Tag Archives: photorealism

New Paintings Which Combine Cubist and Realist Elements by ‘Belin’ 

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón or “Belin” (previously) has long practiced photorealistic murals. It was in 2016 however, that his work began to mutate with the adoption of a cubist style, elongating his subjects’ necks and segmenting their faces in ways that would make Picasso himself proud. Despite the distorted facial features, many of his new works feature recognizable subjects. Belin’s paintings honor some of his great inspirations, displaying the likenesses of painters such as Frida Kahlo, Keith Haring, and Dali, alongside famous subjects such as the Mona Lisa.

Belin’s current solo exhibition is named after his self-created style, Post Neo Cubism, which can be seen at Paris-based 24 Beaubourg through June 25, 2017. You can see more of Belin’s stylistic mash-ups on his website and Instagram. (via Juxtapoz and Arrested Motion)

 

 

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Cubism and Realism Collide in New Murals and Paintings by ‘Belin’ 

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, or Belin, has long been known in the graffiti world for his photorealistic murals. After a recent trip to Pablo Picasso’s birthplace however, his work has begun to adopt elements of cubism—now producing creative portraits in a style he’s dubbed postneocubismo. His works are often based on loved ones, breaking up elements of their faces in order to recompose eyes, ears, and mouths into distorted configurations.

Although many of his newer works have moved to canvas, he is still very much involved with making work in the public realm, like the above mural he created for last year’s Meeting of Styles’ festival in Cancun, Mexico. You can see more of Belin’s work on his website and Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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Hatched from a Discarded Egg on a Chicago Windowsill, ‘Camp’ the Pigeon Becomes a Muse for Adele Renault’s Giant Oil Paintings 

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Follow the daily adventures of Camp the pigeon on Instagram

In the summer of 2013, Chicago artist George Keaton and photographer Mariah Naella were preparing for their engagement party in Wisconsin when they made a seemingly insignificant discovery that would soon dramatically impact their life. Repairmen who were replacing old window frames in their apartment had quietly left something on their kitchen counter: a tiny egg. The workers had inadvertently destroyed a pigeon nest while fixing windows and randomly decided to salvage the egg.

The couple tells the Chicago Sun Times that in the process of discarding the egg outside, Naella realized something was moving inside of it. Within minutes—and to their great astonishment—it almost immediately began to hatch. Late that night the couple purchased a small syringe at Walgreens to use for feeding, and the next few weeks were dedicated to rearing a peppy little pigeon they named Camp.

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Two months later, following advice from a wildlife expert, they decided Camp was large enough to release into the wild, but upon opening the window they discovered he was completely uninterested in leaving. Camp has since become accustomed to flying near their Lincoln Square home, and is free to come and go as he pleases, but has never traveled far and always returns home. The pigeon is now a part of the family, and has become a bit of a local celebrity whose daily adventures are shared on Instagram. He’s even spawned an entire line of prints, jewelry, and and shirts.

On learning about Camp’s story randomly through Instagram, Belgian painter Adele Renault realized she had a new muse. Renault is known for her large-scale photorealistic portraits of people and pigeons, and it wasn’t long before she began documenting the Chicago bird’s adventures in lockstep with Naella and Keaton. A selection of her giant oil on linen paintings depicting Camp during several stages of his life will be on view starting tomorrow at Havas Annex in Chicago. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Artist CJ Hendry Draws 50 Photorealistic Foods in 50 Days 

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Starting in February, Brisbane artist CJ Hendry embarked on an ambitious drawing project, the creation of 50 food drawings in 50 days, with a new piece posted to Instagram every 24 hours. Each black pen drawing of a photorealistic food set against the backdrop of an ornate French plate is rendered with a stunning grasp of shading and depth. You can scroll through the entire collection of photos here, and see some of her earlier large-scale drawings on Analogue/Digital.com.au. (via Boing Boing, The Cool Hunter)

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Thread Paintings: Densely Embroidered Portraits by Cayce Zavaglia 

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When scouring through the minute details of artist Cayce Zavaglia’s embroidered portraits (previously), it’s difficult imagine each work is scarcely larger than 8″ x 10″. Her process, which she refers to as both “thread painting” and “renegade embroidery,” begins with a photoshoot of each subject, namely friends, family, and fellow artists. Roughly 100-150 photos are winnowed down to a single selection which she then begins to embroider with one-ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen. She shares via her artist statement:

Over the years, I have developed a sewing technique that allows me to blend colors and establish tonalities that resemble the techniques used in classical oil painting. The direction in which the threads are sewn mimic the way brush marks are layered within a painting which, in turn, allows for the allusion of depth, volume, and form. My stitching methodology borders on the obsessive, but ultimately allows me to visually evoke painterly renditions of flesh, hair, and cloth.

Zavaglia is also interested with the backs of her portraits, a tangled mesh of thread and knots resembling a more abstract version of the exacting portrait on the reverse. In a return to her roots as a painter, she creates gouache and large format acrylic paintings of the backsides, effectively creating a painting of an emboirdery of a photograph. Included here are several works from the last two years including works that will be on view at Art Miami this December through Lyons Wier Gallery. (via Booooooom)

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Stunning Photo-Realistic Graphite Drawings by Monica Lee 

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Malaysian artist Monica Lee is obsessed with details. But then again, I guess you have to be in order to create some of the most stunning photo-realistic drawings we’ve ever seen. “I like to challenge myself with complex portraits especially people with freckles or beard,” says Lee, who often works from photographic portraits to create seemingly identical drawings. Surprisingly, Lee worked in the digital world for 12 years before making the jump to illustration. But it certainly doesn’t show. She now spends 3-4 weeks on a single drawing. The artist attributes her love for hyperrealism to her father, who worked in the field of photography. You can follow Monica Lee on Facebook or Instagram. She also sells her complex drawings as smartphone cases. (via Illusion, IGNANT)

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left: the girl with glasses by Marteline Nystad | right: Monica Lee’s illustration of the photograph

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