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Art

The Second Annual Nuart Aberdeen Festival Activates the Scottish Town With Installations Inspired by National and Regional Themes

May 14, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

SNIK, image © Brian Tallman

SNIK, image © Brian Tallman

It was 2002 when an international group of street art and electronic music enthusiasts organized the first Nuart Festival in Norway’s oil capital, Stavanger. The idea was to create a secondary event for their music program in order to introduce some of the most interesting artists of the underground street art movement. Keeping their concept simple yet original, the festival presented an annual platform for national and international artists who operated outside of the traditional art establishment, both indoors and outdoors, to stimulate conversation that would challenge the notions of what art is, and what it can be.

It wasn’t long before the visual part of the project continued on its own and grew into what’s now widely considered to be the world’s leading celebration of street art among its peers. It was around the 15th year of the festival when founder and director Martyn Reed and his team were approached by the city of Aberdeen, Scotland with an idea to develop a similar project in their own town. After years of rejecting similar offers, the team felt a strong connection and similarities between the two oil industry-dependent cities, and in 2017 the first edition of Nuart Aberdeen (previously) was introduced to the public.

The 2nd edition of this festival was held only a few weeks ago, and once again brought the Granite City to the spotlight of the international urban and street art scene. Nuart Aberdeen invited well-established artists who first started their careers at Nuart in Stavanger, such as Bordalo II and Ernest Zacharevic, which helped introduce a wide range and vibrancy of contemporary street art to the young festival. Working with local themes and subjects, but within their individual visual languages and mediums, the international line-up of artists produced an impressive series of public murals, installations, and interventions, which brightened up the daily routines of locals, and provided a new attraction for the festival’s visitors.

Addressing themes like the relationship between UK and Scotland (Hyuro), regional history and legends (Bordalo II, Milu Correch, Nimi & RH74, Phlegm), or referring to local specifics such as the lively seagull population (Conzo & Globel; Ernest Zacharevic or Snik), the public works covered topics that locals could easily identify with and engage. And while these pieces were being created on the streets and alleys of the Grey City, selected group of academics were discussing and presenting the past, current, and possible future state of the movement, in the presence of local and international enthusiasts, fans, and members of the creative community.

Always highlighting the activism side of public art, this year’s edition included a project with Amnesty International, presenting their project in support of women human rights defenders in the UK. For this part of the project the team joined forces with “craftivist” Carrie Reichardt who designed an elaborate ceramic mosaic that celebrates Scotland’s woman human rights defenders and the Suffragette movement. The London-based contemporary ceramicist also created “We are Witches” and “Trailblazing Women of Aberdeen,” borrowing the aesthetics of traditional stain glass windows. She also helped create a public monument to local unsung heroes which was fully designed, cut, and installed by local volunteers under the stewardship of Reichardt.

Bordalo II, image © Brian Tallman

Bordalo II, image © Brian Tallman

Ernest Zacharevic, image © Ian Cox

Ernest Zacharevic, image © Ian Cox

Hyuro, image © Brian Tallman

Hyuro, image © Brian Tallman

Milu Correch, image © Brian Tallman

Milu Correch, image © Brian Tallman

Phlegm, image © Brian Tallman

Phlegm, image © Brian Tallman

Nimi & RH74, image © Ian Cox

Nimi & RH74, image © Ian Cox

Dr. D, © image Ian Cox

Dr. D, © image Ian Cox

Carrie Reichardt, © image Ian Cox

Carrie Reichardt, © image Ian Cox

Carrie Reichardt, © image Ian Cox

Carrie Reichardt, © image Ian Cox

 

 



Design History

A Modern Solar-Powered Home Built Within the Ruins of an 18th-Century Farmhouse

May 9, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Architects Nathanael Dorent and Lily Jencks recently collaborated to build a sleek, modern home within the existing ruins of an 18th-century farmhouse. The home is built on a hill that overlooks more than 50 miles of Scotland’s pastoral fields and combines elements of both the old and new world. The structure features white, futuristic walls that wind throughout the length of its interior, which is completely powered by exterior solar panels. Although there are some updated elements, the structure still sits within the original stones of the farmhouse, and is topped by a pitched roof similar to the one that would have sheltered the old Scottish house.

While building the structure, Dorent and Jencks used their admiration of specific views seen from the farmhouse as inspiration for custom windows. One particular oval opening in the wall looks directly onto a nearby field of cows perfectly set against a backdrop of rolling hills. You can learn more about the new home and the philosophy behind its construction on Dorent’s website. (via Fubiz)

 

 



Art

Kelpies Timelapse: Watch the Construction of Andy Scott’s 100 Ft. Steel Equine Statues

April 10, 2014

Christopher Jobson

Although major construction on Andy Scott’s imposing ‘Kelpies’ sculptures near Falkirk, Scotland ended last November, this new timelapse from the Helix captures the enormity of the project in vivid detail. The gargantuan horse head sculptures completely dominate an otherwise flat landscape over the Forth & Clyde canal and promise to be a major attraction when they open to the public on April 21. The construction part takes up the first half of the video, you can jump to around 3:00 if you want to see pretty shots of the completed pieces. (via MeFi)

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timelapse-2

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Art

Giant ‘Kelpies’ Horse Head Sculptures Tower Over the Forth & Clyde Canal in Scotland

November 12, 2013

Christopher Jobson

kelpies-1

Kit Downey

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Barry Ferguson

kelpies-3

Barry Ferguson

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Tracey Russell

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Tracey Russell

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Tracey Russell

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Trixta Photography

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Trixta Photography

Currently in the last stages of construction after nearly 7 years of development, the Kelpies are a pair of gargantuan horse heads by public artist Andy Scott that now tower over the Forth & Clyde canal in Falkirk, Scotland. The sculptures measure some 30 meters tall (99 ft.) and are meant as a monument to the horse-powered heritage of Scotland. According to Wikipedia:

The Kelpies name reflected the mythological transforming beasts possessing the strength and endurance of 10 horses; a quality that is analogous with the transformational change and endurance of Scotland’s inland waterways. The Kelpies represent the lineage of the heavy horse of Scottish industry and economy, pulling the wagons, ploughs, barges and coalships that shaped the geographical layout of the Falkirk area.

The sculptures were modeled on two actual Clydesdales from Glasgow City and were constructed from structural steel with a stainless steel cladding, creating structures that you will soon be able to stand inside of. Although construction is nearly complete, the Kelpies will not open to visitors until April 2014.

Scott has created a number of smaller ‘Kelpies’ sculptures including a pair here in Chicago and at Purdue University. Photos above courtesy Kit Downey, Tracey Russell, Barry Ferguson, and Trixta Photography.

 

 

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