Tag Archives: public art

Billboards That Advertise the Surrounding California Landscape by Jennifer Bolande 

All photos by Lance Gerber / courtesy of the artist and Desert X

Jennifer Bolande‘s work Visible Distance / Second Sight, is not one that you stop your car at and observe, in fact, its not one that even requires slowing to admire. The several billboard installation stretches alongside the Gene Autry Trail and Vista Chino in California, bordering the roads with scenic images of the same mountains that peak out behind each piece. In some instances the images match perfectly with the surrounding range, creating an alignment of fabricated reality while one zooms past the display.

Similar to artist Brian Kane‘s billboard displays of forests and galaxies in Massachusetts in the summer of 2015, Bolande’s work calls attention to nature in a ceaseless vacuum of pushy advertising. By placing images of the environment beside the roadway Bolande hopes to point passersby back to the landscape itself.

The piece is part of the exhibition Desert X which also features Doug Aitken’s mirror-covered house. The exhibition runs through April 30, 2017, and you can see a full schedule of tours and events on their website. (via Designboom)

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Artist Benedetto Bufalino Unveils a Disco Ball Cement Truck 

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Thanks to French artist Benedetto Bufalino, you can now dance the night away at a construction site turned night club with the help of his new Diso Ball Cement Mixer. The truck was parked from December 8-10 in Lyon, France where bright spotlights pointed at the truck turned the streets and building facades into swirling dance party. The spectacle apparently grabbed the attention of quite a few passersby who stopped to take photos and film the otherwise mundane work site that was transformed for a few hours each night.

Bufalino is known for his unconventional approach to urban interventions, frequently installing active aquariums into phone booths and creating a variety of public art pieces in unexpected places. (via Designboom)

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Elaborate Bronze Memorial Dedicated to Staten Island Ferry Octopus Attack Tricks Tourists 

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Monuments and vaguely descriptive plaques are commonplace around cities and heavily trafficked tourist areas, giving just enough insight into an historic event or landmark. The Staten Island Ferry Disaster Memorial blends in with these weathered monuments, except for the fact that all details on the work are completely false. The monument, which is located in Battery Park, Manhattan, was created by artist Joe Reginella and honors the 400 victims who perished during a giant octopus attack of a Staten Island ferry named the Cornelius G. Kolff on November 22, 1963, the same day as the assassination of JFK.

The elaborate hoax was six months in the making, and is also seen by Reginella as a multimedia art project and social experiment. The website, and fliers distributed around Manhattan by his team, give a false location for a museum, ironically a place you must get to by ferry. You can see more tourist reactions and find real information about the fake event on the Staten Island Ferry Octopus Disaster Memorial Museum’s Facebook. (via Hi-Fructose)

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A Shimmering Mylar Wave Undulates Above Downtown LA 

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Spanning 15,000 square feet, the installation Liquid Shard subtly sways above downtown Los Angeles’s Pershing Square, a glittering band of what appears to be silver streamers. The piece, by Patrick Shearn of Poetic Kinetics, is actually composed of holographic mylar and monofilament, the materials which give the work its reflective quality.  As the two layers of the piece undulate with the wind they range from 15 to 115 feet off of the ground, creating a natural movement some have compared to swaying sea flora.

Shearn was inspired by humans’ collective observation of nature and the limited knowledge of what we see around us, which is why he intended the piece to be viewed from above as well as below. It is when things are zoomed in or slowed down that we begin to understand the workings of the plants and animals around us, and sense the movements that are imperceptible with our limited vision.

“Like fractals recurring progressively, we feel the currents of air on our skin but do not see the larger movements,” said Shearn. “I wanted to play in that realm with this technology I have been developing.”

The piece is part of an ongoing outdoor exhibition series curated NOW Art LA who worked on this particular project in collaboration with The City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and ParksNOW Art LA, the AAV School, and Pershing Square. Liquid Shard will be remain on view until August 11, 2016.

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A Giant Glass Raindrop Balances on a Bronze Man’s Face in Ukraine 

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All images via Nazar Bilyk

Ukrainian artist Nazar Bilyk created the 6-foot tall sculpture “Rain” as a symbol of man’s communication with nature, a dialogue between the human race and the world around us. The bronze sculpture features a nondescript man looking upward, a giant glass raindrop positioned over his face. This orb of translucent glass seems to balance perfectly, a sort of calm communing happening between the droplet and the solitary figure.

“The raindrop is a symbol of the dialogue which connects a man with a whole diversity of life forms,” Bilyk told My Modern Met. “The figure has a loose and porous structure and relates to dry land, which absorbs water. In this work I play with scale, making a raindrop large enough to compare a man with an insect, considering that man is a part of nature. Moreover, this work concerns the question of interaction and difficulties in coexistence of man with environment.”

You can see more of Bilyk’s work on his website and Behance. (via Bored Panda)

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Reinvigorating Wroclaw’s Riverside With Site-Specific Chair Installations 

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All images via No Studio

Collaborative duo No Studio, comprised of Polish artists Magda Szwajcowska and Michal Majewski, have placed several architectural interventions in their native city of Wrocław in an attempt to repopulate an area that has become forgotten about and neglected. The project fits site-specific chairs onto concrete stairs that lead to the city’s river, bright blue furniture that also acts as loveseat sunbeds for passersby. The pieces are installed as a part of the DOFA 2016 Lowersilesian Festival of Architecture, which is comprised of works around this year’s slogan of “Spaces for Beauty.”

You can view more of No Studio’s miniature architectural works on their website. (via Designboom)

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