pinhole camera

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Art Design Photography

A Homemade Multipoint Pinhole Camera Made from 32,000 Drinking Straws

February 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Using 32,000 black drinking straws, collaborators Michael (Mick) Farrell and Cliff Haynes created the Straw Camera, a homemade camera they began experimenting with in 2007. Despite the connection one might draw to a pinhole camera, the Straw Camera actually functions quite differently, producing a multipoint perspective from an array rather than a single point perspective.

The direct analogue process records the light collected from each straw onto a piece of paper secured to the back of the camera. The camera gives a direct 1:1 view of the subject that is placed before it, however it translates the image to one that mirrors that of pointillist painting, breaking the subject into thousands of little dots.

“In a world beset by selfies with their immediate gratification, and HD television in all its glory feeding our visual appetite, a Straw Camera image of an individual, with its engineering projection and disappearance of the subject into the near fog of visual capture, gives the viewer a glimpse of just how transitory perception is,” said Cliff about the camera.

To read more about the project, check out the photography duo’s website for the Straw Camera, or their book which was published earlier this month. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art Photography

Site-Specific Pinhole Cameras Constructed From Nature Capture the Pacific Northwest

May 3, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Site-specific pinhole image of Pescadero Creek, image via David Janesko

In a meta, Mother Nature-inspired project, artists David Janesko and Adam Donnelly use objects from the earth to photograph the environment from which they are found, often utilizing leaves, logs, dirt, and scattered wood to produce hazy images of the world around them. To date, the pair has made approximately 28 cameras, each with a preexisting lens. Janesko and Donnelly do not create an aperture for the natural cameras by hand, but rather use ones already available in the form of a chewed hole in a leaf or a piece of bark that already has a crack.

The body of the camera is much larger, and like the lens, is only constructed from the material around them, much like a small fort. One of the two will stand outside the camera as a shutter, while the other remains inside with the photographic paper, sometimes for as long as 45 minutes. “We build and photograph with the camera in a single day, we leave the camera as we made it, to fall apart and disappear back into the environment,” Janesko told The Creators Project.

Janesko and Donnelly attempt to capture the physical experience of their cameras in each photograph—producing a muffled and patient image of the lands which they enter. Previously the two had documented the San Francisco Bay Area, but are now heading to the Rio Grande River where their new land cameras will be recorded for an upcoming documentary. You can learn more about the film on their IndieGoGo. (via The Creators Project)

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Pinhole leaf lens, image via David Janesko

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Coachella Valley (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Site-specific pinhole image of Big Basin, image via David Janesko

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Alamere Falls (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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King’s Canyon (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Coachella Valley (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Site-specific pinhole image of Point Reyes Kehoe Beach, image via David Janesko

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Gazo’s Creek (2015), image via Adam Donnelly

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Gazo’s Creek (2015), image via Adam Donnelly