portraits

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Richly Textured Portraits of Native Arctic Residents and European Explorers by Preta Wolzak

May 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In her series Ma Petite Inuite and Everybody Needs A Hero, artist Preta Wolzak explores the parallel histories of people on the earth’s poles. Her colorful portraits are constructed of leather, embroidery thread, wool, and glow-in-the-dark twine, combined to depict faces of both the first people of the North and 19th century explorers of the South, including Robert Falcon Scott and Ernest Shackleton.

Wolzak shares with Colossal that she uses her artistic practice to draw attention to the impact that tourism, manifest destiny, and climate change has had particularly on both the North and South Poles. Our exploratory interest in these seemingly far-off places has direct impacts on the people who live close to the Arctic and Antarctic.

Wolzak is represented by Rademakers Gallery in Amsterdam, where her solo show opens on May 24 and is on view until June 17, 2018. You can see more of her work on Instagram.

 

 



Mesmerizing New Collages by Lola Dupré Distort the Human Form into Gravity-Defying Shapes

May 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

Collage artist Lola Dupré (previously) continues to create mind-boggling manipulations of photographs in her surreal style. The Scotland-based artist cuts images into thousands of shards and arranges them to create her intricate collages. In rearranging the photo fragments, Dupré adds unusual elongations of faces and limbs, multiplies eyes and mouths, and bends bodies in defiance of gravity and anatomy. Her work is often commissioned for magazine editorials—included here are several examples of recent projects. You can see more of the artist’s surreal creations on her website (where originals are for sale), as well as on tumblr and Behance. She also shares her process on Instagram.

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

For Satellite Journal / Photography and styling: Tre and Elmaz / Model: Genevieve Welsh

Diptera / Photography: Denef Huvaj

For Le Mile Magazine / Photography: Alexandre Felix / Model: Nala Luuna Diagouraga

For Agapornis Magazine / Photography: César Segarra / Styling: Laura Mata / Model: Salva Lopez

Reinvention of the Soul II – Anticlone Embodied for Glassbook / Creative Director and Model: Sade English / Photographer: Warren King

For Eye Republic Magazine / Photography: Lisa Carletta / Model: Bee

Charlie I

Emmanuel Macron

 

 



An Examination of the Color Black in Gorgeous Portraits by Yannis Davy Guibinga

May 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour," photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Images from the series “The Darkest Colour,” photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

Self-taught Gabonese photographer Yannis Davy Guibinga is known for portraits that highlight the diversity of cultures and identities in the African diaspora. His works are often richly hued, with subjects positioned against bright gradient backgrounds or adorned in warm tones.

In his project The Darkest Colour however, Guibinga moves away from his multi-colored photo shoots to focus entirely on the color black and its relationship to darkness, mourning, and death. The series is set in front of a matte black background and features two nude models whose skin has also been painted black. The works seek to unpack the negative aspects of the both the color and its symbolism.

“Black is generally the colour associated with tragedy, death, and mourning, and the act of passing away is considered to be a tragedy in many cultures,” Guibinga tells Colossal. “‘The Darkest Colour’ seeks to redefine association of black and death with tragedy and sadness by representing the act of passing away as more of a relaxing experience.”

The 22-year-old photographer is currently a student in professional photography at Marsan College in Montreal. You can see more of his portraits, like his series 2050 which explores the future of fashion from a black woman’s perspective, on his website and Instagram. (via WideWalls)

Images from the series "The Darkest Colour, "photographed by Yannis Davy Guibinga, featuring Tania Fines and Madjou Diallo, and with bodypainting by Jean Guy Leclerc. All images via Yannis Davy Guibinga.

 

 



Joyful Embroidered Photographs Embellished with Colorful Floral Motifs by Aline Brant

May 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Aline Brant celebrates people of varying ages and genders in her lovely embroidered photographs. Brant starts with a black and white photograph featuring an individual person, who is then embellished with swirling strands of flowers, leaves, and vine-like lines. The brightly colored embroidery stands in contrast to the subdued grayscale tones of the photographs, highlighting the human figure while also standing alone as an eye-catching visual motif. Brant shares her work, interspersed with personal musings, on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

 

 



Afro Beauty Brought to Life in Photographer Luke Nugent’s Lavish Hair Portraiture

April 25, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British photographer Luke Nugent captures a wide range of style, beauty, and personal expression in his creative photo shoots, for which he often works with London-based hair stylist Lisa Farrall. Nugent highlights women of color in his varied series, from the more subdued everyday styles in Emancipate to the Afrofuturism-inspired Armour, which was a finalist for the 2016 British Hair Awards.

