Tag Archives: photo realism

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism surreal photo realism illustration digital 3d

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism surreal photo realism illustration digital 3d

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism surreal photo realism illustration digital 3d

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism surreal photo realism illustration digital 3d

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism surreal photo realism illustration digital 3d

Digital artist Adam Martinakis (previously) was born Poland in 1972 and currently lives and works in in Cannock, UK. His computer-generated artworks employ aspects of photorealism and surrealism to explore the human condition which he says results in a “mixture of post-fantasy futurism and abstract symbolism”. Above are a handful of works from the last year or so, several of which were on view at The Lloyd Gill Gallery through last week as part of a group show titled Metaphysical Objectivity in Comparison to Realism. You can see much more here.

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh photo realism painting New York landscapes Chicago architecture

Many painters working from photographic source material employ a wide variety of techniques to arrive at a final image. This will involve anything from loose sketching beforehand to complex grids, where a photograph is translated into paint box by box. Such is not the case with British painter Nathan Walsh who instead relies on elaborate drawings reminiscent of architectural blueprints before every committing paint to canvas. This deep reverence for the underpinning geometry and perspective gives each work a sense of life that might otherwise not be present in something created with the mechanical aid of a camera or software.

Walsh tells me his primary source materials are not photographs but pencil sketches drawn on-site, for example the Chicago pieces above began from over 100 drawings he then references in his studio. In this way he can easily alter the position and size of any particular element, a process he likens to “building a world from scratch”. Personally I think the process is more akin to building the entire world in his mind so he can better represent it later in his paintings, each of which takes up to 3-4 months to complete. Via his website:

I deal exclusively with the urban landscape and aim to present a painted world which in some ways resembles the world we live in. I am fascinated by the city, it’s visual complexity and constant state of flux. The act of painting is an attempt fix this information and give vision to our experience of living within it. [...] The work aims to create credible and convincing space which whilst making reference to our world displays it’s own distinct logic. This space is created through drawing, which I see as fundamental in establishing a world the viewer can engage with. Drawing allows me to make human pictorial decisions instead of relying on the mechanical eye of a camera or software package. This process is open ended and changes from one painting to the next. Whilst I employ a variety of perspectival strategies, these methods are not fixed or rigid in their application. Working with a box of pencils and an eraser I will start by establishing an horizon line on which I will place vanishing points to construct simple linear shapes which become subdivided into more complex arrangements.

You can see numerous final works at a much higher resolution, as well as initial drawings over on his website. Walsh will have work at the Changing Perspectives technology conference in Paris later this month, and is working on a solo show at Bernarducci Meisel Gallery in November.

Amazing Color Pencil Portrait by Amy Robins

Amazing Color Pencil Portrait by Amy Robins portraits photo realism drawing

Amazing Color Pencil Portrait by Amy Robins portraits photo realism drawing

Based on a photograph from Benoit Paille (previously) artist Amy Robins drew this impressive portrait using little more than colored pencils, cartridge paper, and quite a bit of talent. Although there’s just enough style to differentiate the image from a photograph it made me do a double-take. If you liked this also check out the work of Sam Silva.

Illustrator Mark Crilley Shreads a Playing Card and Draws a Photo Realistic Copy

Illustrator Mark Crilley Shreads a Playing Card and Draws a Photo Realistic Copy photo realism illustration drawing cards

Michigan-based author and illustrator Mark Crilley has been working on a series of “realism challenges” on his YouTube channel. In his third installment he tackled the realistic drawing of a torn playing card. Pretty incredible. (via boing boing, thnx brian!)

This is Not a Photograph: Amazing Portrait Drawn with Ballpoint Pens by Samuel Silva

This is Not a Photograph: Amazing Portrait Drawn with Ballpoint Pens by Samuel Silva portraits photo realism drawing

This is Not a Photograph: Amazing Portrait Drawn with Ballpoint Pens by Samuel Silva portraits photo realism drawing

Nope, not a photograph. This is an amazing portrait drawn by 29-year-old Portugal-based attorney Samuel Silva (he says art is just his “hobby”) based on a photograph by Russian photographer Kristina Tararina. Silva’s medium of choice is standard Bic ballpoint pens on paper and this particular portrait uses eight different colors, taking some 30 hours to complete. The drawing went gangbusters on Reddit last night and Silva fields a number of questions about his work over on deviantART. You can see many more of Silva’s drawings here.

Hyper-Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Hyper Realistic Paintings by Steve Mills photo realism painting

Photorealistic painter Steve Mills sold his first painting at the age of 11 and has been known to sell entire shows in about ten minutes. Using oil paints he examines some of life’s most mundane moments as if through a magnifying glass. Via his website:

Influenced by the works of Andrew Wyeth, his early paintings consisted mostly of landscapes. After seeing the work of Richard Estes at a show in Boston, MA, Photorealism became his passion. Today his interests are somewhat varied though his main focus is on the “extraordinarily-ordinary”. Mills takes your eye to a place where most would need a magnifying glass. Getting in so tight the viewer can see the stressed metal in a bottle cap or the texture of a newspaper.

Mills has numerous paintings scanned at a pretty high resolution that you can check out here. (via limber)

Lee Price

Lee Price portraits photo realism painting illustration
Lee Price portraits photo realism painting illustration
Lee Price portraits photo realism painting illustration

Realist oil painter Lee Price (maybe nsfw) primarily paints self-portraits of herself from an overhead vantage point, primarily in bathrooms while eating junk food. Colossal approved. (via yewknee)

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf portraits photo realism embroidery

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf portraits photo realism embroidery

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf portraits photo realism embroidery

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf portraits photo realism embroidery

The embroidery of Daniel Kornrumpf portraits photo realism embroidery

When I started working on Colossal in earnest last August I did’t anticipate the rash of embroidery that would eventually makes its way here. This work by Daniel Kornrumpf is astounding.