Tag Archives: portraits

Comical Portraits of Hairless Dogs by Sophie Gamand

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Prophecy is the latest dog portraiture project from New York-based photographer Sophie Gamand (previously) that examines the extremely strange and comical appearance of various hairless dogs. Gamand worked mostly with two types of dogs, the Chinese Crested and the Xoloitzcuintli (commonly the Mexican hairless dog), breeds that archaeologists have dated as being more than 3,000 years old. From her statement about Prophecy:

The physical qualities of hairless dogs and the mystery surrounding them inspired me to create a gallery of faces like old wise men or philosophers, shamans from a different era, maybe a different universe. Gamand imagined her models as prophets or mad scientists, grabbing us and planting their eyes deep into ours, shaking us and shouting, as Philippus the Prophet in The Adventures of Tintin would: “The judgment is upon you! The end is near!” Nature looking straight at us and begging us to repent.

The series includes some 20 individual portraits, many more of which you can see on her website.

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Photographer Spends 20 Years Documenting How We All Dress Exactly Alike

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For the last 20 years, unassuming Dutch photographer Hans Eijkelboom has traversed the world, picking a spot, be it in Shanghai, New York, or Paris, and meticulously photographed what he saw. “I take between 1 and 80 photographs a day, almost every day, 12 months a year,” he says, referring to his “Photo Notes” project, which has now been turned into a book titled People of the Twenty-First Century. The “Photographic Journal,” published by PHAIDON, is the largest, most comprehensive work of his to date, and includes thousands of photos that, together, create a fascinating picture of mankind.

The “anti-sartorial” photographs of everyday people capture specific visual themes – people in red jackets, men with bare chests on roller blades – that are grouped together with the date, city and time range they were taken. And this combination and repetition is what makes the photographs so powerful. Viewed separately, they would hardly even catch our eye.

“I don’t use this diary to show what happens in my life but as a method of visualizing the development of my world view,” writes the artist. Much like the way stalagmites form in caves over hundreds of years, Eijkelboom’s landscape is the result of a methodical fixation to the banality of everyday life. Hans Eijkelboom’s “People of the Twenty-First Century” is available for around $26 (Via Citylab)

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Thread Paintings: Densely Embroidered Portraits by Cayce Zavaglia

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When scouring through the minute details of artist Cayce Zavaglia’s embroidered portraits (previously), it’s difficult imagine each work is scarcely larger than 8″ x 10″. Her process, which she refers to as both “thread painting” and “renegade embroidery,” begins with a photoshoot of each subject, namely friends, family, and fellow artists. Roughly 100-150 photos are winnowed down to a single selection which she then begins to embroider with one-ply embroidery thread on Belgian linen. She shares via her artist statement:

Over the years, I have developed a sewing technique that allows me to blend colors and establish tonalities that resemble the techniques used in classical oil painting. The direction in which the threads are sewn mimic the way brush marks are layered within a painting which, in turn, allows for the allusion of depth, volume, and form. My stitching methodology borders on the obsessive, but ultimately allows me to visually evoke painterly renditions of flesh, hair, and cloth.

Zavaglia is also interested with the backs of her portraits, a tangled mesh of thread and knots resembling a more abstract version of the exacting portrait on the reverse. In a return to her roots as a painter, she creates gouache and large format acrylic paintings of the backsides, effectively creating a painting of an emboirdery of a photograph. Included here are several works from the last two years including works that will be on view at Art Miami this December through Lyons Wier Gallery. (via Booooooom)

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Majestic Black and White Studio Portraits of Goats and Sheep by Kevin Horan

Ben #1, 2014
Ben #1, 2014. Photo © Kevin Horan.

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Sherlock #2, 2012. Ella #1, 2014. Photos © Kevin Horan.

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Carl #1. Photos © Kevin Horan.

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Xantippe #1. Lizzie #1. Photo © Kevin Horan.

Jake #1, 2012
Jake #1, 2012. Photo © Kevin Horan.

horan-4Sydney #3. Xenia #1. Photos © Kevin Horan.

Mr. Beasley #1, 2014
Mr. Beasley #1, 2014. Photo © Kevin Horan.

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Briede #1. Honey #3. Photos © Kevin Horan.

Honey #1, 2014
Honey #1, 2014. Photo © Kevin Horan.

When it comes to fancy studio portraits of pets, it’s no surprise people are willing to hire photographers for loving photos of their cats and dogs, we’ve even seen cameras thoughtfully trained on chickens and exotic snakes, but commercial photographer Kevin Horan decided it was high time for an artistically neglected group of barnyard animals to step into the spotlight: goats and sheep. In 2007, Horan moved from Chicago to Whidbey Island, Washington where he approached a neighbor about photographing one of his sheep. The neighbor agreed and his portrait series Chattel was born.

Lately, Horan photographs mostly sheep and goats from the New Moon Farm Goat Rescue in Arlington, WA, where he sets up a portable studio and works with assitants to achieve surprisingly emotive and humorous portraits that reveal the subtle personality of each animal. The wildly popular series was selected in Photolucida’s Critical Mass Top 50 for 2014, and one of the photos was acquired by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art. Prints are available upon request. (via Slate, PetaPixel)

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Portraits Painted on Film Negatives by Nick Gentry

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British artist Nick Gentry (previously) created a new series of portraits by painting on cut film negatives, part of an ongoing effort to repurpose obsolete media—he’s widely known for his paintings on floppy disks—which he uses as a backdrop for his portraiture. The new pieces are part of an upcoming show titled Synthetic Dreams at Robert Fontaine Gallery in Miami in November. You can see some of Gentry’s most recent work in his online gallery.

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Portraits of Birds Ruffling with Personality by Leila Jeffreys

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Pepper. Southern Boobook.

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Trinity. Brown Goshawk.

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Bob. Long-Billed Corella.

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Jarra. Cockatiel.

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Yule. Barking Owl.

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Neville. Major Mitchell’s Cockatoo.

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Seisa. Palm Cockatoo.

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Penguin. Magpie. (She’s not dead, just goofing off!)

To say photographer Leila Jeffreys had an eclectic upbringing would be a bit of an understatement. With a mother from India and a father from the Isle of Man, she has lived in Papua New Guinea, a house boat in Kashmir despite an ongoing war, and in an Indian village surrounded by buffaloes, mongoose, and monkeys.

As a child, Jeffreys was taught by her father to rescue and nurse birds back to health, an experience that resulted in a deep understanding of wildlife that is immediately apparent when viewing her spectacular portraits of birds. Her affectionate photographs of owls, eagles, cockatiels and budgies seem to capture the essence of each animal’s personality, portraying many of them with surprisingly human characteristics.

Jeffreys now lives in Sydney and recently completed work on her latest series of predatory birds titled Prey. She just opened an exhibition at Olsen Irwin Gallery that runs through September 28, and you can also see a collection of her cockatiel photos later this year at Purdy Hicks Gallery in London. Do yourself a favor and follow her on Instagram.

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Recent Stencil Graffiti from C215

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No matter how many times I stop to consider artworks by Parisian street artist C215 (previously) I’m left wondering just how he pulls it off. The texture, the color, the detail, all executed with stencils and spray paint on any available surface. C215 says that he frequently portrays “things and people that society aims at keeping hidden: homeless people, smokers, street kids, bench lovers for example,” though one of his favorite muses is his daughter Nina who has appeared in numerous portraits over the years. He also sneaks in references to pop culture, most notably one of the best tributes to Robin Williams I’ve seen yet.

Collected here are a number of pieces from the last year or so, you can see more on Flickr and Facebook. A retrospective of his work opens at Opera Gallery in Paris in October.

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