shells

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Art

New Textural Sculptures Made With Swirls of Seashells by Rowan Mersh

February 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Pithváva Praegressus II 2017, H30 X W19 XD17cm, Dentalium Shells

Rowan Mersh (previously) creates textural artworks that toe the line between two and three dimensions, using carefully placed swirls of seashells. Each artwork is made up one only one kind of shell, which the artist uses in multiples as he explores the physical qualities and hidden beauties of the material. Mersh explains his process to Colossal:

On beginning a new project I first make a small sample to understand how best to work with the material, using elements of my chosen material such as size, shape and colour of the material to inform surface pattern. This gives me a guide as to how scale and shape the resulting project. My aim with every project is to expose the true and often hidden beauty of the material I am working with and I feel this is only possible by listening to the material from day one.

The seashells are sourced from sustainable shell farmers and harvesters around the world, and Mersh creates his sculptural pieces in London, where he lives and works. Mersh is represented by Gallery FUMI and currently has new work in the gallery’s winter group show, up until February 24th.

Asabikeshiinh IV, 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh IV (detail), 2017, Sliced Turritella Shells, Fluorocarbon

Pithváva Praegressus I, 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Pithváva Praegressus I (detail), 2017, H40 x W21 x D27.5cm, Dentalium Shells

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V (detail) 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Asabikeshiinh V, 2017, H155 x W137 x D0.07cm, Sliced Doxander Vittatus Shells, Fluorocarbon

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui, 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines 

Echinothrix Imaginem Sui (detail), 2017. H125 x W80 x D27cm, Tiger Sea Urchin Spines

 

 



Art

Porcelain Vessels Inspired by the Ocean Sculpted by Jennifer McCurdy

November 23, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Guided in her ceramics studio by nature’s symmetrical and asymmetrical forms, artist Jennifer McCurdy works with inspiration from everyday objects, producing vessels that imitate natural specimens such as malformed conch shells and burst milkweed pods. Her sculptures are habitually one color, a white the same shade as the ocean’s surf. Keeping a very limited palette allows McCurdy to highlight the hollow areas of her pieces, casting shadows from her chiseled patterns.

“I use a translucent porcelain body because it has a beautiful surface, and it conveys the qualities of light and shadow that I wish to express,” said McCurdy in her artist statement. “After throwing my vessel on the potter’s wheel, I alter the form to set up a movement of soft shadow. When the porcelain is leather hard, I carve patterns to add energy and counterpoint. I fire my work to cone 10, where the porcelain becomes non-porous and translucent.”

McCurdy occasionally adds 23 carat gold leaf detail to the inside of her pieces, allowing them to glow from the inside. You can see more of her ocean-inspired vessels on her website, as well as within the pages of the book The New Age of Ceramics currently available in the Colossal Shop.

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Art

Undulating Shell Sculptures by Rowan Mersh

June 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Turritella Duplicata II, 2015. Turritella duplicata shells.

London-based artist Rowan Mersh assembles dense rolling surfaces comprised of thousands of seashells, tiny solid objects that now appear like fluid waves. Mimicking the natural geometric patterns found in life, the artist uses responsibly sourced shells like windowpane oyster discs or duplicata shells that are tightly arranged in a labor-intensive process, one piece at a time. The shell artworks are just a small portion of Mersh’s artist practice that also spans fashion design, textile sculptures, and interactive installations. He exhibits internationally with Gallery FUMI where you can see much more of his recent works. (thnx, Laura!)

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Turritella Duplicata II, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, 2015. Windowpane oyster shell discs.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Placuna Phoenix IV, detail.

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Pithvava Male, 2013. Dentalium shells.

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Pithvava Male, detail.

 

 



Craft Design

Air Plant Jellyfish by ‘PetitBeast’

January 27, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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LA-based designer and art director Cathy Van Hoang had the novel idea of using sea urchin shells as upside down planters for air plants to create little aerial jellyfish. She sells them in her Etsy shop, PetitBeast. (via Steampunk Tendencies)

 

 



Art

Mother of Pearl Shell Skull Carvings by Gregory Halili

June 2, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Born and raised in the Philippines, New Jersey-based artist Gregory Halili is deeply influenced by the vegetation and wildlife he experienced as a child. His latest series of work involves a fusion of the human form with the natural world in these amazing bas-relief shell skulls. Halili carves and then paints with oil on raw, gold-lip and black-lip mother of pearl found in shells collected from the Philippines. The pieces will soon be exhibited at Silverlens Galleries in Manila and Nancy Hoffman Gallery in NYC, but for now you can see much more in this Facebook gallery. (via Junk Culture, Skullspiration)

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Art Design

Translucent Hermit Shell Crabs Adorned with Architectural Cityscapes by Aki Inomata

July 26, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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NYC / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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NYC / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Ksar of Ait-Ben-Haddou / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Bangkok / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Zaanse Schans / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Zaanse Schans / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Tokyo / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Santorini / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Honfleur / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

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Installation view at Ai Kowada Gallery / © Aki Inomata courtesy of Ai Kowada Gallery

Created in 2009 by Japanese artist Aki Inomata, these fantastic little cityscapes atop hermit crab shells were part of a body of work titled “Why not hand over a shelter to hermit crabs?.” Keeping the welfare of the animal in mind, Inomata studied the needs of the hermit crab to select a compatible shell and used a CT scanner to image the interior of sea shells so she could adapt her own miniature sculptures into suitable homes. The small buildings and skylines were then designed atop the plastic shell forms to mimic the architecture of various cities including New York, Tokyo, Bangkok and elsewhere.

As hermit crabs outgrow their shells it becomes necessary to find a new, larger home. With this project Inomata hoped to draw a parallel to our own need as humans to migrate or find shelter in a new city. Photographs of the final works were on display at Ai Kowada Gallery. (via designboom)