Tag Archives: space

Discover What the Solar System Looked Like on the Exact Day of Your Birth 

The solar system is in constant rotation, a notion that has taken us generations to understand, and just as long to track. This knowledge has impacted our understanding of time, mathematics, science, and religion, yet the universe is still one of our greatest mysteries. SpaceTime Coordinates brings a personalized depiction to the great expanse of space by calculating the exact position of the planets on the day of your birth.

Using NASA data and algorithms, the company computes the positions of the planets and dwarf planets to create custom prints that correspond with your unique position in the universe. No two dates provide the same planetary map.

“On any given date, the Solar System was organized in a singularly unique way – differently than any other day in history,” says founders govy and Martin Vézina. “Our mission is to provide you with the actual snapshot of the Solar System that corresponds to your most special day.”

Previously the company has created 3D-printed mementos cast in metal that display your planetary information. Now, the company has created minimal posters in dark blue, black, and white, and is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter as part of the website’s Projects of Earth series. You can view more samples of SpaceTime Coordinates’ designs on their website.

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A Panoramic Full Eclipse Composite with Star Trails Captured by Stephane Vetter 

Photograph © Stephane Vetter

In this beautifully rendered “little planet” image, photographer Stephane Vetter fuses both night and day captured from a single location at Magone Lake in Oregon during the August 21st solar eclipse. The shot required tons of careful planning, and here’s an explanation of how he did it via Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This featured little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse, digitally-fused composite captured celestial action during both night and day from a single location. In this 360×180 panorama, north and south are at the image bottom and top, while east and west are at the left and right edges, respectively. During four hours the night before the eclipse, star trails were captured circling the north celestial pole (bottom) as the Earth spun. During the day of the total eclipse, the Sun was captured every fifteen minutes from sunrise to sunset (top), sometimes in partial eclipse. All of these images were then digitally merged onto a single image taken exactly during the total solar eclipse. Then, the Sun’s bright corona could be seen flaring around the dark new Moon (upper left), while Venus simultaneously became easily visible (top). The tree in the middle, below the camera, is a Douglas fir.

So, just your typical full eclipse, little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse photo by a fir tree, really. You can see more of Vetter’s photography on his website.

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Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh 

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. Just make sure you’re prepared.

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New ‘Eco-Surrealist’ Paintings by Josh Keyes Observe a Post-Human World 

Josh Keyes (previously) paints scenes that observe the world at the brink of destruction. His works often focus on polar bears and sharks, one species which will soon lose its home as ice shelves continue to melt, and the other which is poised to take over an Earth undersea. The animals are placed in settings that suggest a post-human existence, such as a pair of fighting horses in front of a beached ship and a solitary brown bear looking over a seemingly empty metropolis.

The hyperrealistic paintings also incorporate graffiti found in unlikely places. Tags cover satellites, icebergs, and even a shark, an allusion to the lengths at which humans are willing to leave their mark.

Keyes’ solo exhibition, Implosion, opens August 5th at Thinkspace Gallery in LA and runs through August 26, 2017. You can see more of his works on his Instagram and website. (via Juxtapoz, Arrested Motion)

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Still Photos of Jupiter Taken by the Juno Spacecraft Set in Motion by Sean Doran 

NASA’s Juno spacecraft launched in 2011, arriving at Jupiter in July of 2016 to begin a series of what will eventually be 12 orbits around the Solar System’s largest planet. The path selected for this particular mission is a wide polar orbit, most of which is spent well away from Jupiter. But once every 53 days Juno screams from top to bottom across the surface of the gaseous planet, recording data and snapping photographs for two hours. It takes around 1.5 days to download the six megabytes of data collected during the transit.

Juno only takes a handful of still photographs each time it passes Jupiter, all of which are made available to the public. Lucky for us Sean Doran stitched together the images from Juno’s last transit (colorized by Gerald Eichstädt) to create an approximate video/animation of what it looks like to fly over the giant planet. Music added by Avi Solomon.

Update: There’s now an extended version.

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Meet the Milky Way: A Timelapse Video Shot From the Cockpit of a Swiss Airliner 

Sales Wick is an airline pilot, photographer, and film producer based in Switzerland who photographs the journeys of his many international flights on his website BeyondClouds. For his video Meet the Milky Way, Wick created a timelapse of his nighttime trip from Zurich to Sao Paulo, capturing the starry sky and the glowing Milky Way straight ahead. The video was recorded in August during one of the few nights where shooting stars can be seen racing across the sky, and during the video several can be observed traveling across the screen.

You can view more of Wick’s adventures in aviation on his Instagram and Vimeo, or if you a want different perspective of the Milky Way, check out the timelapse video shot recently in Hawaii by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic from SKYGLOW. (via Kottke)

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