Tag Archives: plants

Ceramic Cephalopod and Jellyfish Air Plant Holders by Cindy and James Searles

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California-based artists Cindy and James Searles make call kinds of handmade ceramic air plant holders in the form of jellyfish, squid, octopi, and other underwater creatures. They come in shapes in size way too numerous to show here, you can see more in their shop. If you liked this, also check out Cathy Van Hoang’s urchin shell air planters.

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Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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Recycled PET Plastic Bottle Plant Sculptures by Veronika Richterová

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

Czech artist Veronika Richterová creates new life from repurposed plastic PET bottles. For the last decade the artist has used various methods of cutting, heating, and assemblage to build colorfully translucent forms of everything from crocodiles to chandelier light fixtures to plants. Her obsession with plastic bottles doesn’t stop with creating artwork, Richterová has also collected over 3,000 PET plastic objects from 76 countries and writes extensively about the history and usage of plastic in her article A Tribute to PET Bottles. You can see hundreds more sculptures in her online gallery. (via Mister Finch, Lustik)

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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Photo by Michal Cihlář

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An Immersive Digitally-Controlled Installation of 2,300 Suspended Flowers by Japanese Art Collective teamLab

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Currently on display in Tokyo is “Floating Flower Garden,” an immersive, interactive installation of blossoming vegetation. Visitors enter a room filled with floating flowers. But as you approach them the flowers rise into the air, creating an air bubble within the dense forest. Multiple visitors can move through the installation at once as the flowers move away from them and surround them. “In this interactive floating flower garden viewers are immersed in flowers, and become completely one with the garden itself.” Think of it as Rain Room but with flowers.

Floating Flower Garden is the latest installation by TeamLab, a Japanese art collective of “ultra-technologists” lead by Toshiyuki Inoko. They’re currently staging a large-scale retrospective of work at Miraikan in Tokyo. The show has been so popular that it got extended for 2 months and this piece was installed as an encore. It’s currently on view, along with the rest of the show, through May 1, 2015.

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This Humidity-Powered Seed Plants Itself by Drilling into the Ground

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Now in contention for the world’s most incredible seed, I give you the seed of the Erodium plant. Powered by humidity, the seed falls to the ground and turns clockwise when wet (or counter-clockwise when dry) to effectively drill itself straight into the ground like a screw. The process here is sped up a bit, but it doesn’t appear to be edited or reversed. (via The Awesomer)

Edible Growth: 3D-Printed Living Food That Grows before You Eat It

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Photo by Bart van Overbeeke

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Edible Growth is an ongoing project by Eindhoven-based food designer Chloé Rutzerveld that blends food, gardening, and 3d printing. The concept involves a specially printed outer casing made from dough that contains “edible soil” and various seeds. Once printed, it takes a few days for the seeds and mushrooms to germinate after which they start to poke out of the small holes on top. All that’s left to do is pop it in your mouth. Rutzerveld’s design is currently just a concept and would involve several years of research, namely around 3d printing technology and issues of food safety. Regardless, it seems like the rest of the project would be fun just to try at home for the sake of novelty. You can read more about Edible Growth on Rutzerveld’s website. (via Dezeen)

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Handmade Resin Bangles Embedded with Flowers and Bark

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Hand-made in Coos Bay, Oregon, these resin bangles are infused with plants, leaves, flowers, shells, and strips of bark. Much of what you see here is available through Faerie and dozens of additional pieces are available through Etsy. (via Crafty Allegieance)

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