Tag Archives: sculpture

Imaginative Insects Formed From Resin and Brass by Hiroshi Shinno 

Japanese artist Hiroshi Shinno builds hyperrealistic sculptures of insects that don’t exist, perfect forms of imaginative species that look as if they were built from vibrant leaves and delicate flower petals. Even these aspects of the creatures are false, as each leaf or petal was cast from resin and painted with acrylic paint before being placed on the model’s brass base.

In addition to building these fantastical works, Shinno also sketches the initial ideas for his imaginative creatures in an Insect Diary on his website. You can see more of the Kyoto-born artist’s insect-based sculptures and 3D work on his Tumblr. (via Lustik)

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Miniature Environments and Relief Sculptures Incorporated into Stones and the Backs of Animals by Song Kang 

Portland-based artist and illustrator Song Kang creates highly textural work, whether that’s in her drawn explorations or sculptures produced from found and natural materials. Her miniature works are dream-like environments and houses, many built on backs of animals like oxen and camels. Kang likes to imagine these sculptures as visual scavenger hunts, and often inserts even tinier occupants that sit and stand around her micro-cities.

For her Carved in Stone series, Kang imposes architectural forms onto the surfaces of found rocks. “The structures follow the curvature of the rocks, skewing the perspective and creating surreal environments,” Kang shares. “By becoming part of the surface rather than projecting outwards, the architecture becomes almost textural, a relief sculpture.”

You can see more of Kang’s two and three dimensional work on her Instagram and Behance.

   

 

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New Porcelain Sculptures That Merge Female Forms With Elements of Nature by Juliette Clovis 

“Atsu Bashiri”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze, red and gold hand painted. 34x35x24cm

French artist Juliette Clovis (previously) works primarily with female busts, mutating the forms to adopt animal or floral-based characteristics. Using both the 2D application of paint, and 3D addition of ceramics, she covers the females that she sculpts in horns, quills, and blooms. In some works the natural elements look as if they merge with the bust, while others appear overtaken, such as in the piece Memento mori (2016). In this piece Clovis’ white figure is almost entirely covered in flowers, with minimal elements of her face barely peaking out from its blanket of ceramic blossoms.

Clovis will have a solo exhibition of her work at Gallery Mondapart in Paris titled “Baroque Curiosities” opening March 23 and running through May 4, 2017. You can see more images of Clovis’ hybrid porcelain forms on her Instagram and website. (via Faith is Torment)

“Atsu Bashiri”, detail.

“Atsu Bashiri”, detail.

“Memento mori”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze and white biscuit.

“Memento mori”, 2016.

“Mazama”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white glaze, blue cobalt hand painted.

“Mazama”, detail.

“Heteractis magnifica”, 2016. Limoges porcelain, white biscuit and white glaze.

“Heteractis magnifica”, detail.

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Handmade Ceramic Blooms and Succulents by Owen Mann 

Self-taught artist Owen Mann creates ceramic blooms from dozens, and sometimes hundreds of petals, each hand-formed to mimic the appearance of peonies, dahlias, and spiraling succulents. Simply painted in cool shades of blues and greens, the porcelain flowers look as if they were freshly plucked from the garden. You can see more of Mann’s faux flora on his Instagram, and purchase the pieces on his Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

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Wire Mesh Figures of Children Appear to Dissolve into Thin Air 

Norwegian artist Lene Kilde seeks inspiration in the emotions of children, deftly capturing brief moments in their lives distilled into minimalistic wire mesh sculptures. The pieces focus almost entirely on the hands and feet of her subjects that dissolve into nothingness as they go about various activities. This is not to suggest anything is inherently missing, but rather to invite the viewer to complete the rest of each sculpture in their mind, perhaps substituting the missing fragments with their own memories or stories.

Kilde completed a masters degree in product design in 2012 and was subsequently awarded a three-year work scholarship from the Norwegian Arts Council. She is currently represented by Galleri Ramfjord where you can find more of her figurative sculptures.

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Frames Which Frame Themselves by Taylor Holland 

1800s Empire (2014)

1800s Empire (2014), all images via Taylor Holland

Paris-based American artist Taylor Holland explores how technological methods interact with a physical reality, a concept which is showcased in his series FRA[MES]. Utilizing digital methods copied onto custom molds, Holland fills ornate 18th and 19th with reorganized details from their own design, merging the style of art and frame.

Fra[mes] is a collaboration between algorithm, artist, and master craftsman, which not only bridges the gap between digital media and old-world craftsmanship, but gives the computer an equal hand in the creative process,” says Holland in an artist statement on his website.

The series is ongoing, with a previous iteration utilizing frames from the Louvre. You can view more from Holland on his Instagram and Tumblr. (via Colossal Submissions)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

German Neo-Rococo Naturalistic Style (1840-1850) (2014)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

Louis XV Frisbee (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1840 French Neo-Rococo (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1810 Empire (2013)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1840s German Neo-Rococo (2012)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1820 Late Empire (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

1750 Dutch Louis XV (2016)

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