Tag Archives: shopping

Rogue Installations of Similarly Colored Objects Inside Big-Box Stores by Carson Davis Brown 

Using found objects collected from within big-box stores, artist Carson Davis Brown creates color-specific installations for his photography series Mass. The works are organized conglomerations of basketballs, laundry baskets, wrapping paper, and other mass produced goods, each arranged by color within the stores they are found. After photographing the works they are left as is, experienced by passersby as a break from the monotony of the weekly grocery store run and eventually disassembled by the store’s staff. You can see more of Brown’s assembled consumer experiments on Instagram and his project’s website massproject.biz. (via Juxtapoz, Catherine Edelman Gallery)

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A 150-Year-Old Porcelain Warehouse in Japan Opens for Daily ‘Treasure Hunts’ for Just $45 

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The Kouraku Kiln was founded in Arita (Saga Prefecture, Japan) in 1865 and has been producing ceramics for the past 150 years. Over that time the facility has accumulated a vast collection of pottery that has, for one reason or another, gone unsold. The warehouse is so vast that some workers use a bicycle to get from one side to the other. And they’ll be the first to admit that even they don’t really know what’s in there. The production facility is now inviting visitors on a “treasure hunt” to try and get rid of some of their stock.

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Here’s how the treasure hunt works:

— Make your reservation by phone (they only allow 10 people per day)
— Show up at your designated time and select your course and pay: 5,000 yen or 10,000 yen (about $45 to $90)
— Get a 30-min tour of the facility
— Begin your 90-min treasure hunt. You’ll be given a pair of gloves, a flashlight and a basket. You can take home everything you fit in your basket.
— The more expensive course gives you access to a special section of decoratively painted ceramics but both allow you to take home as much as you can fit in your basket. Once done you’ll get to wrap everything up in newspaper so that nothing breaks on your way home.

It sounds like a really fun excursion! They even have an English-speaking staff on hand to assist foreigners.

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(Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

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A New Japanese Painting Supply Store Lines its Walls With 4,200 Different Pigments 

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Thousands of pigments fill glass vials below the slatted wood ceilings of the new concept Pigment, an art supply laboratory and store that just opened in Tokyo by company Warehouse TERRADA. The store design was created by architect Kengo Kuma, utilizing bamboo and large open spaces to create a sense of unity with the outdoors and spark the imagination of those who enter.

In recent years fewer artists have turned to more traditional methods of art making, diminishing the number of successors to these older forms. Pigment aims to provide hard-to-find tools for the preservation of older paintings while also inspiring the latest generation of artists to incorporate these older materials into newer works. In addition to selling brushes, pigments, special glues, and papers (some used in Japanese painting since the Meiji period), the store will also provide workshops by both art professors and manufacturers of the supplies housed in-store.

If you can’t make it to Japan to experience the space in person, you can browse Pigment’s large supply of pigments and rare materials on their online store here. (via Designboom)

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Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand-Stitched Felt Products 

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British artist Lucy Sparrow has converted an entire abandoned corner shop in Bethnal Green, east London, into a temporary art exhibition titled The Corner Shop featuring 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Chips, magazines, candy, frozen dinners, and even the cash register have been faithfully rendered in fabric, a process that took Sparrow about seven months to complete and began with a successful plea for help on Kickstarter. The shop is open to visitors every day this month, and almost all of the items are available for purchase online. (via My Modern Met, Laughing Squid, The Jealous Curator)

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Absolute Sellout 

Absolute Sellout is a collaborative art and design project between Joshua Robin Kaplan and Benjamin Niznik that resulted in these beautifully packaged generic consumer goods that are now for sale online as limited editions.

Absolute Sellout displays a collection of consumer goods and mundane human artifacts in a minimalist gallery context. Each collection is composed of unique and often overlooked objects from the past, present, and future. Their graphic style is the intersection of ‘nostalgic futurism’ and ‘truckstop modernism’. It is the pasts idea of the future. It is both familiar and abstract. […] The re-branded items were designed as part of an exhibit entitled “Class Projects” at Partners & Spade in NYC in September of 2010. The appeal of generically branded items is that they are simultaneously modest and presumptuous. There is a charming impression of innocent idealism in the concept of a ‘Soap’ branded bar of soap.

I wish we lived in a world where all goods could be packaged as simply as this.

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