Tag Archives: science fiction

An Alien Planet of Candy-like Rocks and Plants by David Brodeur 

celestial-1

As part of his Celestial Series, Chicago-based digital artist David Brodeur rendered an alien world filled with berry-like plants, glowing crystals, and candy shaped orbs that sprout from the ground. Despite their exotic designs, Brodeur relies on common colors of familiar fruits to create this Willy Wonka-esque habitat where you can’t help but want to reach out and gobble everything up. You can see more from the series on Behance, and he also posts a new digital piece each day on Instagram.

celestial-2

celestial-3

celestial-4

celestial-5

celestial-6

celestial-7

celestial-8

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Wrapped: A Stunning Animated Time-lapse that Depicts Powerful Plants Reclaiming New York 

There have been countless films set against the backdrop of a post-apocalyptic New York teeming with wildlife and overgrown with plants, both Planet of the Apes and I Am Legend come to mind. In this animated short titled Wrapped from Roman Kaelin, Falko Paeper and Florian Wittmann, we instead see the demise of the city as a vivid time-lapse that blends real footage, CG, and several of its own science fiction twists. The time-lapse begins with the death of a small rat that sets in motion the complete demise of the city’s human-made infrastructure that is quickly razed by super powerful vines. They share about the project:

“Wrapped” is a VFX driven short film by Roman Kälin, Falko Paeper and Florian Wittmann that combines Time Lapse Photography with CG to create a new reality. The short explores the effects of time and change focusing on the the world’s seemingly never ending cycles. The deterioration of one is the foundation for another. This fact takes on new dimensions when the unexpected forces of nature clash with the existing structures of our civilization.

Wrapped was originally released in 2014 and was screened at over 100 festivals picking up tons of accolades along the way. The film was made viewable online for the first time ever today. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

bg_01_bridge1

bg_02_tower

bg_03_farn

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , , .

Otherworldly Metal Organisms Welded by Mylinh Nguyen 

nguyen-1

Inspired by animalistic forms both living and extinct, artist Mylinh Nguyen welds alien creatures from brass, bronze, and silver. Using a variety of machining techniques each creature takes form over several weeks, originating first as haphazard sketches in a notebook before evolving into permanent metal forms. Nguyen is a master of articulating even the most minute skeletal details of imaginary beings with metal, such as her seed-pod-meets-jellyfish series Meduses or her 2012 series of aquatic life, Sous-Marins. Nguyen currently has several pieces on view at the Les 3 CHA centre d’art in Châteaugiron, France. (via Lustik)

nguyen-2

nguyen-3

nguyen-4

nguyen-5-1

nguyen-5

nguyen-6-1

nguyen-6

nguyen-7

nguyen-8

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

The Visually Stunning ‘Tesseract’ Scene in Interstellar was Filmed on a Physically Constructed Set 

interstellar-2

Spoiler alert. One of the most jaw-dropping moments of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar is the climactic moment when Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) enters a visually stunning environment that allows him to physically communicate through time using gravity. In the movie, the scene is manifested as a small library in his home that appears to infinitely repeat with versions of every moment that has ever occurred there. Essentially it’s a cube in four dimensions. Here’s a pretty good explanation of how it works:

The Tesseract is a means of communication for the bulk beings to express action through gravity with NASA. The bulk beings can perceive five dimensions as opposed to four, able to see every moment in the past, present, and future as well as influence gravity within any of those time frames. […] The tesseract allowed Cooper to communicate with Murphy Cooper [his daughter] in various time periods, presenting time itself as a dimension rather than linear. Everything is linked by the strings of time, which Cooper can manipulate. The beings made this comprehensible to Cooper by allowing him to physically interact with the Tesseract.

The idea of the tesseract scene alone was so daunting to the filmmakers, Nolan and his special effects team procrastinated for months before trying to tackle how it might work. After months of concepting and model building the team opted for the unusual approach of using minimal digital effects in favor of fabricating a massive set which the actors could physically manipulate. A remarkable feat considering not only the complexity of the concepts depicted, but the cost and labor of building something so large.

Included here are some shots of the set, a behind-the-scenes interview with Nolan and a number of people from the visual effects team explaining how it was done, and lastly the scene itself. You can watch even more of it here. (via Fubiz)

interstellar-1

interstellar-3

interstellar-4

interstellar-5

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Playful New Murals and Paintings by ‘Wes21’ Fuse Technology, Humor, and the Natural World 

wes21-3

wes21-4

With a keen sense of humor and superb control of a spray can, Swiss artist Remo Lienhard (aka Wes21) covers both walls and canvases with his playful sythesis of science fiction and the natural world. The artist imagines a hybrid spaceship ladybug as it blasts into the sky and pair of airborne lighthouses are revealed to be the bodies of ominous looking squid. Lienhard works in a variety of mediums from smaller acrylic and spray pieces on canvas to larger murals that often make use of surrounding objects.

Lienhard is a member of a collective of graffiti artists and illustrators called Schwarzmaler and is represented by SOON, and you can see more recent work on his Facebook.

wes21-5

wes21-2
Wes21 & ONUR

wes21-1

wes21-6
Wes21 & ONUR

wes21-7

wes21-8

wes21-10

wes21-9-redo

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Simon Stålenhag’s Retro Sci-Fi Images of a Dystopian Swedish Countryside Published In Two New Books 

simon-11

Across the backdrop of an expansive retro-Scandinavian landscape, Swedish illustrator Simon Stålenhag has spent the last few years imagining a world of science fiction inhabited by roaming mech robots, dinosaurs, and other technological innovations plopped right onto the Swedish countryside. The digitally painted images spread far and wide across the internet over the last few years, capturing the imagination of legions of fantasy and sci-fi fans who clamoured for comic books and even a feature film. For now, we’ll have to make do with old-fashioned art books.

Stålenhag and Free League Publishing just announced a Kickstarter project for two new books featuring Stålenhag’s dystopian vision of the future that will pair illustrations with short stories written in English. You can explore many more illustrations on his website (just start scrolling), and some are available as individual prints.

simon-2

simon-3

simon-4

simon-5

simon-6

simon-7

simon-8

simon-9

simon-10

simon-1

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 1 of 3123