sculpture

Posts tagged
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Art Design

Fabric Tree Stumps Formed From Pieces of Discarded Clothing by Tamara Kostianovsky

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Roni Mocan unless otherwise noted

Textile artist Tamara Kostianovsky creates realistic elements from nature out of strips of fabric and discarded clothing. In her latest series, the artist forms severed tree stumps from pieces of her late father’s clothing, integrating his belongings into a landscape of layered, multi-colored logs. The works address the passing of time and allude to the body returning to the environment after death.

The project is inspired by the South American people of the Andes who believe that Mother Earth is embodied by the surrounding mountains. Kostianovsky translates this idea to placing clothing items into sculptures that represent the earth and its environment. She explains in an artist statement: “Fusing the shapes of severed tree stumps of different forms and sizes to a palette indicative of the insides of the body, [the series Tree Stumps] pays homage to the cultural heritage of the people of Latin America, while presenting an alternative way of thinking about our post-industrial relationship to nature.”

Kostianovsky became entranced with the body while working at a surgeon’s office during her adolescence. She continues to make work that examines muscle and bone, often in other species such as livestock or whales. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio by visiting her Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Photo courtesy of Wave Hill

 

 



Art Science

The Human Microbiome Reimagined as a Cut-Paper Coral Reef by Rogan Brown

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Using the visual metaphor of a coral reef, artist Rogan Brown (previously) introduces his audience to the diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi found in the human body through paper-based sculptures. The detailed works are created after months of research and hunting for aesthetic parallels that might link the two surprisingly similar worlds.

His series Magical Circle Variations merge these sources of inspiration with a pastel color scheme that can also be found in a coral habitat. “What the reef and the microbiome have in common is that they both consist of biodiverse colonies of organisms that coexist more or less harmoniously,” Brown explains. “There are further parallels between coral and human beings in that we are both symbiont organisms, that is we depend on a mutually beneficial relationship with another species: coral only receive their beautiful colors from varieties of algae that live on them and human beings can only exist thanks to the unimaginably huge and diverse number of bacteria that live in and on them.”

Brown hopes that his intricate paper sculptures will allow his audience to more greatly conceptualize the bacteria-based landscape of the human body. Works like these will be exhibited with C Fine Art at the upcoming Art Market Hamptons July 5-8, 2018. You can see more of his work on his website.

 

 



Art

Impractical Wooden Furniture Created to Blend Into its Natural Environment

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

Hugh Hayden builds furniture not intended for human use, crafting benches and chairs from pieces of wood without removing the original branches or twigs. In these sculptural works the stray forms make it nearly impossible to use the object as a piece of furniture. The shape an Adirondack chair is present, like in his piece The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas, yet its impediments make sitting an uncomfortable challenge.

Hayden’s imbedded branches serve as a camouflage system that explores how his designed objects might blend into a natural landscape. His piece “Brier Patch,” which features six carved school desks, “juxtaposes the organic, unpredictability of the natural world (e.g. undergrowth,
a thicket etc.) with the ordered and disciplined pursuit of education and greater civilization,” he explains. “The branches extending from the desks are entangled and materialize this integration into the landscape or environment, creating a visible, unifying space, that is at once protective and impenetrable.”

His solo exhibition at White Columns runs through June 2, 2018, and is his first in New York City. Hayden recently received is MFA in Sculpture from Columbia University, and his Bachelor of Architecture from Cornell University in 2007. You can see more of his sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"The Jones: Part 2" (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

“The Jones: Part 2” (2017), sculpted fallen trees from Manhattan, 66 x 72 x 48 inches

"Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

“Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of "Brier Patch" (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

Detail of “Brier Patch” (2018), sculpted wood and hardware, dimensions variable

"Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

“Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of "Hangers" (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

Detail of “Hangers” (2018), sculpted wood and garment rack, 60 x 66 x 30 inches

"The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas" (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

“The Jones and Other Borrowed Ideas” (2017), sculpted fallen hemlock, 40 x 48 x 53 inches

"Untitled Lexus Dash" (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

“Untitled Lexus Dash” (2017), sculpted wood from Harlem park, 60 x 48 x 42 inches

 

 



Art

The Magnetic Force of Urs Fischer’s Life-Size Metallic Rhinoceros

May 29, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Robert McKeever. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

Things stands poised as the singular sculpture in a new installation by Swiss artist Urs Fischer, yet like its title might suggest, the lone work is composed of several disparate parts. At the piece’s core stands a life-size aluminum copy of a rhinoceros with a magnetic presence that has attracted several man-made objects into its grand orbit. A vacuum cleaner, step stool, toilet, car door, and frying pan all cling to its wrinkled metallic skin.

