Tag Archives: performance art

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days performance art installation humor architecture
Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

Two Artists Live and Work on a Giant Rotating Hamster Wheel for 10 Days performance art installation humor architecture
Photo by Scott Lynch courtesy Gothamist

Artists Alex Schweder and Ward Shelley have constructed a giant wood hamster wheel with a 25-foot-diameter where the duo are currently living and working for 10 days until March 9 at the Boiler in Williamsburg, Brookyln. Why? Because …art! Titled In Orbit, the piece is a continuation of numerous installations where the artists live together in public spaces including Counterweight Roommmate and Stability which they refer to as “architectural performance pieces.”

For In Orbit, the rotating house is designed so that Shelley can live on the exterior of the wheel nearly 30 ft. off the floor, while Schweder lives on the inside due to a fear of heights. Through coordinated movements the pair can rotate the wheel to access beds, desks, chairs and even a kitchen-bathroom combo. You can learn more over at Gothamist and Peirogi Gallery. Photos and video by Scott Lynch. (via Laughing Squid)

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Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

Just the Two of Us: Portraits of Cosplay Enthusiasts in their Homes by Klaus Pichler portraits performance art cosplay Austria

We’re less than a day past October 31st and it would be reasonable to assume the people depicted in these portraits are wearing Halloween costumes, but they’re not. In his ongoing series of portraits titled Just the Two of Us, photographer Klaus Pitchler gained access to the homes of Austrian costume play (cosplay) enthusiasts where he photographed the elaborately costumed individuals against the backdrops of their everyday life. Via his artist statement:

Who hasn’t had the desire just to be someone else for awhile? Dressing up is a way of creating an alter ego and a second skin which one’s behaviour can be adjusted to. Regardless of the motivating factors which cause somebody to acquire a costume, the main principle remains the same: the civilian steps behind the mask and turns into somebody else. ’Just the Two of Us’ deals with both: the costumes and the people behind them.

While the costumes are incredible, terrifying, and laughable, it’s the strange juxtaposition of ordinary home life and the unknown identities of each individual that create such great images. See much more here. All images courtesy Klaus Pichler. (via Beautiful/Decay)

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Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind

Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind water sound performance art interactive emotions device

Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind water sound performance art interactive emotions device

Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind water sound performance art interactive emotions device

Beautiful Thoughts: Artist Lisa Park Manipulates Water with Her Mind water sound performance art interactive emotions device

Conceptual artist Lisa Park has been experimenting with a specialized device called a NeuroSky EEG headset that helps transform brain activity into streams of data that can be manipulated for the purposes of research, or in this case, a Fluxus-inspired performance art piece titled Euonia (Greek for “beautiful thought”). Park used the EEG headset to monitor the delta, theta, alpha, and beta waves of her brain as well as eye movements and transformed the resulting data with specialized software into sound waves. Five speakers are placed under shallow dishes of water which then vibrate in various patterns in accordance with her brain activity.

While the system is not an exact science, Park rehearsed for nearly a month by thinking about specific people whom she had strong emotional reactions to. The artist then correlated each of the five speakers with certain emotions: sadness, anger, hatred, desire, and happiness. According to the Creator’s Project her hope had been to achieve a sort of zen-like state resulting in complete silence, however it proved to be ultimately unattainable, a result that is actually somewhat poetic.

It’s important to note that artists have long been using EEG devices to create “music with the mind”. Composer and experimental musician Alvin Lucier had a somewhat similar performance called Music for Solo Performer back in 1965. Read more about Euonia over on the Creator’s Project. (via booooooom)

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Mädir Eugster Perfectly Balances a Feather Atop 14 Giant Branches

Mädir Eugster Perfectly Balances a Feather Atop 14 Giant Branches performance art performance balance

Mädir Eugster Perfectly Balances a Feather Atop 14 Giant Branches performance art performance balance

Mädir Eugster Perfectly Balances a Feather Atop 14 Giant Branches performance art performance balance

When you first begin watching this clip from Japan’s Kamiwaza 2013 talent show, you’ll notice a fair amount of dramatic lighting, deep breathing, and plenty of showmanship from Swiss performer Mädir Eugster of the Rigolo Swiss Nouveau Cirque. He carefully rests the feather on a small tree branch and then grabs another slightly larger stick and another and another. Fast forward ten minutes and the act miraculously continues, sweat pouring from the top of Eugster’s head down his bare back until a series of 14 enormous sticks zig zags from the performer’s lifted arm like a massive wooden Calder mobile. If you have any doubt of how precarious this might be, wait until the very end when he removes the feather. I’ve also included another video above of Lara Jacobs (Eugster’s daughter!) of Cirque Du Soleil’s Amaluna performing the same act. Pretty amazing.

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Firewall: An Interactive Fabric Surface by Aaron Sherwood

Firewall: An Interactive Fabric Surface by Aaron Sherwood performance art light interactive digital

Firewall is a new interactive artwork by New York media artist Aaron Sherwood created in collaboration with Michael Allison. The presentation is relatively straightforward but still visually stunning: different ‘modes’ of light are projected onto a taut membrane of spandex which then reacts kinetically in response to touch. Firewall was made using Processing, Max/MSP, Arduino and a Kinect that work in tandem to create the experience and will be used in an upcoming performance art piece involving dancer Kiori Kawai who will interact with the piece on stage. Learn more over on Sherwood’s blog. (via designboom)

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Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Rino Pizzi

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Blue

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Rino Pizzi

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Christy Cochran

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Art Night Austin

Artist Beili Liu Embroiders Underneath Hundreds of Suspended Scissors textiles scissors performance art embroidery
Photo by Art Night Austin

The Mending Project was a 2011 installation and performance art piece by Austin-based artist Beili Liu. The work involved an ongoing process wherein visitors were invited to cut pieces of fabric from a giant cloth upon entering the space, the fragments of which Liu then stitched back together creating a giant patchwork that gradually encircled the artist. The concept seems harmless enough if it weren’t for the ominous array of downward-facing scissors suspended above her workspace.

The installation consists of hundreds of Chinese scissors suspended from the ceiling, pointing downwards. The hovering, massive cloud of scissors alludes to distant fear, looming violence and worrisome uncertainty. The performer sits beneath the countless sharp blades of the scissors, and performs an on-going simple task of mending. [...] As each visitor enters the space, one is asked to cut off a piece of the white cloth hung near the entrance, and offer the cut section to the performer. She then continuously sews the cut pieces onto the previous ones. The mended fabric grows in size throughout the duration of the performance, and takes over the vast area of the floor beneath the scissors.

The Mending Project was part of Art Night Austin 2011 and was on display at Women & Their Work Gallery (via job’s wife)

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Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists

Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists street art performance art animals

Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists street art performance art animals

Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists street art performance art animals

Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists street art performance art animals

Animae Dementia: Mystical Paper Beasts Devour Unsuspecting Street Artists street art performance art animals

I’m loving this ongoing paste-up series by street artists Ro and l’Homme Pendu. Entitled Animae Dementia (roughly “soul madness” or “animal madness”) the project features the duo installing these giant paste-ups of crazy mythical beings who seem to turn on their unwitting creators. So far works have appeared in Berlin and near Notre Dame in Paris. I can’t wait to see what happens next.

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