Tag Archives: porcelain

Mirror Coffee Cups by ‘D-Bros’ Reflect Patterns on Saucers

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Created by Japanese design brand D-Bros (previously) these carefully hand-crafted coffee/tea mugs made from Hasami porcelain are painted with a thin layer of reflective palladium that allows each cup to mirror the saucer it rests on. D-Bros created many different geometric designs, some of which are available over at Spoon & Tamago.

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Hand-Built Porcelain Sculptures by Nuala O’Donovan Mimic Fractal Patterns Found in Nature

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Irish artist Nuala O’Donovan sculpts intricate hand-built porcelain forms that resemble fractal patterns found in nature. Borrowing from shapes found in coral, teasel flowers, and pinecones, O’Donovan examines not only patterns, but irregularities that arise from random or unexpected events. From her artist statement:

The result of using the characteristics of fractal geometry in making decisions regarding the form of the sculptural pieces, is that the form is resolved but retains a sense of potential change. The viewer engages with the piece by allowing their own visual experiences to influence their view of the outcome of the form and its future possibilities. I hope that this aspect of my work also evokes the transitory quality of living organisms, combining traces of history, the present and the future, in the patterns that make up their surfaces and forms.

O’Donovan most recently exhibited with Tansey Contemporary at SOFA Chicago and has numerous exhibitions around the UK in 2015. You can see much more on her Facebook page and her website. Photos by Sylvain Deleu and Janice O’Connell. (via Juxtapoz)

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Bathroom Fixtures at Alcatraz Transformed into Porcelain Floral Bouquets by Ai Weiwei

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom (2014). All photos by Jan Sturman

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

Ai Weiwei, Blossom, 2014 (installation detail, Alcatraz Hospital)

The Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei currently has an exhibition on Alcatraz, the notorious island used as a military fortress and federal penitentiary. Amongst a large body of work created specifically for Alcatraz is “Blossom,” which has been installed in several hospital ward cells and medical offices. And as its name suggests, intricately detailed encrustations of ceramic flowers are blossoming out of sinks, toilets and tubs that were once used by hospitalized prisoners.

The curator offers two possibilities in interpreting Ai’s porcelain blossoms: a symbolic offering of comfort to the imprisoned or perhaps an ironic nod to China’s famous Hundred Flowers Campaign of 1956. But to understand the piece we think this quote by Ai himself is all you really need: “The misconception of totalitarianism is that freedom can be imprisoned. This is not the case. When you constrain freedom, freedom will take flight and land on a windowsill.”

Ai Weiwei’s exhibition on Alcatraz will be open through April 26, 2015. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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New Vintage Porcelain Dishes Crawling with Hand-Painted Ants by Evelyn Bracklow

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German artist Evelyn Bracklow of La Philie has created an entire new collection of ant-covered porcelain dishes and tableware since we first shared her work here early this year. Many of the new pieces are part of a unique partnership between the artist, Rijks Museum in the Netherlands, and Etsy. The pieces are hand-painted in Bracklow’s studio, signed, numbered and fired to 160 degrees. As unsettling as having insects permanently invading your dinnerware is, I can’t help but be enchanted by how perfectly crafted they are. You can see more of Bracklow’s recent work here.

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A Pair of Kissing Porcelain Vases by Johnson Tsang

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Ceramic artist Johnson Tsang (previously) created a pair of porcelain vases that when cut along the edges reveal the profiles of people. Smoosh two together and you have instant ceramic love. See more of Tsang’s process over on his blog, and if you liked this also check out the Profilograph by Pablo Garcia.

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Porcelain Busts Imprinted with Chinese Decorative Designs by Ah Xian

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Chinese artist Ah Xian lives and works in Sydney where for nearly two decades he has explored aspects of the human form using ancient Chinese craft methods including porcelain, lacquer, jase, bronze, and even concrete. The artist often uses busts of his own family members including his wife, brother, and father onto which he imprints traditional designs with a vivid cobalt blue glaze. Via Asia Society:

These sculptures by Ah Xian establish a series of multilayered oppositions. The most overt is the tension between the sculptural form of the bust and the painted surface designs, which the artist likens to the oppositions of West and East. The bust is part of a Western portraiture tradition dating back to the busts of ancient Roman times and the designs are derived from Chinese decorative traditions, unique to China and in some cases to the studio-kilns at Jingdezhen. Such an opposition can also be seen as the relationship between the personal (since many of the busts are of Ah Xian’s family, including his wife, brother, and father) and the political (a statement about the artist’s own Chinese heritage articulated outside China).

The works collected here are mostly from his Human Human and China China series, though you can see many more works on Craft Australia. (via I Need a Guide)

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Dancing Shadow Sculptures by Dpt. and Laurent Craste [Updated]

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Parade is an interactive art installation concevied by ceramacist Laurent Craste and digital agency Dpt. for the Chromatic festival in Montreal. At first glance the piece looks rather mundane: two misshapen porcelain vases sit atop a pedestal inside a wood cube, lit from above by an industrial light. But move the light and suddenly the magic happens as shadows projected from the vases animate to life. What a fun piece.

Update: Of course things like this are never as simple as they appear. Dpt. explains further that the animated “shadows” are coming from a hidden projector which tracks the movements of the faux light source. We’ve been tricked! But I suppose that’s kind of the point.

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