The work questions one’s attraction to and use of everyday objects, considering how and what we accumulate as we move through our individualized worlds. “‘Art’ has always been a word for this thing that can’t be rationalized, when you see or hear something that you struggle to explain,” says Fischer in a press release about Things. “But that’s its strength, of course.”

The massive aluminum work is on view at a disused bank at 511 Fifth Avenue in midtown Manhattan through June 23, 2018. This installation coincides with Fischer’s exhibition of new paintings titled Sōtatsu, which also runs through June 23 at Gagosian Gallery's 980 Madison Avenue location. (via The New York Times)

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, "Things" (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

URS FISCHER, “Things” (2017), Milled aluminum, steel, power magnets, two-component epoxy adhesive, 125 1/4 x 204 3/8 x 118 1/2 inches (318 x 519 x 301 cm), Edition 1 of 3 & 1 AP, © Urs Fischer. Photo: Stefan Altenburger. Courtesy of the artist and Gagosian.

 

 

 



Art

Hand-Dyed Crocheted Thread Carefully Covers Eggs, Seeds, and Tree Trunks

May 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Esther Traugot connects to the natural world by collecting and covering seed pods, eggs, severed tree trunks, and other natural objects in tightly-wrapped textile “skins.” She uses hand-dyed gold threads to crochet around these objects in order to temporarily mend what has previously been broken or abandoned. Through her work Traugot straddles the line of nurture and control, investigating her dual role as a member and observer of the natural landscape.

“The meticulous act of crocheting mimics the instinct to nurture and protect what is viable, what is becoming precious,” she explains in an artist statement. “As in gilding, these false ‘skins’ imbue the objects with an assumed desirability or value; the wrapping becomes an act of veneration. Although futile in its attempt at archiving and preservation, it suggests optimism.”

Traugot is interested in “contemporary naturalism,” or artwork that cares for the environment in our current global ecological state, and also views her work in conversation with Land and Environmental Art and Feminism. She received her BFA from the University of California Berkeley in 2005 and her MFA from Mills College in 2009. Traugot is represented by Chandra Cerrito Contemporary Gallery in Oakland, California, and currently lives and works in Sebastopol, CA. You can view more of her gold threaded objects on her website.

 

 



Art Design

Interior Bas-Relief Sculptures of Peacocks and Lush Florals by Goga Tandashvili

May 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Russian artist Goga Tandashvili carves large-scale bas-relief works in interior spaces, adding details such as florals, tropical leaves, and perched peacocks to otherwise flat surfaces. The three-dimensional murals project from the wall with a life-like accuracy, with each bloom and sprout of plumage having the same shape and size as the object it imitates. Tandashvili uses a combination of hand building and carving techniques to create the nature-based sculptures, which act as fluid extensions of the wall itself. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Sponsor

San Francisco’s Exploratorium Presents Inflatable, an Exhibition of Gigantic Air-filled Artworks (Sponsor)

May 22, 2018

Colossal

Explore, play, and wonder at gigantic, fantastical, artworks at Inflatable a new summer exhibition at the Exploratorium, San Francisco’s iconic museum of art, science, and human perception.

Curated by Christopher Jobson, founder and editor-in-chief of Colossal, Inflatable features artwork by Tasmanian environmental artist Amanda Parer, balloon sculptor Jason Hackenwerth, interactive artist and educator Jimmy Kuehnle, technology-inspired designer Shih Chieh Huang, and Rhode Island collective Pneuhaus. Massive air-filled, human-like figures will fill the museum from floor to ceiling, along with dynamic sculptures of otherworldly organisms, a forest of cushiony columns, an inflatable insect-eye room, and more. Even visitors familiar with the Exploratorium will see the space in a new way.

Rated the #1 Museum in San Francisco on TripAdvisor, the Exploratorium is more than a museum. Visitors of all ages can step inside a tornado, turn upside down in a giant curved mirror, walk on a fog bridge, and explore more than 650 hands-on exhibits. The museum offers all of this plus unique programs, discussions, and events; a café and restaurant; two stores; and more at its beautiful San Francisco waterfront location on the historic Embarcadero.

Located between the historic Ferry Building and Pier 39, the Exploratorium is a short distance from any of these popular attractions: Fisherman’s Wharf, the Alcatraz ferries, and downtown.

  • Daily Summer Hours (May 26–September 3), 10am–5pm (All ages)
  • After Dark Thursday Evenings, 6–10pm (Ages 18+)
  • Friday Evening Extended Hours (July 6–August 31), 10am–9pm (All Ages)

Entry to Inflatable is included with museum admission.

Learn more at exploratorium.edu/inflatable and follow the Exploratorium on FacebookTwitter & Instagram.