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Art

Hyperrealistic Oil Paintings of Vivid Chrome Masks by Kip Omolade

January 9, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash I, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Brooklyn-based artist Kip Omolade creates large-scale oil paintings of chrome masks, depicting not only the subtle details of female faces, but incorporating the reflected environment of each piece. The series, entitled Diovadiova Chrome, makes reference in part to historical African sculptures, while exploring contemporary aspects of identity, luxury, and immortality. Each piece begins as a mold and cast taken from an actual model which is then utilized as source material for Omolade’s towering paintings which can measure several feet tall.

Diovadiova Chrome portraits historically connect to ancient, realistic African sculptures such as Benin ivory masks and Ife bronze heads,” shares Omolade in his artist statement. “The oil paintings are psychological studies that investigate immortality, the universal masks we all wear and contemporary notions of beauty and luxury. The labor-intensive process involves making a mold and cast of each model’s face, reworking the cast plaster sculpture, producing a version in resin and adding a chrome layer with artificial eyelashes. The final sculpture then serves as a model for the hyper-realistic oil painting. This technique maintains the likeness qualities of portraiture while re-presenting a mask that serves as a conduit between the spiritual and natural world.”

The term Omolade uses to describe the series, Diovadiova, is a word he derived from a combination of the Italian word “Dio” meaning god, and the historical meaning of the word “diva” which is goddess.

Omolade first began his art career working as a graffiti artist while interning at Marvel Comics and The Center for African Art and went on to earn a BFA from the School of Visual Arts. His work was most recently included in the Re:Semblance exhibition at the Redbull House of Art in Detroit and last year’s FREAK OUT! show at Zhou B Art Center. You can follow more of his work on Instagram. (via Creator’s Project)

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn IV, Oil on canvas, 24 x 36 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn I, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash IV, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Kitty Cash II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn V, Oil on canvas, 12 x 16 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Karyn III, Oil on canvas, 36 x 48 in.

Diovadiova Chrome Joyce II, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 in.

 

 



Art

Enormous Palette Knife Portraits and Figures by Salman Khoshroo

December 30, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Working with a large palette knife and thick globs of oil paint, Tehran-based artist Salman Khoshroo creates large-scale figures and portraits that practically drip from the canvas. The scale on a computer or mobile screen can be quite deceiving, as most of these pieces are several feet tall, composed of enormously precise strokes that veer toward abstraction while eventually leading to a cohesive figure. Most of the paintings seen here were created for a 2015 show at Azad Gallery and an exhibition earlier this year at Shirin Gallery. You can follow Khoshroo’s work on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Art Illustration

Prismatic Sketches of Hands and Faces by Lui Ferreyra

December 22, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Artist Lui Ferreyra draws colorful portraits of hands and faces, works that use discrete shapes of color as highlights and shadows. These geometric fragments are blended by the viewer’s eye rather than the artist’s hand, producing color fields that Ferreyra intends to call attention to the connection between seeing and language.

“There’s a double move at play here,” explains Ferreyra’s website about his work. “The first move is substantiated by a geometric matrix which functions as surface: it embraces and emphasizes the aspect of flatness within a complex network of geometric shapes, each unique unto itself. The second move is fulfilled by the cumulative effect of all the shapes functioning together as a color-field in which each shape contextualizes every other shape, thereby providing all the necessary visual cueing to manifest a kind of window one can look through. Surface and window, at and through, like language which points both at the world and back at itself.”

You can see more of Ferreyra’s colorful drawings, in addition to oil paintings, on InstagramFacebook, or William Havu Gallery where he is represented. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Art Craft

Intimate Embroidered Portraits by Danielle Clough

November 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Cape Town-based artist Danielle Clough (previously here and here) embroiders portraits of friends and loved ones, adapting black and white images of subjects into multi-colored works. By working from black and white images the resulting works are not tied to the colors present in the original images, creating vibrant pieces that feature bright oranges, purples, and blues.

The portraits featured here were produced by Clough for the upcoming book Queer Africa II, a collection of new stories about love on the continent of Africa. The editors, Makhosazana Xaba and Karen Martin, were drawn to Clough’s work for the publication because of the conceptual linkage of her layered yarn to the personal narratives told in the book, which Zaba explained “adds meaning and speaks to the zigzagging nature of our lives.”

Queer Africa II will be published next month through MaThoko’s Books and be available online through both Amazon and African Books Collective. You can see more portraits by Clough on her Instagram, and take a look into the artist’s process on her blog.

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Photography

Aerial Shots of the Bright and Colorful Goods Sold by Street Vendors in Vietnam by Photographer Loes Heerink

October 26, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Fascinated by the colorful arrangements of flowers and fruits strapped to the bikes of street vendors in Vietnam, photographer Loes Heerink began climbing onto different bridges around Hanoi to capture these pops of color on the streets. Heerink loved that each of the vendors creates a new piece of art everyday, and that the collection of goods they bring into town differs each morning. This act prompted the series “Vendors from Above,” a collection of these street vendor photographs she shot while living in Vietnam.

In order to commemorate these workers, who are often female migrants, Heerink is hoping to expand the project to create a photobook through her new Kickstarter campaign which will bring her back to Vietnam. You can see more series from the now Netherlands-based photographer on her website and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

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Craft Illustration

Quilled Paper Portraits That Highlight the Beauty of Old Age by Yulia Brodskaya

September 6, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Jade” (2016), all images via Yulia Brodskaya

Utilizing vibrantly colored paper, artist and illustrator Yulia Brodskaya (previously here and here), creates unique three-dimensional portraits that reflect the beauty found in old age. Each work contains a palette of colors that remain at the center of her focus, recently concentrating on precious jewel tones that also serve as the title for each portrait. Previously Brodskaya had referred to these quilled pieces as drawings, but the more expressionistic her style becomes, the more her work reflects a painterly approach.

“I used to say that I was drawing with paper, but I believe with this technique I’ve found a way to paint with paper,” said Brodskaya to Colossal. “I mix strips of paper as I would mix paints on a palette. These artworks are all about color and the unique, tactile feel that paper strips add to it. The portraits resemble oil and acrylic painting (especially from a distance), but with a textured paper twist.”

You can find more images of Brodskaya’s quilled paper paintings on her blog and Facebook, and see a step-by-step demonstration of her process in the video below.

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“Jade” (2016)

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“Topaz” (2016)

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“Topaz” (2016)

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“Amethyst” (2016)

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“Amethyst” (2016)

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“Amethyst” (2016)

 

 



Art Photography

Photographic Images That Weave Moments in Time by Jason Chen

April 25, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Detail of “K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75, all images via Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia

Moving beyond traditionally static methods of portraiture, Jason Chen creates movement through the weaving of multiple images into one. Chen’s works use separate images of the same subject to explore mutation and time, offering a more fluid peek into his subject’s emotional state. When glanced at from afar the images appear quite singular, but when zoomed in the disparate details of the images stand out—multiple eyes occupying the same face like seen in Chen’s haunting G-iii.

This is a relatively new method for the Philadelphia-based photographer who had been previously focused on dry plate tintypes. Chen is the co-founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio where he is currently included in the group exhibition “Portrait”  through June 18th. (via Hi Fructose)

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“K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“Ian” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36”w

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“Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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Detail of “Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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“C,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 9in x 11in

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“G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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Detail of “G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“G-ii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 20.5in x 20.5in