Tag Archives: photoshop

The Attention-Sucking Power of Digital Technology Displayed Through Photography by Antoine Geiger 


All images provided by Antoine Geiger

Making eye contact, a once unavoidable feat when packed into a crowded train car or museum, is now a nearly impossible mission as those around you are almost guaranteed to be sucked into their phone’s screen while scrolling through Facebook or killing digital zombies. Our increasing dependence on the information devices constantly stuck to our hands was the inspiration for artist Antoine Geiger’s series SUR-FAKE, a group of digitally altered photographs depicting random people being sucked into the screens of their phones.

The images show children, businessmen, and tourists with their faces completely lost, the forms stretched like taffy into the portals we use for selfies, email communication, and mindless gaming. The blur imposed by Photoshop completely masks any emotion once seen on the subject’s face, rendering each a personality-less drone. With this altering of the body the artist explains that the project is “placing the screen as an object of ‘mass subculture,’ alienating the relation to our own body, and more generally to the physical world.” All images courtesy Antoine Geiger. (via This Isn’t Happiness)








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Timelapse Video of a Damaged Black & White Portrait Restored and Colorized by Joaquin Villaverde 


From friends who are digital artists, retouchers, or illustrators, I sometimes hear stories of clients who suggest projects should go faster or simply cost less because the software “does it all for you.” While the tools are indeed more efficient and impressive with each new Photoshop or Illustrator release, the skill required to master those tools is still substantial. Case in point, this new time-lapse from Argentinian photographer and retoucher Joaquin Villaverde who demonstrates his Photoshop abilities by giving new life to a severely damaged black and white portrait of a girl. The clip shows two hours of work condensed into three minutes. (via PetaPixel)

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Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop 







For their Street Eraser project artists Tayfun Sarier and Guus ter Beek (who both work at Wieden+Kennedy) created giant adhesive stickers that look like the eraser tool in Photoshop. Once applied to advertisements, graffiti and other objects it appears as if the surface is being erased, revealing Photoshop’s checkerboard background signifying a blank canvas. Fun! (via Designboom)

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Photographer Thomas Jackson (previously) has been working on a new series of images based on the idea of swarms, shooting large hovering masses of objects in locations around New York. He says the idea is still a work in progress and that some of these photos should just be considered “sketches,” but I think they’re really fantastic already. See them a bit larger on his site.

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Composite Photograph Made from 500 Self-Portraits 

Ever since photographer Noah Kalina began his Everyday portrait project 11 years ago (I had no idea he was still actively photographing himself, talk about commitment) there have been hundreds of inspired photogs snapping daily self-portraits. Flickr user clickflashwhir is one of these people, taking hundreds of portraits over the past several years. Tiemen Rapati downloaded 500 of her photos and created this beautiful composite image by finding an average RGB value for each pixel and dividing it by the total number of portraits. I have no idea how this is done, but I bet it involves computers. It’s amazing how surgically accurate she must sit, I assume using her eyes to align each shot. Really stunning. Just a note, though it says Tiemen used 400 photos on Flickr, he averaged in another 100 for this post. (via feltron)

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Where’s your head at 

At its core the basic premise of this photo series by Italian photographer and designer Francesco Brunotti isn’t something tremendously new, that is the digital removal of objects from images, for instance Seats by Jens Sage. But in its art direction and execution something wonderful emerges and I found myself smiling hugely. See his first series, and the second.

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Minuscule by Maite Guerrero 

While we’re on the theme of teeny tiny art, here are some fun photo manipulations by Barcelona-based Maite Guerrero. It’s rare anything digital like this makes it onto Colossal, but there is such care in how each one of these is created, the attention to color, depth, and scale makes these truly special. See more on Behance.

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