Tag Archives: plants

Handmade Ceramic Animal Planters by Cumbuca Chic

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If you’ve been on the hunt for the perfect ceramic capybara planter, look no further. Ceramicist Priscilla Ramos from São Paulo, Brazil, has a fantastic line of animal planters in the form of foxes, whales, anteaters, and yes, even the world’s largest rodent. She’s even working on a sloth! The handmade stoneware pieces are perfect for small succulents or cacti, and you can see more in her shop: Cumbuca Chic. (via NOTCOT)

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Remarkable Footage of Plants That Explode to Disperse Their Seeds

The Smithsonian Channel just shared this brief new clip of three plant species that use different methods of propulsion to spread their seeds. The filmmakers captured slow motion footage of violets, touch me nots, and poisonous squirting cucumbers (!) as they explode in some pretty incredible ways. (via Boing Boing, The Kid Should See This)

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Painstaking Arrangements of Colorful Objects and Food by Emily Blincoe

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Tennessee-based photographer Emily Blincoe (previously) continues to create some of the most meticulously arranged collections of objects we’ve seen. From leaves and flowers to cereal and trash, the photographer is capable of making visually soothing layouts of almost any object. One of Blincoe’s latest projects is the Collection Collection featuring portraits of people laying down against their personal collections of things like rocks or figurines. You can follow her work on Instagram, and many of the images you see here are available as prints in her shop. (via Bored Panda)

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Delicate Glass Sea Life Sculptures by Emily Williams

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Glass Seaweed, 2014, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 20″ x 20″ x 20″

American artist Emily Williams draws inspiration from the sea and other aspects of organic life for the creation of her fragile glass sculptures that mimic seaweed, jellyfish, and coral. Each piece begins with a selection of perfectly straight borosilicate glass rods in various diameters which she carefully melts with a glass torch to form patterns similar to veins and branches.

As a child, Williams’ grandmother was a docent at the Smithsonian leading to many artistic and scientific discoveries at a very young age that would deeply influence her decision to pursue an artistic career. She went on to receive her MFA in sculpture from Washington University in St. Louis and a BFA in sculpture from V.C.U. in Richmond. She is currently working on an impressive glass coral piece shown in the video below (and discussed in this blog post), and you can see more views of her work both on Facebook and in her portfolio.

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Glass Seaweed, detail

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Glass Coral Skeleton, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 20″ x 22″ x 10″

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Glass Nest, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 20″ x 20″

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Glass Jellyfish, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 14″ x 14″

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Glass Petal, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 15″ x 12″ x 4″

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Petal, detail

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Burst, 2013, Flameworked borosilicate glass, 12″ x 10″ x 10″

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Hyper-realistic Cactus Paintings that Bristle with Detail by Kwang-Ho Lee

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Cactus No.69, 2011, Oil on canvas, 162.1×130.3cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery.

With deftly applied strokes of paint scarely wider than a hair, Korean painter Kwang-Ho Lee creates towering renderings of cacti that bristle with thorns and tangled branches. The colorful oil paintings can reach up to 8 feet tall, an imposing scale with ample room for tediously composed details that push each work into the realm of hyperrealism. You can explore more of Lee’s work at Johyun Gallery, Artsy, and Atelier Aki. (via Juxtapoz, Hi-Fructose, Beautiful/Decay)

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Cactus No.51,2010,Oil on Canvas,194x200cm, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.73, oil on canvas 193.9×130.3cm 2011, courtesy Atelier Aki

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Cactus No.59, oil on canvas, 259.1x170cm, 2011, courtesy Johyun Gallery

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Cactus No.35, oil on canvas 162x130cm 2009, courtesy Atelier Aki

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Cactus No.35, detail

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“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

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“Touch” Exhibition at Joyhun Gallery, 2011

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Ceramic Cephalopod and Jellyfish Air Plant Holders by Cindy and James Searles

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California-based artists Cindy and James Searles make call kinds of handmade ceramic air plant holders in the form of jellyfish, squid, octopi, and other underwater creatures. They come in shapes in size way too numerous to show here, you can see more in their shop. If you liked this, also check out Cathy Van Hoang’s urchin shell air planters.

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Transport a Miniature Garden by Bike or Necklace with Colleen Jordan’s 3D Printed Planters

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Colleen Jordan’s Easter egg-hued vases are the perfect springtime accessory. Built in miniature, her creations are sized to carry small succulents or pocket-sized flower arrangements on one’s neckline, lapel, finger, or bicycle handle. The Atlanta-based designer and artist recently made Wearable Planter her full time gig, and each piece is influenced by the many places she has lived—including Sweden, Hawaii, and South Carolina. Jordan explains that through her business she strives to “create things to make life more pleasant.”

Each planter is 3D printed out of nylon and dyed individually. The planters are also sealed with acrylic varnish to keep out rain and maintain their bright color. Most of the vessels are designed with a flat bottom so they can also decorate your table or desk while not being worn. Jordan’s tiny planters can be purchased via her Etsy, and other crafts and miscellanea can be viewed on the Wearable Planter Instagram. (via iGNANT)

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