Nugent studied photography at London’s University of Greenwich, and has been shooting professionally since his late teens. He creates work for a variety of commercial and editorial campaigns, with a focus on fashion, portraiture, and music. You can see more of his photography on his website, as well as Instagram and Behance. (via Scene360)

 

 

 



Tin Cans Transformed into Famous Art Historical Self-Portraits by Allan Rubin

April 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Allan Rubin, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera (2017), all images via the artist.

Allan Rubin, Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera (2017), all images via the artist.

Allan Rubin‘s aptly named series CANON presents a range of famous artists throughout history, all rendered from an amalgamation of tin cans. The works are each painted in the style of the artist’s self-portrait, such as a Post-Impressionist Vincent Van Gogh or Neoclassical Angelica Kauffmann.

The body of work grew out of the painter’s desire to work on a smaller scale in his cramped studio. The can sculptures proved to be a perfect solution, and provided an intriguing challenge for Rubin to transform flat images into three-dimensional works.

Throughout the years he has learned the best formula to build his portraits, like realizing that the shape of tomato sauce cans are well suited for heads. “Cookie tins sometimes make good torsos,” he told Hyperallergic. “Bean cans are just right for arms and necks. Sardine cans make great hands. Lids have rings embossed on them that work perfectly for ears, and also become noses that I have learned to bend, slot, and tab onto the faces.”

Rubin’s solo exhibition CANON continues through May 5 at the Delaware Valley Arts Alliance in Narrowsburg, New York. You can see more of Rubin’s uncanny renderings on Facebook. (via Hyperallergic)

Mary Cassatt (2017)

Mary Cassatt (2017)

Claude Monet (2018)

Claude Monet (2018)

Judith Leyster (2017)

Judith Leyster (2017)

Uemura Shōen (2017)

Uemura Shōen (2017)

Vincent Van Gogh (2016)

Vincent Van Gogh (2016)

Angelica Kauffmann (2017)

Angelica Kauffmann (2017)

Suzanne Valadon (2017)

Suzanne Valadon (2017)

Niki De Saint Phalle (2017)

Niki De Saint Phalle (2017)

Edgar Degas (2017)

Edgar Degas (2017)

Leonor Fini (2018)

Leonor Fini (2018)

 

 

 



Expressive Color-Filled Portraits of Friends and Family by Hope Gangloff

April 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Lorem Ipsum, 2017, acrylic on wood panel, 75 x 48 in.

Artist Hope Gangloff captures the personalities of her friends and family in brightly colored large-scale portraits. Gangloff’s acrylic and collage paintings show her subjects in intimate settings—often domestic interiors—in poses of relaxation or quiet focus. The artist’s strong but gestural lines create defined shapes that are filled with repetitive marks and bright patterns. Gangloff gives equal textural attention to all areas of the painting, which draws the viewer’s eye to every detail and also contextualizes each portrait sitter in a unique set of surroundings. (If you’re intrigued by this flat field patterning, also take a look at Édouard Vuillard‘s paintings).

The New York-based artist’s large body of work consists of a substantial number of these vibrant portraits. In an interview with Vogue, Gangloff describes her choice of subject as akin to rock climbing:

An outsider who doesn’t look at a lot of art might not understand why I paint similar things over and over again… But there are always micro movements. I’m always working through problems. Rock climbers look for little changes in rocks to help them climb and keep going. When I look at a painting, I’m also looking for the move that’s going to set off something else. The whole painting is like a problem I’m trying to solve.

Gangloff studied at Cooper Union and is represented by Susan Inglett Gallery in New York. In 2017 she was the inaugural artist selected for Stanford University’s Diekman Contemporary Commissions Program, which included a solo show and a weeklong artist residency during which Gangloff painted publicly in the Cantor Arts Center atrium. You can see more of the artist’s portraits, as well as her still life paintings, ink drawings, and political posters on her website and Instagram.

Kristen Schiele, 2015, Acrylic on panel, 36 x 24 in.

Bodner/Caivano Chess Match, 2016, acrylic on canvas. 72 x 96 in.

Late Night (Olga Alexandrovskaya), 2015, acrylic and collage on canvas, 82 x 54 in.

Couch Surfer, 2015, acrylic on canvas. 96 x 72 in.

Queen Jane, Approximately, 2011, Acrylic on canvas. 66 x 108 in.

Moolog, Dad and Kieve, 2015, acrylic and collage on canvas, 72 x 48 in.

E. Starbuck, 2010, acrylic on canvas. 63 x 111 in.

Future Bitches, 2017, acrylic on canvas, 72 x 48 in.

Vera, 2013, acrylic on canvas, 81 x 54 in.