slow motion

Posts tagged
with slow motion



Design

A Picture Frame Powered by Strobe Lights Turns Everyday Objects into Slow Motion Sculptures

August 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

AudienceLove

For over 15 years, scientist and artist Jeff Lieberman has been fascinated by how objects move in slow motion since first mastering high-speed photography at MIT. His experiments eventually landed him a hosting gig at Discovery’s Time Warp where he uses high speed cameras to explore a variety of everyday occurrences in slow motion. Two years ago Lieberman began to wonder if there might be a way to bring the optical illusion of slow motion imagery into the real world. What if you could see a slow motion object up close and practically reach out and touch it? The result is Slow Dance, a tiny environment that appears to slow down time.

Slow Dance is a picture frame that makes use of strobe lights to turn any object you place inside of it appear to move in slow motion. Lieberman shares:

Strobe lights are nothing new. From the photos of Eadweard Muybridge to the photos of Doc Edgerton, extremely fast strobe lights have been helping us to see into fast motions. On a dancefloor, strobe lights turn us into stop motion animations. But we’ve put strobe light to use in a different fashion.

By using high speed strobe lights blinking 80 times a second, your eyes cannot even see that they are blinking — the light looks continuous. By synchronizing the strobes to the high-speed vibration of objects (feathers, branches, flowers, etc), we create the visual illusion of those objects moving in slow motion. This is a phenomenon called persistence of vision, and works similarly to the way a TV works — by flickering frozen images quickly enough that we perceive them as continuous motion.

Slow Dance just went up on Kickstarter and appears to have funded almost instantly. You can see more photos and videos about how it works here.

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Animation Art Dance

The Physics of Kung Fu Brought to Life Through Motion Capture Visualizations

May 2, 2016

Christopher Jobson

We’ve all seen exaggerated depictions of kung fu in movies or maybe a demonstration by a practitioner in real life, but German digital artist Tobias Gremmler decided to portray the Chinese martial art in an entirely new light through the use of motion capture. By capturing the motion of different sequences Gremmler is able to distill the data into these animated sculptures, effectively turning movement into structure and volume. The motion of limbs is turned into a complex moving scaffold or interpreted as dramatic bursts of particles, the visuals used to seemingly isolate the physics of kung fu. If you enjoyed this also check out films like Asphyxia, Walking City, and these similar idents for CCTV. (via The Creator’s Project, Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Amazing Science

A Tornado of Fire Filmed in Slow Motion

November 23, 2015

Christopher Jobson

Gav and Dan over at the Slow Mo Guys are famous for creating bizarre (and usually explosive) events in front of powerful HD slow motion cameras. Almost all of their videos are worth a watch, but their latest involving a spinning tornado of fire is especially great, skip ahead to 1:25 for the good stuff. Although this particular flamey vortex was created artificially using box fans, you can sometimes see real fire tornadoes in the middle of forest fires or spinning off from the plumes near an active volcano.

 

 



Amazing Science

Remarkable Footage of Plants That Explode to Disperse Their Seeds

June 12, 2015

Christopher Jobson

The Smithsonian Channel just shared this brief new clip of three plant species that use different methods of propulsion to spread their seeds. The filmmakers captured slow motion footage of violets, touch me nots, and poisonous squirting cucumbers (!) as they explode in some pretty incredible ways. (via Boing Boing, The Kid Should See This)

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Music

Unconditional Rebel: A 3.5-Minute Music Video Shot in Just 5 Seconds with a High Speed Camera

February 12, 2015

Johnny Strategy

One day in mid-Autumn of last year, 80 extras lined up along a dirt road in an industrial area in France. A car drove by at 50 km/h (about 31 mph) and filmed them engaging in various activities – everything from lighting up a barbecue grill and cutting a metal shopping cart to playing the cymbals and talking on the phone. The action was over, quite literally, in 5 seconds. French filmmaker Guillaume Panariello describes it as “the shortest shooting ever.” But it’s when the footage is slowed down that the magic happens.

The footage was filmed at an incredibly high rate of 1000 frames/second. Once it’s put to slow motion, what happened in 5 seconds unfolds into a 3.5-minute “dreamlike mural.” There were some digital elements later added in the editing room but for the most part this is a single, 5-second shot. It was put to the song “Unconditional Rebel” by French musician Siska. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Amazing

Members of the Washington Ballet Demonstrate their Most Difficult Dance Moves in Slow Motion

May 23, 2014

Christopher Jobson

dance

In this video from the Washington Post, several members of the Washington Ballet demonstrate their most challenging moves. The points of peak action were shot with a high speed camera resulting in some impressive slow motion footage as each dancer seems to completely defy physics. (via Laughing Squid, The Kid Should See This)

 

 



Art

Stainless: Hypnotizing Slow-Motion Footage from Trains Pulling into Stations

January 16, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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These videos by Adam Magyar are one of those things that are difficult to explain verbally, but as soon as you see it, you realize how completely amazing it is. Filmed in Tokyo, New York and Berlin, Magyar positioned himself on trains as they pulled into subway stops, filming the waiting crowds at 50 frames per second using a high speed camera. The resulting footage creates an uncanny feeling as the train is clearly moving quickly through the station, but the people seem to remain motionless. Any of these scenes wouldn’t seem out of place in a Ron Fricke film. To learn more about how Magyar filmed them, head on over to PetaPixel. (via The Fox is Black)

Update: There’s another great piece about Magyar’s work over on Medium.