Prague

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Art Design

A Contemporary Art Center in Prague Builds 138-Foot Rooftop Airship as a Home for Public Events

September 22, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek) All images licensed for use on Colossal.

An enormous object resembling a zeppelin has just been built atop the Dox Center for Contemporary Art in Prague. The 138-foot structure (42-meter) won’t be taking to the sky anytime soon, but will instead be utilized as a public gathering space for readings, performances, and debates about literature. The wooden airship-like building is situated atop a cascade of steps on the Dox center’s roof and should accommodate up to 120 seated visitors.

The alternative meeting space was designed as part of a collaboration between the center’s founder and director, Leos Valka, and architect Martin Rajnis who won the 2014 Global Award for Sustainable Architecture. “Our aim for the world of contemporary art is to spread and get partially interconnected with the world of literature,” Valka shared with the AP at a preview event this week. “It’s a world of pure imagination, a children’s world.” Rajnis recently gave a Creative Mornings talk in Prague titled Embrace the Weird.

The airship has officially been named Gulliver, after the fictional protagonist and narrator of Jonathan Swift’s famous Gulliver’s Travels. You can see more process photos on Pinterest, Google Photos, and on Facebook.

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

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(AP Photo/Petr David Josek)

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Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

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Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

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Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

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Photo courtesy HAMR Huť architektury Martin Rajniš.

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Photo by Matej Slávik / HN

 

 



Art

A Rotating 42-Layer Sculpture of Franz Kafka’s Head by David Cerny

May 18, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Located in a busy shopping center in Prague, this twisting and reflective sculpture depicting the head of writer Franz Kafka is the latest kinetic artwork by controversial Czech artist David Cerny. Installed in 2014, the enormous mirrored bust is comprised of 42 independently driven layers of stainless steel and weighs in at some 45 tons. The piece brilliantly reveals Kafka’s tortured personality and unrelenting self doubt that plagued him his entire life. The layering of objects is a common motif for Cerny who built a similar rotating head that also functions as a fountain titled Metalmorphosis. (thnx, Chelsea & Diana!)

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

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David Černý, kinetic Head of Franz Kafka, Prague. Photo by Jindřich Nosek via Wikimedia Commons.

 

 



Art

Dozens of Cement People Dangling from Umbrellas in a Prague Office Building

December 20, 2012

Christopher Jobson

These cement figures dangling from umbrellas within a narrow space inside the EBC office center in Prague are part of a installation titled Slight Uncertainty by Czech artist Michal Trpák. Check out much more of his sculptural work on his website.

 

 



Art

A Czech Merry-Go-Round

December 6, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Though I lived not too far from here in Prague a few years ago, we never quite got around to enjoying the thrill of suspending ourselves from a rotating billboard, though I admit it looks pretty damn fun. Maybe next time. This particular stunt was the handy work of Vojtěch Fröhlich, Ondřej Mladý, January Šimánek, and Vladimír Turner, and if you liked this you’ll also like the Double Happiness Billboard Swingset. (via rebel:art)

 

 



Animation History

Pražský Orloj turns 600

October 15, 2010

Christopher Jobson

The Prague astronomical clock turned 600 this week, and why not celebrate one of the world’s most complex clocks with a craaaazy projected animation. I walked past this clock almost every day in 2004, wish I could have seen this first-hand. Projection work by Macula. (via kottke)

 

 

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