Tag Archives: sculpture

Dripping Glass Fusion “Jellyfish” Sculptures by Daniela Forti 

Artist Daniela Forti lives and works in Chianti, Tuscany where she produces these fantastic artworks of dripped glass. She refers to the pieces as “Jellyfish” because of their undulating tentacles that are formed by hand through a melted glass fusion process. Each piece appears to balance like a small platter or table atop colorful, spindly drips that somehow manage to support the weight above. Many examples of her work are on view (and also available) over at Artemest.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Kinetic Cast Glass Sculptures by Heike Brachlow 

German glass artist Heike Brachlow finds inspiration in architecture and geometry, creating cast glass sculptures that rely heavily on their shape, which is often that of a cylinder or cube. Works in her Theme and Variation series seem to impossibly balance as they subtly curve upwards, individual cubes colored with the same mixture of oxides at increasing amounts. Her pink work, seen below, contains neodymium oxide which causes it to change color in different lights, shifting from a pink to green hue depending on which light the glass sculpture is displayed under.

In addition to having disparate color properties, many of the pieces can be taken apart and rearranged, inviting her audience to create unique stacks of their own, and perhaps mix-up the provided gradient. Other works, like those in her cylindrical Waiting series, are formed in a way that allows the top component to spin effortlessly on its base. Her On Reflection series also has a similar kinetic quality, with twirling glass pieces that appear more like spinning tops than silos.

Brachlow discovered her love for glass while working as a glassblower in a small studio in Rotorua, New Zealand. She received her BA from the University of Wolverhampton and MA and PhD from the Royal College of Art in London and regularly teaches glass blowing classes at the Corning Museum of Glass and other institutions. You can find her work in the collections of the Glasmuseum Hentrich in Dusseldorf, Germany, Glasmuseum alter Hof Herding in Coesfeld, Germany, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Washington and more.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Large New Embroidered Textile Moths and Cicadas by Yumi Okita 

These oversized moths and insects by Yumi Okita (previously) are constructed with fabric, embroidery thread, fake fur, wire, and feathers. The Raleigh-based artist makes each piece by hand, creating faithful interpretations of actual insects like the Oleander Hawk Moth or the Peacock Butterfly. You can see many of her most recent creations on Etsy.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

A Gigantic Buddha Statue Emerges from the Top of a Hill in Japan 

Unless otherwise noted, all photographs by Shigeo Ogawa.

Normally a cemetery wouldn’t be on our list of recommended sites to see, but the Makomanai Cemetery is one of the most awe-inspiring places we’ve ever been. Located in the outskirts of Sapporo, a large stone Buddha occupies the sprawling landscape. All 1,500 tons of it has sat alone there for 15 years. But when the cemetery decided they wanted to do something to increase visitor’s appreciations for the Buddha, they enlisted architect Tadao Ando, who had a grand and bold idea: hide the statue.

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

“Our idea was to cover the Buddha below the head with a hill of lavender plants,” said Ando. Indeed, as you approach “Hill of Buddha” the subject is largely concealed by a hill planted with 150,000 lavenders. Only the top of the statue’s head pokes out from the rotunda, creating a visual connection between the lavender plants and the ringlets of hair on the Buddha statue’s head.

Upon entering, visitors are forced to turn left or right and walk around a rectangular lake of water before entering the 131-ft (40-meter) long approach tunnel. The journey is a constant reminder of the weather, the breeze and the light, and is works in tandem to heighten anticipation of the statue, which is only visible once you reach the end of the tunnel.

Any time of the year, visitors will have a different experience. The 150,000 lavenders “turn fresh green in spring, pale purple in summer and silky white with snow in winter.” It really is a miraculous work of environmental art. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Household Objects Overgrown With Sprouted Wooden Limbs by Camille Kachani 

Lebanese-Brazilian artist Camille Kachani creates humorous wooden sculptures that directly reference their origin, weaving root systems into household objects like chairs and shelves, while sprouting leafy plants from the handles of hammers and hedge clippers. Due to their overgrown state, the sculptures he builds are rendered unusable, almost as if their original material is attempting to reclaim the carved form. Garden tools like a shovel and a hoe appear to come alive, fake leaves covering the branches that have forked from their wooden base.

You can see more of Kachani’s works through Sao Paulo’s Zipper Galeria where he is currently represented.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 2 of 1441234...»