sculpture

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Art Craft

A Tree-Like Figure Composed of Natural and Technological Elements by Garret Kane

October 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest sculpture by assemblage artist Garret Kane (previously) combines moss, tree branches, and other natural elements with technological components to create a towering 7-foot-tall sculpture. The tree-like figure is Kane’s amalgamation of two protectors from vastly different cultural backgrounds. The first is the ancient Judaic Golem made from mud and sticks, and the second inspiration is the Japanese Mecha, a large protector composed of advanced robotics.

Kane combined elements from both traditions to create the Golemecha, a creature with powers tied to nature and advanced technologies. Using materials from tree roots to 3D printed parts, he built the complex model as a figure who would protect our natural world from the new technologies that threaten its existence. You can see more of Kane’s fantastical assemblages on his website and Behance.

 

 



Design

Fluorescent Cacti and Leaf Sculptures by Nobel Truong

October 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

LA-based industrial designer Nobel Truong has created an extensive line of acrylic plant objects including translucent cacti, lamps, leaves, and other accessories. From her artist statement:

Inspired by Bauhaus architecture and the Memphis Group, the Truong’s collection aims to cast a postmodern take on everyday household objects while incorporating the structural forms of modern architecture. Every piece is designed, engineered, and produced in California.

You can see much more on Instagram and her online shop. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Art

Three-Dimensional Portraits of Suspended Paint Strokes by Chris Dorosz

October 24, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Rather than considering paint as a liquid medium, San Francisco-based artist Chris Dorosz uses the traditional material as a unit of measure to form anonymous sculptural portraits. At first glance, the three-dimensional paintings read as abstract compilations of shapes, and only once the viewer looks head-on at the portrait does a human figure begin to emerge.

As he writes in his artist statement, Dorosz considers the paint drop to be “a form that takes shape not from a brush or any human-made implement or gesture, but purely from its own viscosity and the air it falls through, as analogous to the building blocks that make up the human body (DNA) or even its mimetic representation (the pixel).”

Dorosz is represented by Scott Richards Contemporary Art. The suite of four busts, entitled Rosh, is on view November 18, 2017 at the Muriel Guépin Gallery in New York.

 

 



Art

A Towering Hammered Steel Lion by Selçuk Yılmaz

October 22, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Sculptor Selçuk Yılmaz (previously) recently finished work on this gigantic lion sculpture of hammered and welded metal titled Kali. The Turkish artist has mastered the ability to form the flowing mane, facial features, and bold muscular structure of various large cats from curled steel fragments. You can see many of his earlier works over on Behance.

 

 



Art Science

An 80-Foot Steel Kraken Will Create an Artificial Coral Reef Near the British Virgin Islands

October 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All images via Owen Buggy

This past April a massive 80-foot steel kraken was purposefully sunk into the Caribbean Sea on top of a decorated WW2 ship. The former Navy fuel barge and its monstrous passenger were placed underwater in order to jumpstart a new coral ecosystem, while also serving as a cutting-edge education center for marine researchers and local students from the surrounding British Virgin Islands. The project is titled the BVI Art Reef, and aims to use sculptures like the porous kraken as a base to grow transplanted coral.

The Kodiak Queen, formerly a Navy fuel barge named the YO-44, was discovered by British photographer Owen Buggy approximately two and a half years ago on the island of Tortola. Instead of letting the historic vessel get picked apart for scrap metal, Buggy approached former boss Sir Richard Branson about collaborating on a restorative art installation. Together with nonprofit Unite B.V.I., artist group Secret Samurai Productions, social justice entrepreneurial group Maverick1000, and ocean education nonprofit Beneath the Waves, the project was established as both an eco-friendly art installation, and a philanthropic measure to rehabilitate native marine species.

“It’s envisioned that within just a short space of time the ship and artwork will attract a myriad of sea creatures,” said Clive Petrovic who consults on the environmental impact of the BVI Art Reef. “Everything from corals to sea sponges, sharks and turtles will live on, in, and around the wreck. The ship will become valuable for future research by scientists and local students alike.”

To sink the massive ship, the project sought the help of the Commercial Dive Services who safely submerged the vessel off the coast of the island Virgin Gorda. It was the first time the ship had been in the water for nearly 17 years, and was lead to its final resting place by a bevy of boats and helicopters.

Filmmaker Rob Sorrenti filmed both the construction and sinking of the kraken and its ship. The full-length documentary is currently in post-production, with an estimated release early next year. You can watch a clip from the upcoming film below. For information on visiting the BVI Art Reef, and to learn more about its educational programs, visit the project’s website and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Beetle Sculptures Encrusted with Minerals by Nozomi

October 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paris-based artist Nozomi created these glistening beetle specimens through a process of digital sculpting, 3d printing, and good old-fashioned lacquer painting. The works are a continuation of an ongoing series where she explores the backs of beetles as a backdrop for her ditigal work. Nozomi is selling a few of the pieces on Etsy and you can follow her on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Food

Decadent Pastries Formed From Porcelain and Glass by Shayna Leib

October 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos by Eric Tadsen

Glass artist Shayna Leib (previously), like anyone, is deeply attracted to the seductive pull of decadent desserts. Unlike most however, Leib is unable to indulge. Her body reacts to several aspects of puffed pastries and chocolate mouses, causing her to have many severe dietary restrictions. It was this void that pulled her towards the desire to work with the unattainable, to recreate the objects she couldn’t eat.

“This body of work started as a therapeutic exercise in deconstruction and a re-training of the mind to look at dessert as form rather than food,” says Leib in an artist statement about her series Patisserie. “It soon became a technical riddle, and I became a food taxidermist of french pastries.”

To create the glossy sculptures she combines elements of porcelain and glass, utilizing nearly every technique for both to achieve the hyperrealistic quality of each faux dessert. Like a typical French pastry would be rolled, glazed, baked, and trimmed, Leib hot-sculpts, fuses, casts, grinds, throws, and even pipes with a theme-appropriate pastry tube. You can view more of her sweet imitations on her website, Instagram, and Facebook.

 

 

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