Tag Archives: process

New Text Drawings Formed by Letters From Religious Texts by Meg Hitchcock 

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It’s been awhile since we’ve written about Meg Hitchcock‘s work (previously), first covering her practice in 2011 when she spent 135 hours gluing tens of thousands of individuals letters from the Koran to transcribe the Book of Revelation from the Christian New Testament. Hitchcock continues to produce religious-based text works that dissect the word of God, discouraging her audience from a literal reading by ignoring punctuation and spacing in the sentences she forms. Recently her text drawings have become a bit more figural, forming feet, scarves, and niqabs on paper with thousands of sourced letters.

“The labor-intensive aspect of my work is a meditation practice as well as an exploration of the various forms of devotion,” said Hitchcock in an artist statement. “A long history in evangelical Christianity formed my core beliefs about God and transcendence, but I later relinquished the Christian path. I now gravitate toward Eastern Mysticism, and am deeply moved by Islam. My work is a celebration of the diverse experiences of spirituality and the universal need for connection with something greater than oneself. In the end, the holy word of God may be nothing more than a sublime expression of our shared humanity.”

Hitchcock’s work is currently presented in the group exhibition “This is Not a Book” at the San Jose Institute for Contemporary Art through September 11, 2016. (via Booooooom)

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Take a Peek Inside the Studio of Insectophile Sculptor Edouard Martinet 

Fascinated by the biological forms of insects, fish, and arthropods, artist Edouard Martinet assembles gargantuan depictions of the creatures with found automotive and bicycle parts. While we’ve shared many of his sculptures here on Colossal (previously here and here), this behind-the-scenes visit of his workshop sheds a fantastic light on the scale and detail of his creations. Martinet’s ability to build something so organic from mechanical components is nothing short of astounding. Directed by Will Farrell. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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A Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star by Frank Howarth 

In this new timelapse video, woodworker Frank Howarth (previously) demonstrates how he designed and constructed a replica of the Star Wars’ Death Star out of bamboo. The Portland-based designer, who also has a degree in architecture from Harvard, shares much of his behind-the-scenes processes through his wildly popular YouTube channel. I expected to skip through different parts of the video, but Howarth has an uncanny ability to film himself working, it really is worth watching the whole thing straight through. Even the sound design is great.

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A Fascinating Step-by-Step Animation Showing the Technique of Making a Bronze Cast 

Created for the Hadrian Exhibition at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem last December, this short animation details the elaborate process of creating a bronze cast using the lost-wax technique. The mix of stop motion and 2D animation is perfect for showing the materials used in each step along with helpful cross sections of what happens inside the mold. It’s so interesting to realize that the image depicted is transferred five times through different mediums —the original sculpture, plaster mold, wax, plaster again, bronze—before arriving at the final bronze artwork. Directed and animated by Renana Aldor and Kobi Vogman. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Art at Altitude: Watch Artist Simon Beck Trample Calculated Murals onto Snowy Mountaintops 

We just featured new snow drawings by artist Simon Beck earlier this month, but this new short film by Great Big Story takes us behind the scenes as he tramples a number of new pieces at Powder Mountain Resort in Utah. Beck mentions that he often walks an estimated 5,000 steps an hour for up to 10 hours at a time to complete an average piece, but some works can span several days of labor. See photos of his latest pieces here. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Each Line One Breath: Morphogenetic Freehand Drawings By John Franzen 

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In his series of drawings titled Each Line One Breath, Netherlands-based artist John Franzen creates textured drawings reminiscent of wrinkled fabric or waves of water by drawing tediously placed rows of lines with black ink. The artist begins by drawing a single vertical line on the far side of a canvas but on subsequent lines allows for various imperfections to become amplified or suppressed as he continues, line after line. The process, which might look maddening, actually appears to be a sort of meditative effort for Franzen who works with almost robotic precision. Watch the two videos above to see how he works. If you liked this you might also enjoy the work of Tony Orrico. (via Booooooom, Saatchi Online)

Update: Franzen will be in Berlin next Tuesday as part of a new exhibition at Platoon Kunsthalle.

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