plants

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Art

Soaring Murals of Plants on Urban Walls by Mona Caron

February 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Muralist Mona Caron (previously) has continued her worldwide Weeds series, with colorful renderings of humble plants growing ever taller on buildings from Portland and São Paulo to Spain and Taiwan. The San Francisco-based artist often partners with local and international social and environmental movements for climate justice, labor rights, and water rights, and selects plants, both native and invasive, that she finds in the cities where she paints. Caron also integrates tiny details into the main visual elements of her murals:

Several of these murals contain intricate miniature details, invisible from afar. These typically narrate the local history, chronicle the social life of the mural’s immediate surroundings, and visualize future possibility, and are created in a process that incorporates ideas emerging through spontaneous conversations with the artwork’s hosting communities while painting.

Caron regularly shares process videos and photos of completed works on Instagram, and she delves into the narratives behind several of her murals on her website.

Collaboration with Liqan

 

 



Photography

New Sparkling Blooms Photographed with Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence by Craig Burrows

January 31, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Photographer Craig Burrows (previously) continues to explore a unique photography method called ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence that uses high-intensity UV lights to excite fluorescence found in some plants, animals, and various objects. Burrows chooses to focus on flowers, creating colorfully vivid interpretations of jade blooms, daisies, and irises that seem to practically glow from within.

Upcoming exhibitions of the artist’s work include the Preview of the Spring 2018 Flower Show in Greenwich CT and the col.lab gallery at Tokyo Polytechnic University. Burrows shares with Colossal that he is currently looking for venues to shoot larger scenes with UVIVF in addition to his existing body of work with smaller objects. You can follow more of his work on Flickr.

 

 



Art Craft

Carved and Embroidered Leaves by Hillary Fayle

January 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Hillary Fayle (previously here and here) slices and stitches patterns into found leaves, producing elegant designs that strike a delicate balance between natural specimens and the human hand. The works range from minimal tweaks to individual leaves to more involved patterns that link several in one embroidery. Fayle hopes each piece is an encouragement to look at nature a little closer and consider the potential for harmony in objects often overlooked.

“I want to salvage and revive our connection to the natural world,” explains Fayle in an artist statement on her website.  “…Both tender and ruthless, this intricate and sensitive work implies that our relationship to nature is both tenuously fragile and infinitely complex.”

You can see more of Fayle’s leaf embroidery, as well as some new experiments with snake scales, on her Instagram and website.

 

 



Art

Towering Hyperrealistic Cactus Paintings by Lee Kwang-ho

December 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Cactus No.95, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Korean painter Kwang-ho Lee (previously) depicts larger-than-life cacti in oil paintings that stand up to 8-feet tall. Every thorn, bloom, and branch is painted with excruciating accuracy, bringing the most minute elements into hyperrealistic focus. Lee studied painting at Seoul National University and is represented by Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1266, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 6202, 2016. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Untitled 1212, 2017. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 93, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 91, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 92, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 98, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 71, 2011. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

Cactus No. 96, 2015. Oil on canvas. Courtesy Johyun Gallery.

 

 



Craft Food

Garden Vegetable and Plant Embroideries by Veselka Bulkan

November 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Embroidery artist Veselka Bulkan (previously) continues to produce carefully embroidered works of root-bound plants found in gardens. The pieces all interact with hoops in various ways, from potted plants and potatoes that dangle from the edge to dandelions that stretch between two hoops. Bulkan has also been taking commissions for a series of ultrasound embroideries, and many of her original pieces are available in her shop.

 

 



Art

New Porcelain Vessels Densely Layered in Leaf Sprigs and Other Botanical Forms by Hitomi Hosono

November 21, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono (previously) creates porcelain vessels layered in hundreds of leaf sprigs and other botanical forms. These monochromatic elements are based on plants Hosono encounters during walks through East London’s greenery. “It is my intention to transfer the leaf’s beauty and detail into my ceramic work,” she explains, using it as my own language to weave new stories for objects.”

Her technique is inspired by Jasperware, a type of stoneware covered in thin ceramic reliefs invented by Josiah Wedgwood in the late 18th century. Like Wedgwood, she carefully applies her delicate forms to a porcelain base. From start to finish a larger work will take Hosono nearly a year and a half to complete. Much of this time is spent drying, as her densely layered works often need 10-12 months to completely dry.

Hosono’s solo exhibition, Reimagining Nature: Hitomi Hosono’s Memories in Porcelain, is currently on view at the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation in London through December 15, 2017. You can see more of her layered botanical sculptures on the artist’s website and through her gallery Adrian Sassoon.

 

 



Art Craft

New Paper & Textile Wildlife Sculptures by Kate Kato

November 7, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Botanical paper artist Kate Kato (previously) continues to use found and recycled paper to build intricate natural dioramas. A buzzing hive of bees makes a home in a matchbox, vintage books are overgrown with paper fungi and colorful wildflowers, and a shadow box is filled with butterflies and beetles. Rather than striving for exact scientific replication, Kato allows the original material to show through, lending a spirit of handcrafted whimsy to her work. Some of the pieces seen here can be purchased through Etsy, and you can explore more of the Wales-based artist’s work on Facebook, and Instagram.