the world and is currently an assistant professor of animation at the Kansas City Art Institute.

 

 



Art

Accumulation: A Dramatic Concentric Tunnel of Light Patterns by Yang Minha

September 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New media artist Yang Minha recently completed work on this dizzying light tunnel installed outside the main gate of Le Méridien Seoul in South Korea. Titled Accumulation, the piece is comprised of rotating square panels that display an ongoing sequence of 6 geometric patterns based on six concepts: rise, flow, accumulation, dimension, light, and overlap. You can see more of Minha’s digital work on his website. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Art

Densely Textured Murals Reminiscent of Topographical Maps by ‘Klone’

August 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing body of work titled Personal Topography, artist Klone has painted murals around the world in this distinct, striped style. The paintings of creatures and people are meant as a visual metaphor for the ways in which personalities and inner identities differ. “The series explores both the way each [person] and other creatures have their own topography, represented by the topographical lines,” Klone shares with Colossal. “The simplicity of colour limitations provides the idea in a direct approach and there is a constant attempt to work with the surface and not necessarily make it disappear, so the wall stays a wall and a building is still the building.”

The works seen here went up in Canada, the United States, Poland, Norway, Ukraine and Israel over the last year. Klone was born in Ukraine and now lives and works in Tel Aviv. You can see more of his work on his website and on Instagram.