sculpture

Posts tagged
with sculpture



Art

Alarming Juxtapositions of Human and Natural Elements in Sculptures by Kate MacDowell

March 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Portland-based artist Kate MacDowell (previously) continues to construct discomfiting combinations of human and wildlife elements in her porcelain sculptures. She builds each piece by hand, and often layers in details after hollowing out the main form, whether it is a fox’s body encasing a human skull or a human brain filled with flora and fauna.  MacDowell describes her choice of material:

I chose porcelain for its luminous and ghostly qualities as well as its strength and ability to show fine texture.  It highlights both the impermanence and fragility of natural forms in a dying ecosystem, while paradoxically, being a material that can last for thousands of years and is historically associated with high status and value.

The artist’s work is included in a group show at the Everson Museum of Art in Syracuse, NY, which is open through April 15, 2018, and she is also leading a week-long workshop on porcelain sculpting at Idyllwild Arts in California in June 2018. You can see more of her work on her website and Facebook page.

 

 



Art

Ruptured Subway Tiles Reveal Emerging Figures by Graziano Locatelli

February 28, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Self-described “artist and destroyer” Graziano Locatelli has created an inventive take on bas-relief sculpture by building subway tile walls that shatter to reveal human forms. Some works contain subtle shifts and cracks that reveal their portraits, while other sculptures expose more fully-formed figures pushing through the tiles. In his pieces with distinct three dimensional figures, the bodies are cloaked in an anonymizing layer of white “fabric” that erases their faces and blends in with the white tiles. Locatelli shares his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Gargantuan Felt Masks of Beautifully Disturbing Characters by Paolo Del Toro

February 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Paolo Del Toro uses needle felting to create massive masks and sculptures out of wool and foam. His creations depict mythical faces in expressions that range from grotesque grimaces to contemplative introspection; all of his works feature open mouths. While Del Toro’s work is not tied to any particular cultural visual heritage, the shifting personalities of his characters are reminiscent of Japanese Noh theater masks, which are designed to show different emotions from different angles. The artist tells Colossal that viewers describe his work as ugly and beautiful with equal frequency, which is exactly what he hopes for.

I try to find a place in my sculptures that unifies beauty and ugliness. That’s not to say finding somewhere in the middle, but rather finding the place where both coexist at the same time… I hope that by challenging our perspectives, we might look upon one as also the other, and, through that notion, become able to encroach further into the otherness of our dreams and imagination than we might otherwise fear to tread.

Del Toro originally hails from the UK, and began sculpting in 2011 as a hobbyist wood carver. Since settling in the United States in 2015, he has begun to explore larger and more involved work: his most recent felt sculpture is nearly seven feet tall and took four months to complete. The artist currently calls eastern Pennsylvania home, where he is an Adjunct Professor at Pennsylvania College of Art and Design. You can see more of the artist’s work, including his woodcarving, on his website, as well as on Instagram and tumblr. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Textile Bodies Reveal Branched Systems of Veins, Flowers and Roots by Raija Jokinen

February 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Finnish artist Raija Jokinen creates sculptural bodies out of flax which attempt to reveal the complicated relationship between the mind and body. Webs of flowers, veins, and roots cover her textile torsos, shape-shifting between plant and human forms. Jokinen invites the audience to get lost in these visual similarities, as she makes no distinction between whether the pieces are actually nerves or sprouting tree branches.

“It is fascinating how body-related details, such as skin, blood vessels, and nerve tracks resemble the forms of roots or branches, as well as many other organic things,” Jokinen told Colossal. “I am excited in their apparent similarity, infinite variation, and how these visual allegories can be found almost everywhere. These forms are optimal for the life-support functions, and maybe also for our mind.”

Jokinen compares her sculptural practice to painting, using handmade flax rather than paint. An upcoming solo exhibition of her fibrous sculptures opens March 14 at Galleria Uusi Kipinä and runs through April 8. You can see more of her body-based works on her website.

 

 



Craft

Elaborate Paper Origami Tessellations and Kusudamas by Ekaterina Lukasheva

February 21, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Moscow-based paper artist Ekaterina Lukasheva first tried folding paper at the age of 14 when a mathematics professor brought in a book on kusudamas. The traditional paper sphere technique requires an understanding of geometry to ensure the individual units fit together perfectly with the help of glue or string. A few years later she began to explore much more complicated designs like tessellations, aided by a university degree in mathematics and programming. Through her experimentation and commitment Lukasheva has become so proficient with paper that she’s authored several DIY books featuring some of her original designs. You can follow more of her work on Flickr and Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Art Design

Jennifer Crupi’s Unconventional Jewelry Highlights Gesture As Ornament

February 20, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Jennifer Crupi uses carefully constructed jewelry to communicate ideas about psychology, body language, and art history. In her series, Ornamental Hands, Crupi’s structural metal attachments hold the hand in various poses that are commonly found in traditional art historical paintings. Fingers and wrists are suspended in aesthetically pleasing cuffs and splints, which the artist makes by hand using aluminum or sterling silver. Despite the eye-catching nature of Crupi’s anatomical suspensions, the ultimate intention is to display the gesture itself as the ornament, with the jewelry acting as a supportive means to that end. She describes her interest in psychology and how it has informed her work as an artist:

I started investigating body movement and became intrigued in the nuances of non-verbal behavior, posture, and gesture. I then became invested in a whole new kind of movement and for many years now it has been the source of inspiration for my work. Since I began my study into non-verbal communication, I am continually intrigued and surprised by how much we communicate with our bodies.

The Chemintz Museum of Industry in Germany and the Jewelry Museum of Vicenza, Italy both have shows currently on view which include Crupi’s work. The Vincenza exhibit includes four hundred pieces of jewelry in nine themed rooms. You can see more of the artist’s work on her website. Crupi is based in the New York metro area, where she has been a professor at Kean University since 1999.

 

 



Art Photography

New Miniature Post-Apocalyptic Environments by Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber

February 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Lori Nix and Kathleen Gerber (previously) collaboratively produce detailed dioramas caught in the throes of natural or manmade chaos. From 2005 to 2015 the pair created a series titled The City, which imagined the post-apocalyptic interiors of abandoned violin shops, malls, and natural history museums. Empire, a follow-up suite of miniature scenes, serves as a companion to this series by looking at the same imagined future from an exterior point of view.

Nix and Gerber’s new scenes move away from a focus on water-damaged and rusty interiors to explore broad outdoor environments recently devoid of civilization. Scaffolding and bridges crumble as plants begin to poke back through cement cracks, subtle hints that nature has begun to reclaim its land.

Empire presents a world transformed by climate uncertainty and a shifting social order as it stumbles towards a new kind of frontier,” the pair explain in a statement. “These places are eerily beautiful but also unsettling in their stillness and silence. Long ago, man entered the landscape and forced nature to his will. Once grand and emblematic of strength and prosperity, these landscapes now appear abused and in decay, and it is uncertain how they will continue to (d)evolve.”

Each labor intensive model can take up to 7 months to produce, which often means that Nix and Gerber will only finish two photographs a year. The handcrafted dioramas are built from cardboard, foam, and glue—impermanent supplies which are deconstructed and recycled after each shoot.

“I am afraid of what the future holds if we do not change our ways regarding the climate, but I am also fascinated by what a changing world can bring,” Nix told Colossal. “I think this is part of why we make the work we do, to try to reconcile these different attitudes.”

The pair will exhibit images from Empire at their upcoming show at Chicago-based Catherine Edelman Gallery from March 2 to April 28. You can see more of their miniature scenes from both The City and Empire on their Instagram and Facebook.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Animal Multi-Tool