Tag Archives: sculpture

Blooming Kinetic Sculptures Built with Wire by Casey Curran 

Seattle-based artist Casey Curran constructs elaborate kinetic sculptures primarily of brass wire that twist, bloom, flip, or wiggle depending on the subject. Some pieces rely on a motorized mechanism, but most of his artworks function with the help of a single hand crank that brings the piece to life. His latest piece titled “Bequeath these Seeds” was made for the 2016 Bellevue Arts Museum biennial show titled “Metalmorphosis”. Curran shares more of his latest kinetic works—including a kinetic cheetoh man—on Instagram.

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Geometric Portraits Constructed with Reclaimed Wood by ‘Strook’ 

Working with recycled wood doors and paneling pulled from old houses, Belgian artist Stefaan De Croock aka Strook (previously) constructs both large and small-scale geometric portraits. Each piece is designed individually using multiple fragments of cut wood which he mixes and matches to form a sort of color palette. He also creates similar works on canvas.

Strook’s most recent piece was an enormous wooden assemblage for the Crystal Ship, a new art festival in Ostend, Belgium now in its second year. You can see more of his recent work on Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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People I Saw But Never Met: Thousands of Miniature Metal Figurines by Zadok Ben-David 

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

Taking notice of the countless people we witness as a backdrop to our daily lives seems like an impossible task, but for artist Zadok Ben-David (previously) this myriad of anonymous people form the basis of his installation People I Saw But Never Met. Comprised of over 3,000 chemically etched miniature figures displayed at varying proportions, each individual is pulled from photographs taken by Ben-David during his travels across Europe, the United States, Central Asia, Australia, and Antarctica, creating a diverse assemblage of various cultures and people.

Shown individually, the two-dimensional sketch-like sculptures seem to depict the mundane moments in the lives of average citizens, tourists, and even pets, but viewed collectively the installation offers a unique snapshot of humanity at a certain moment in time. “Ben-David’s sculptural milieu comes at a critical point in our current socio-political climate,” says Shoshana Wayne Gallery, “where heated debates about exclusion and borders versus inclusivity and multiplicity are part of our daily experience.”

People I Saw But Never Met has been installed in various configurations since 2015 and is currently on view at Shoshana Wayne Gallery in Santa Monica through May 27, 2017. This new installation incorporates thousands of smaller figures along with 45 much larger hand-cut aluminum figures installed in a large gallery space. You can see more views here. (via Design Milk)

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2015, detail.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

“People I Saw But Never Met,” 2017, detail. Courtesy Shoshana Wayne Gallery.

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Repurposed Antique Dishware Sandblasted Into Bas-Relief Sculptures by Caroline Slotte 

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 24 cm Collection West Norway Museum of Decorative Art, Bergen (N)

Trying to imagine the original state of these rough-edged antique plates is part of the intention behind these sculptures by Helskini-based artist Caroline Slotte (previously), whose artworks often involve aspects of memory and the physical reduction of objects while still retaining the original meaning. For her 2015 series Tracing, Slotte reworked several ceramic plates utilizing a complex sequence of masking and sandblasting to transform painted 2D images into textural 3D reliefs. She explains in an interview with the Houston Center for Contemporary Craft:

In [the] Tracing Series, I used a process of repeated masking and sandblasting to remove the glaze and the printed imagery step-by-step. When sandblasting the sand eats away on everything hard. Anything soft and flexible, such as the glue I use for masking, remains, the sand cannot penetrate it. I work my way down, layer by layer, rendering the motif three-dimensional, until the image is transformed into something resembling an imprint or an X-ray, as though a memory of the image had sunk into the plate.

Through each artwork Slotte references not only the history of an image applied to a plate, but also the second-hand object itself, while creating something entirely new. You can see more of her work at Ferrin Contemporary.

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 22 cm

From the series Tracing, 2015. Reworked second hand ceramics. Ø 27 cm

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Smashed Can Sculptures That Mimic Traditional Ming Dynasty Porcelain by Lei Xue 

Adopting traditional decorative motifs found on Ming Dynasty ceramics, Chinese artist Lei Xue sculpted these humorous smashed aluminum cans that bridge the gap of some 600 years of art history. The pieces are part of an ongoing series titled Drinking Tea, and unlike the mechanical process of producing cans, each object is sculpted and painted by hand. You can see more of Xue’s work at Martina Detterer Gallery. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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New Sculptural Eyewear Produced From Salvaged Street Metal and Found Objects by Cyrus Kabiru 

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: At the Dot, 2017. 59 1/10 × 47 1/5 in

Self-taught Kenyan artist Cyrus Kabiru (previously) fashions extravagant eyewear from pieces of found metal and other salvaged materials on the streets of his hometown of Nairobi. Kabiru has been building his futuristic glasses since childhood, and dedicates much of his time to producing works for his C-Stunner series of eyeglasses and coordinating photographs. Recently Kabiru has begun to expand his work to include large non-body-based sculptures, installations, and collage.

Kabiru’s practice is deeply tied to Afrofuturism, a genre that combines science fiction, magical realism, and historical fiction with the culture and politics of the African diaspora. His work was featured in the newly released Gestalten publication Africa Rising: Fashion, Design and Lifestyle from Africa. You can see more of his eyewear and larger sculptures on Artsy and SMAC.

Kubwa Macho Nne – American Darts, 2015.

Kubwa Macho Nne – Tom and Jerry (2015)

Mali Ya Mfalme, Macho Nne | Nubia Kale (Ancient Nubia), 2016

Njia Ya Maisha Macho Nne Throwback, 2015

Njia Ya Maisha, Macho Nne Egyptian Peacock, 2015

Kwa Kubadilishana Utamaduni, Macho Nne: Catalan Sun, 2017

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