Tag Archives: plants

An Immersive Digitally-Controlled Installation of 2,300 Suspended Flowers by Japanese Art Collective teamLab

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Currently on display in Tokyo is “Floating Flower Garden,” an immersive, interactive installation of blossoming vegetation. Visitors enter a room filled with floating flowers. But as you approach them the flowers rise into the air, creating an air bubble within the dense forest. Multiple visitors can move through the installation at once as the flowers move away from them and surround them. “In this interactive floating flower garden viewers are immersed in flowers, and become completely one with the garden itself.” Think of it as Rain Room but with flowers.

Floating Flower Garden is the latest installation by TeamLab, a Japanese art collective of “ultra-technologists” lead by Toshiyuki Inoko. They’re currently staging a large-scale retrospective of work at Miraikan in Tokyo. The show has been so popular that it got extended for 2 months and this piece was installed as an encore. It’s currently on view, along with the rest of the show, through May 1, 2015.

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This Humidity-Powered Seed Plants Itself by Drilling into the Ground

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Now in contention for the world’s most incredible seed, I give you the seed of the Erodium plant. Powered by humidity, the seed falls to the ground and turns clockwise when wet (or counter-clockwise when dry) to effectively drill itself straight into the ground like a screw. The process here is sped up a bit, but it doesn’t appear to be edited or reversed. (via The Awesomer)

Edible Growth: 3D-Printed Living Food That Grows before You Eat It

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Photo by Bart van Overbeeke

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3D-printed nylon prototype

Edible Growth is an ongoing project by Eindhoven-based food designer Chloé Rutzerveld that blends food, gardening, and 3d printing. The concept involves a specially printed outer casing made from dough that contains “edible soil” and various seeds. Once printed, it takes a few days for the seeds and mushrooms to germinate after which they start to poke out of the small holes on top. All that’s left to do is pop it in your mouth. Rutzerveld’s design is currently just a concept and would involve several years of research, namely around 3d printing technology and issues of food safety. Regardless, it seems like the rest of the project would be fun just to try at home for the sake of novelty. You can read more about Edible Growth on Rutzerveld’s website. (via Dezeen)

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Handmade Resin Bangles Embedded with Flowers and Bark

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Hand-made in Coos Bay, Oregon, these resin bangles are infused with plants, leaves, flowers, shells, and strips of bark. Much of what you see here is available through Faerie and dozens of additional pieces are available through Etsy. (via Crafty Allegieance)

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Elkebana: Symmetrical Flower Wall Trophies Inspired by Japanese ‘Ikebana’ Flower Arrangements

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If you enjoy the aesthetic appeal of animal antlers but hate the idea of taxidermy, Elkebana might be just the thing for your cabin walls. The wall-mounted system relies on symmetrical sets of flowers or tree branches and gets its name from ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement. You can see more over on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Air Plant Jellyfish by ‘PetitBeast’

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LA-based designer and art director Cathy Van Hoang had the novel idea of using sea urchin shells as upside down planters for air plants to create little aerial jellyfish. She sells them in her Etsy shop, PetitBeast. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

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Delicate Vessels Sculpted with Pressed Flowers by Ignacio Canales Aracil

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Spanish artist Ignacio Canales Aracil creates vessels reminiscent of upside-down baskets using nothing but pressed flowers. The art of flower pressing dates back thousands of years; pressed flowers were reportedly discovered in a 3,000-year-old coffin of Tutankhamun’s mother in Egypt, and both Greek and Roman botanists were known to preserve plants using techniques that continue today. But Aracil’s method is a bit different, relying on large cone-shaped molds into which carefully woven patches of hand-picked flower stems are placed. The pieces dry for up to a month without the aid of adhesives and are sprayed with a light varnish to protect the sculpture from moisture. The final pieces, which could be crushed with even the slightest weight, are rigid enough to stand without support.

Aracil currently has work as part of a group show at Lucia Mendoza gallery in Madrid through the end of February, and you can see much more over on his website.

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