Tag Archives: porcelain

New Porcelain Sculptures That Merge Female Forms With Elements of Nature by Juliette Clovis 

“Atsu Bashiri”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze, red and gold hand painted. 34x35x24cm

French artist Juliette Clovis (previously) works primarily with female busts, mutating the forms to adopt animal or floral-based characteristics. Using both the 2D application of paint, and 3D addition of ceramics, she covers the females that she sculpts in horns, quills, and blooms. In some works the natural elements look as if they merge with the bust, while others appear overtaken, such as in the piece Memento mori (2016). In this piece Clovis’ white figure is almost entirely covered in flowers, with minimal elements of her face barely peaking out from its blanket of ceramic blossoms.

Clovis will have a solo exhibition of her work at Gallery Mondapart in Paris titled “Baroque Curiosities” opening March 23 and running through May 4, 2017. You can see more images of Clovis’ hybrid porcelain forms on her Instagram and website. (via Faith is Torment)

“Atsu Bashiri”, detail.

“Atsu Bashiri”, detail.

“Memento mori”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze and white biscuit.

“Memento mori”, 2016.

“Mazama”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze, blue cobalt hand painted.

“Mazama”, detail.

“Heteractis magnifica”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white biscuit and white glaze.

“Heteractis magnifica”, detail.

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Porcelain Vessels Inspired by the Ocean Sculpted by Jennifer McCurdy 

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Guided in her ceramics studio by nature’s symmetrical and asymmetrical forms, artist Jennifer McCurdy works with inspiration from everyday objects, producing vessels that imitate natural specimens such as malformed conch shells and burst milkweed pods. Her sculptures are habitually one color, a white the same shade as the ocean’s surf. Keeping a very limited palette allows McCurdy to highlight the hollow areas of her pieces, casting shadows from her chiseled patterns.

“I use a translucent porcelain body because it has a beautiful surface, and it conveys the qualities of light and shadow that I wish to express,” said McCurdy in her artist statement. “After throwing my vessel on the potter’s wheel, I alter the form to set up a movement of soft shadow. When the porcelain is leather hard, I carve patterns to add energy and counterpoint. I fire my work to cone 10, where the porcelain becomes non-porous and translucent.”

McCurdy occasionally adds 23 carat gold leaf detail to the inside of her pieces, allowing them to glow from the inside. You can see more of her ocean-inspired vessels on her website, as well as within the pages of the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop.

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Porcelain Sculptures Inspired by English and Japanese Botanics by Hitomi Hosono 

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Merging botanical forms from England with the delicate plant shapes from her childhood in Japan, ceramic artist Hitomi Hosono produces delicate layered sculptures that appear as frozen floral arrangements. Often monochromatic, the works are focused on carved detail rather than color—repetition of form making each piece uniquely beautiful.

“The subjects of my current porcelain works are shapes inspired by leaves and flowers,” said Hosono in an artist statement. “I study botanical forms in the garden. I find myself drawn to the intricacy of plants, examining the veins of a leaf, how its edges are shaped, the layering of a flower’s petals. I look, I touch, I draw.”

Hosono’s plant-inspired works were recently exhibited with Adrian Sassoon gallery during The Salon Art + Design fair in NYC November 9-13, 2016. You can see more of her work on her website, as well as in the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop. (via cfile.daily)

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Stretched and Contorted Porcelain Face Sculptures by Johnson Tsang 

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Stretching the properties of porcelain clay to the max, artist Johnson Tsang (previously) contorts the faces of his anonymous sculptures into rubber. The comical works morph facial features and body parts, at times cramming the identities of multiple persons into a single being. These new pieces from his “Lucid Dreams” series were recently on view at the Hong Kong Sculpture Biennial as part of Art Asia 2016. You can see the rest of them here.

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Densely Textured Sculptures Produced From Thousands of Porcelain Spines by Artist Zemer Peled 

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Using thousands of handcrafted porcelain shards, Israeli born artist Zemer Peled (previously here and here) produces large-scale sculptures that are densely textured. The works change depending on one’s stance, at once looking as if they are made with soft feathers or sharp spines. In either circumstance the pieces reflect the natural world, imitating swirling wind patterns or rolling planes of grass.

“The forms are never static; the visual dance of sharp ceramic parts conveys a sense of constant movement,” explains Mark Moore Gallery. “Like a murmuration of starlings, the sculptures appear to shift shapes as you move around them, an identity becoming and unbecoming in front of you.”

A solo exhibition of Peled’s work, “Nomad,” is currently on display at Mark Moore Gallery in Los Angeles through October 29. You can see more of the artists work on her website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

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