Tag Archives: porcelain

Porcelain Vessels Pummeled in Unfortunate Accidents by Laurent Craste 

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Montreal-based artist Laurent Craste (previously) has a penchant for decorative objects, exploring their meaning by more or less beating up the porcelain sculptures. Craste intervenes with history, morphing the staid and decorative nature of each vase or dish into a moment of comical misfortune. These accidents that are not necessarily happy ones, but ones that involve knives, bats, and nails penetrating each piece.

“I regard the inventory of original models from the main 18th and 19th century European porcelain manufacturers and use these models as a basis for research on the status of the collectibles, by subjecting them to a practice of deconstruction and violent alteration of their formal structures, or by contaminating their traditional decorations through a subversive process of subject substitution,” said Craste in his artist statement.

Some of Craste’s work was recently featured by Back Gallery Project at the Seattle Art Fair from August 4-7. You can see more damaged vessels on his website. (via Fubiz)

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New Surgically Sliced Porcelain Dishes Reveal Vibrant Floral Insides 

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With layers of porcelain surgically peeled back like skin, UK artist Beccy Ridsdel (previously) reveals the colorful internal workings of ceramic dishes. The artist refers to the pieces as “dissections in progress” and displayed earlier iterations alongside actual surgical implements to further heighten their anatomical nature. Titled “Under the Surface,” the ongoing series suggests each porcelain cup or plate has an internal biology of floral decorations that can be explored by removing bits of exterior. Many of Ridsdel’s latest pieces are currently available in her online shop.

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Porcelain Female Forms That Blur the Line Between Humans and Nature by Juliette Clovis 

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All images via Juliette Clovis

French artist Juliette Clovis produces hybrid works that merge nature, history, and myth with the female form, covering simple porcelain busts in wildlife, flora, and spikes. Her additions are either painted on or applied to mask the face, obscuring features like abnormal growths. These ambiguous females question the power that is split between humans and nature, toeing a line between being gentle and unnerving. You can see more images of Clovis’ porcelain three-dimensional forms on her Instagram and website. (via Artist a Day)

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Shattered Porcelain Fragments Fused With Gold by Artist Yeesookyung 

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches, all images via Locks Gallery

Korean artist Yeesookyung masterfully produces imperfect sculptures, bulbous yet elegant works composed from mismatched porcelain. The series, titled “Translated Vase,” was first inspired by the Korean artisan tradition of destroying porcelain works that are not deemed pristine, and she has continued to make the fused pieces since 2001. Intrigued by these tossed aside works and shards, Yee began saving fragmented tea cups and pots rejected by contemporary masters. Honoring the works’ dismantled states, she traces each crevice in 24-karat gold leaf in the style of Japanese kintsugi, merging the unwanted works together in a way that heightens the beauty of their distress. In this way she blends diverse methods to form a contemporary process that evokes both the elegant designs of her homeland and the delicate rebuilding of damaged works in Japanese tradition.

Yee received her undergraduate degree and MFA in painting from the National University in Seoul. She is represented by Kukje Gallery in Seoul, Locks Gallery in Philadelphia, and Ota Fine Arts in Tokyo. This spring she was in the group exhibition “Earth, Fire, and Soul – Masterpieces of Korean Ceramics” at the Grand Palais in Paris. You can see more works from her Translated Vase series on her website.

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2014, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 71 x 35 1/2 x 31 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVW5), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 24 x 20 x 18 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVWG1), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 61 1/2 x 36 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVW8), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 52 x 28 1/2 x 27 1/2 inches, Collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVG4), 2012, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 42 x 29 x 29 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013 (detail), ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

Translated Vase (TVW 6), 2013, ceramic shards, epoxy, 24k gold leaf, 27 x 26 x 27 1/2 inches

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Ultra Satisfying Porcelain Carving Videos by Abe Haruya 

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain#carving #うつわ #器 #しのぎ#飯碗#帳尻合わせ #阿部春弥 ・・

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

・ #ceramics #pottery #porcelain #うつわ#器#面取#阿部春弥 #帳尻合わせ

A video posted by Haruya Abe 阿部春弥 (@abe_haruya) on

Japanese ceramic artist Haruya Abe shares short clips of a ceramic carving technique where top layers of porcelain are gently scraped away using a scalpel-like instrument. Not only does it create beautiful results, the process is just satisfying to watch. Given the same tools, I’d scrape these pieces into oblivion. You can see more photos and videos of Haruya’s studio work here. (via @StreetArtGlobe)

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A 150-Year-Old Porcelain Warehouse in Japan Opens for Daily ‘Treasure Hunts’ for Just $45 

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The Kouraku Kiln was founded in Arita (Saga Prefecture, Japan) in 1865 and has been producing ceramics for the past 150 years. Over that time the facility has accumulated a vast collection of pottery that has, for one reason or another, gone unsold. The warehouse is so vast that some workers use a bicycle to get from one side to the other. And they’ll be the first to admit that even they don’t really know what’s in there. The production facility is now inviting visitors on a “treasure hunt” to try and get rid of some of their stock.

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Here’s how the treasure hunt works:

— Make your reservation by phone (they only allow 10 people per day)
— Show up at your designated time and select your course and pay: 5,000 yen or 10,000 yen (about $45 to $90)
— Get a 30-min tour of the facility
— Begin your 90-min treasure hunt. You’ll be given a pair of gloves, a flashlight and a basket. You can take home everything you fit in your basket.
— The more expensive course gives you access to a special section of decoratively painted ceramics but both allow you to take home as much as you can fit in your basket. Once done you’ll get to wrap everything up in newspaper so that nothing breaks on your way home.

It sounds like a really fun excursion! They even have an English-speaking staff on hand to assist foreigners.

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(Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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