Tag Archives: porcelain

Porcelain Vessels Inspired by the Ocean Sculpted by Jennifer McCurdy 

mccurdy-6

Guided in her ceramics studio by nature’s symmetrical and asymmetrical forms, artist Jennifer McCurdy works with inspiration from everyday objects, producing vessels that imitate natural specimens such as malformed conch shells and burst milkweed pods. Her sculptures are habitually one color, a white the same shade as the ocean’s surf. Keeping a very limited palette allows McCurdy to highlight the hollow areas of her pieces, casting shadows from her chiseled patterns.

“I use a translucent porcelain body because it has a beautiful surface, and it conveys the qualities of light and shadow that I wish to express,” said McCurdy in her artist statement. “After throwing my vessel on the potter’s wheel, I alter the form to set up a movement of soft shadow. When the porcelain is leather hard, I carve patterns to add energy and counterpoint. I fire my work to cone 10, where the porcelain becomes non-porous and translucent.”

McCurdy occasionally adds 23 carat gold leaf detail to the inside of her pieces, allowing them to glow from the inside. You can see more of her ocean-inspired vessels on her website, as well as within the pages of the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop.

mccurdy-7

mccurdy-4

mccurdy-5

mccurdy-8

mccurdy-2

mccurdy-1

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Porcelain Sculptures Inspired by English and Japanese Botanics by Hitomi Hosono 

hitomi_hosono_02

hitomi_hosono_01

Merging botanical forms from England with the delicate plant shapes from her childhood in Japan, ceramic artist Hitomi Hosono produces delicate layered sculptures that appear as frozen floral arrangements. Often monochromatic, the works are focused on carved detail rather than color—repetition of form making each piece uniquely beautiful.

“The subjects of my current porcelain works are shapes inspired by leaves and flowers,” said Hosono in an artist statement. “I study botanical forms in the garden. I find myself drawn to the intricacy of plants, examining the veins of a leaf, how its edges are shaped, the layering of a flower’s petals. I look, I touch, I draw.”

Hosono’s plant-inspired works were recently exhibited with Adrian Sassoon gallery during The Salon Art + Design fair in NYC November 9-13, 2016. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as in the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop. (via cfile.daily)

hitomi_hosono_07

hitomi_hosono_08

hitomi_hosono_05

hitomi_hosono_04

hitomi_hosono_11

hosono-1

hosono-2

hosono-3

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Stretched and Contorted Porcelain Face Sculptures by Johnson Tsang 

tsang-1

Stretching the properties of porcelain clay to the max, artist Johnson Tsang (previously) contorts the faces of his anonymous sculptures into rubber. The comical works morph facial features and body parts, at times cramming the identities of multiple persons into a single being. These new pieces from his “Lucid Dreams” series were recently on view at the Hong Kong Sculpture Biennial as part of Art Asia 2016. You can see the rest of them here.

tsang-2

tsang-3

tsang-4

tsang-5

tsang-6

tsang-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Densely Textured Sculptures Produced From Thousands of Porcelain Spines by Artist Zemer Peled 

zemerpeled_04

Using thousands of handcrafted porcelain shards, Israeli born artist Zemer Peled (previously here and here) produces large-scale sculptures that are densely textured. The works change depending on one’s stance, at once looking as if they are made with soft feathers or sharp spines. In either circumstance the pieces reflect the natural world, imitating swirling wind patterns or rolling planes of grass.

“The forms are never static; the visual dance of sharp ceramic parts conveys a sense of constant movement,” explains Mark Moore Gallery. “Like a murmuration of starlings, the sculptures appear to shift shapes as you move around them, an identity becoming and unbecoming in front of you.”

A solo exhibition of Peled’s work, “Nomad,” is currently on display at Mark Moore Gallery in Los Angeles through October 29. You can see more of the artists work on her website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

zemerpeled_07

zemerpeled_08

zemerpeled_02

zemerpeled_09

zemerpeled_10

zemerpeled_01

zemerpeled_11

zemerpeled_12

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Porcelain Vessels Pummeled in Unfortunate Accidents by Laurent Craste 

LaurentCraste_02

Montreal-based artist Laurent Craste (previously) has a penchant for decorative objects, exploring their meaning by more or less beating up the porcelain sculptures. Craste intervenes with history, morphing the staid and decorative nature of each vase or dish into a moment of comical misfortune. These accidents that are not necessarily happy ones, but ones that involve knives, bats, and nails penetrating each piece.

“I regard the inventory of original models from the main 18th and 19th century European porcelain manufacturers and use these models as a basis for research on the status of the collectibles, by subjecting them to a practice of deconstruction and violent alteration of their formal structures, or by contaminating their traditional decorations through a subversive process of subject substitution,” said Craste in his artist statement.

Some of Craste’s work was recently featured by Back Gallery Project at the Seattle Art Fair from August 4-7. You can see more damaged vessels on his website. (via Fubiz)

porcelain-xtra-3

LaurentCraste_06

LaurentCraste_01

porcelain-extra-2

porcelain-xtra-1

LaurentCraste_05

LaurentCraste_07

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New Surgically Sliced Porcelain Dishes Reveal Vibrant Floral Insides 

plates-7

With layers of porcelain surgically peeled back like skin, UK artist Beccy Ridsdel (previously) reveals the colorful internal workings of ceramic dishes. The artist refers to the pieces as “dissections in progress” and displayed earlier iterations alongside actual surgical implements to further heighten their anatomical nature. Titled “Under the Surface,” the ongoing series suggests each porcelain cup or plate has an internal biology of floral decorations that can be explored by removing bits of exterior. Many of Ridsdel’s latest pieces are currently available in her online shop.

plates-1

plates-2

plates-3

plates-4

plates-5

plates-6

plates-8

plates-9

plates-10

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Page 1 of 51234...»