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Art

Ephemeral Rugs Formed From Oklahoma’s Red Earth by Rena Detrixhe

March 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Oklahoma-based artist Rena Detrixhe creates installations from finely sifted dirt, ephemeral rugs that she stamps with ornate patterns. The dirt used for the works is collected by hand from her surrounding Oklahoma landscape, bringing an important context to the earth-based faux textiles.

“This rich red earth is the land of the dust bowl, the end of the Trail of Tears, land runs and pipelines, deep fault-lines and hydraulic fracturing,” said Detrixhe in her artist statement. “There is immense beauty and pride in this place and also profound sorrow. The refining and sifting of the soil and the imprinting of the pattern is a meditation on this past, a gesture of sensitivity, and the desire for understanding. It is a meticulous and solitary act.”

By using this fleeting form Detrixhe questions the permanent decisions that have been made to the region’s environment. One of her red dirt rugs is currently a part of the group exhibition Shifting Landscapes at Form & Concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico through May 20, 2017. You can view a time-lapse video of Detrixhe installing one of her rugs in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Hyperrealistic Paintings of Bulging, Decorative Rugs by Antonio Santin

February 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"corona" (2015), oil on canvas, 59x98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

“corona” (2015), oil on canvas, 59×98.5 inches, all images via Antonio Santin

Antonio Santin produces works that are nearly impossible to identify as paintings, hyperrealistic depictions of decorative rugs covered in complex floral arrangements and patterns. Each piece is composed of thousands of paint strokes that mimic the texture of a rug’s weave, thick segments of oil paint that transform his nearly five-foot long canvases.

Adding another layer of difficulty to the detailed paintings, Santin includes bulges and creases that appear to obscure large masses beneath his 2D surfaces. Previously working with still lifes, Santin told The Creators Project that the rugs were a way for him to get rid of the figure within his works while still holding on to the outline of its shape. He calls his rug series “figurative paintings without a figure,” eerie pieces that give an illusion of a body hidden beneath the surface.

The New York-based artist was born in Madrid, Spain in 1978, and graduated with a degree in Fine Arts from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid in 2005. You can see more of his rug paintings on his website and Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

“alicia” (2014), oil on canvas, 73×110 inches

"flushing meats" (2014), oil on canvas, 56x98 inches

“flushing meats” (2014), oil on canvas, 56×98 inches

"festland" (2014), oil on canvas, 52x97 inches

“festland” (2014), oil on canvas, 52×97 inches

"incest coin" (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

“incest coin” (2015), oil on canvas, 78 inches

"dystopian blues" (2014), oil on canvas, 78x90 inches

“dystopian blues” (2014), oil on canvas, 78×90 inches

"Claire" (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

“Claire” (2014), oil on canvas, 94 1/2 inches

"Claire" (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

“Claire” (detail) (2014), oil on canvas, 94.5 inches

 

 



Art

New Glitched-Out Rugs Designed from Traditional Textiles by Faig Ahmed

November 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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All images courtesy of Faig Ahmed Studio

Initially interested in the complexities of modern and ancient language, artist Faig Ahmed (previously) translated his fascination to the intricacies of carpet patterns, especially those from Turkey, Persia, India, and Caucasus. Distorting their original composition, Ahmed produces designs that break out of the traditional shape of luxury carpets, producing works that seem to split, drip, and separate on the wall.

His latest textile piece were created on a traditional loom, contemporary glitches and manipulations formed through age-old weaving techniques. Many of these recent works are also linked to Ahmed’s interests in genetic research and quantum physics, the mutated rugs serving as his attempt to display the impossibility of finding symmetry in nature and a chaotic world.

This past year Ahmed’s rugs were featured in shows at the Museum of Fine Art Boston, Bellevue Art Museum, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Cleveland, the Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design, and Museum of Old and New Art in Tasmania. His most recent exhibition, Source Code, opens November 17 at Sapar Contemporary in New York City and runs through January 5, 2017.

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Art

A Temporary Lawn Planted Amongst a Patchwork of Persian Rugs

October 19, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Tending to his work like a garden, New York-based Austrian artist Martin Roth grows grass within the fibers of Persian rugs, constantly watering his works to ensure the grass grows lush from within the dense fabric. The end result of this project, first exhibited at an Austrian castle in 2012, will always be the same. The rugs will unravel and the grass will die. This fatalistic act is both poetic and political for the artist, working with a sensual ephemerality as well as speaking to Western countries’ urges to bring their values to other countries.

Roth’s most recent rug installation is currently on view at the Korean Cultural Centre in London as a part of a show titled Riptide that features the work of Koo Jeong A and other artists. Over the next few weeks the piece will gradually change as the grass first mimics the patterns found on the rugs until it grows to create new forms. Towards the end of the exhibition the grass will nearly consume the rugs before dying itself, a cycle of birth, consumption, and eventual death.

You can witness the collaboration between rug and lawn from now until November 19, 2016. See more of Roth’s installation-based interventions on his website.

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Art Craft Design

New One-of-a-Kind Landscape Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou

September 9, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Argentinean artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) produces handmade wool rugs that appear like aerial snapshots of dreamy pastoral landscapes. Mimicking lush environments filled with trees and moss, her hand-tufted works can take up to several months to complete depending on size. One of her most recent pieces is a carpeted runway for designer Dries Van Noten made in collaboration with artist Danish artist Olafur Eliasson. Another piece, titled No Longer Creek and curated by Artsy, was included at this year’s Design Miami/ Basel from June 14-20.

You can take a look at more of Kehayoglou’s tufted wool landscapes on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website.

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Art

Elaborate Hand-Painted Persian Carpets by Jason Seife

August 12, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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In this new series of paintings, Miami-based artist Jason Seife deftly renders the intricate patterns of old Persian carpets with a mixture of acrylic and ink. While the paintings utilize familiar motifs in rug design like leaves and geometric shapes, Seife introduces colors not normally associated with the heavy textiles, creating his own interpretations that reflect his mood or thoughts while executing the painting. Via Robert Fontaine Gallery:

What initially drew him to these works was not only the aesthetic but the dense history and meaning behind the imagery. The way the weavers were able to link each rug’s particular pattern, palette, and style with a specific and identifiable geographic area or nomadic tribe really stood out to him. Jason aims to mirror this practice with his take on the carpets by having each color and pattern specifically correlate to what state of mind and emotion he was in while creating the specific work.

Seife has exhibited internationally and his work was recently incorporated into a special facade projection artwork with The Bronx and Brooklyn Museum. He’s currently represented by Robert Fontaine Gallery and you can see more of his new carpet paintings on Instagram.

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Craft Design Food

Handmade Floor Rugs in the Shape of Your Favorite Foods by SurfaceWerks

August 10, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Wisconsin-based artist and educator Carly Dellger started her Etsy shop SurfaceWerks in 2012, a store dedicated to her crochet rugs in the shape of avocados, cacti, and sunny-side up eggs. Each of Dellger’s rugs is an original design and created without a pattern to ensure that each piece is completely unique. You can pick from one of these handmade designs, or request a custom rug on SurfaceWerks’ site. More of her rugs—as well as doodles and puppy pics—can be seen on her Instagram. (via So Super Awesome)

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