Tag Archives: plants

Glass Insects and Plants Sculpted to Scale by Japanese Artist Yuki Tsunoda 

Molding tiny bits of soft Moretti glass with equally small tools, Japanese sculptor Yuki Tsunoda produces insects, flowers, and other types of plants at a size that is nearly to scale. Her subject matter is sparked by her interest to dissuade gut feelings of disgust when it comes to insects, and create works that highlight the beauty of their individual parts.

In addition to Moretti glass, Tsunoda achieves the metallic luminosity often found on insects’ wings and other parts of the body by incorporating dichroic glass and a form of quartz known as aventurine. You can view more of the 26-year-old artist’s miniature bugs and other scale glass works on her Twitter, or purchase one for yourself by going to her online shop. (via Spoon&Tamago)

  

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Patiently Arranged Dandelion Works by Botanical Artist Duy Anh Nhan Duc 

"Air" (2016), all images via Duy Anh Nhan Duc

All images via Duy Anh Nhan Duc

Self-taught botanical artist Duy Anh Nhan Duc uses a steady hand to arrange dandelion blossoms in artful imitations of their flight through the air. His monochrome works are each reminiscent of a universal childhood urge to scatter a dandelion’s seedlings with a single blow, eager to watch the feathery pieces take flight in the wind. With this in mind he carefully dissects a dandelion’s fluff, placing the individual seeds in concentric patterns. In many works gold leaf is used to single out some of the miniature components, adding another layer of precision to his patiently executed fields of flora.

His solo exhibition, The Imaginary Herbarium, is currently on view at Galerie Bettina in Paris through February 15, 2017. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website. (thnx, Laura!)

"Air" (2016)

"Air" (2016)

 

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Otherworldly Mixed-Media Plants Sprout Like Creatures from a Dr. Seuss Book 

In her ongoing sculptural series titled “The Marriage,” Malaysian artist Noreen Loh Hui Miun merges elements from real and fictional plantlife to create entirely new species. The fragile works begin with dried plant components like branches and moss to which she adds cut laminate petals reminiscent of reptile scales and other colorful components. Though not intentional, the finished works look something like the wild imaginings of children’s book author Dr. Seuss. You can see more pieces by Miun on Facebook.

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Dazzling Images of Glowing Flowers Photographed With Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence 

28-year-old photographer Craig Burrows photographs plants and flowers using a type a photography called UVIVF or “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence.” If you haven’t heard of it, that’s not a surprise, as it is a relatively unknown process which brings out the glowing fluoresce in plant matter through the use of high-intensity UV lights.

Typically UV is removed through a camera’s lens, however Burrows photographs with a 365nm LED light which is passed through a filter to transmit only UV and infrared light. The dazzling plant life Burrows’ photographs absorbs this UV light and releases visible light at different wavelengths, which allows him to capture colors far more vivid than those seen in a typical viewing condition.

Although Burrows has limited his photography to singular flowers and small arrangements, his next step is aimed at illuminating entire scenes, like gardens, glades, and greenhouses, with 100-watt floodlights. You can see more of the Southern California-based photographer’s glowing plant portraits on his Flickr and portfolio site. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Bespoke Stained Glass Succulents by Lesley Green 

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Influenced by elements of both architecture and illustration, artist Lesley Green (owner of Bespoke Glass) channels modern design while working with stained glass and glass tile. Her works have traditionally been quite geometric, however recently she has focused on more organic shapes, like in her latest series of succulent-based sculptures. These stained glass works mirror different types of cacti and agave plants, refracting beautiful light patterns through their green-tinted forms.

“I want to push the technical boundaries of stained glass, and love the challenge of figuring out how to solve problems, such as creating open spaces in a pattern,” said Green in an interview with Etsy. “Pattern and color are very important to me. I’m most often inspired by textiles in that respect.”

You can see more of her cacti creations and other glass tiles works on her Instagram and Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

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Porcelain Sculptures Inspired by English and Japanese Botanics by Hitomi Hosono 

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Merging botanical forms from England with the delicate plant shapes from her childhood in Japan, ceramic artist Hitomi Hosono produces delicate layered sculptures that appear as frozen floral arrangements. Often monochromatic, the works are focused on carved detail rather than color—repetition of form making each piece uniquely beautiful.

“The subjects of my current porcelain works are shapes inspired by leaves and flowers,” said Hosono in an artist statement. “I study botanical forms in the garden. I find myself drawn to the intricacy of plants, examining the veins of a leaf, how its edges are shaped, the layering of a flower’s petals. I look, I touch, I draw.”

Hosono’s plant-inspired works were recently exhibited with Adrian Sassoon gallery during The Salon Art + Design fair in NYC November 9-13, 2016. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as in the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop. (via cfile.daily)

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