Posts tagged
with stars


Stippled Black and White Illustrations of Star-Packed Galaxies by Petra Kostova

February 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Copenhagen-based graphic designer and illustrator Petra Kostova of Pet & Dot creates dazzling galaxies composed of millions of stippled dots. To produce her concentrated star systems and cloudy nebulas she uses technical pens (either rOtring Rapidograph or Isograph) to draw on black and white paper. Due to the limitations of her color scheme, each work is completely formed through the intensity of her chosen dots—a meditative process which can often take her several weeks or months to complete.

Kostova also produces handmade prints created by a technique called Photogravure, which accurately reproduces her stippled detail. You can find these, and her original drawings, on her website and Instagram.




The Night Skies Over Finland & Iceland Saturated with Stars Photographed by Mikko Lagerstedt

September 14, 2017

Christopher Jobson

We’ve long been drawn to self-taught photographer Mikko Lagerstedt’s (previously) dreamy composite photos of Finland and Iceland at night. In his long-exposure images, meteors are seen streaking through the sky and frigid waterfalls appear like mist. Lagerstedt composes and edits all of his images in Lightroom and Photoshop and shares numerous tutorials on his techniques through his website. He most recently returned from a photoshoot at a deserted Yyteri Beach in Finland, more of which he shared on Instagram.




A Panoramic Full Eclipse Composite with Star Trails Captured by Stephane Vetter

August 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photograph © Stephane Vetter

In this beautifully rendered “little planet” image, photographer Stephane Vetter fuses both night and day captured from a single location at Magone Lake in Oregon during the August 21st solar eclipse. The shot required tons of careful planning, and here’s an explanation of how he did it via Astronomy Picture of the Day:

This featured little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse, digitally-fused composite captured celestial action during both night and day from a single location. In this 360×180 panorama, north and south are at the image bottom and top, while east and west are at the left and right edges, respectively. During four hours the night before the eclipse, star trails were captured circling the north celestial pole (bottom) as the Earth spun. During the day of the total eclipse, the Sun was captured every fifteen minutes from sunrise to sunset (top), sometimes in partial eclipse. All of these images were then digitally merged onto a single image taken exactly during the total solar eclipse. Then, the Sun’s bright corona could be seen flaring around the dark new Moon (upper left), while Venus simultaneously became easily visible (top). The tree in the middle, below the camera, is a Douglas fir.

So, just your typical full eclipse, little-planet, all-sky, double time-lapse photo by a fir tree, really. You can see more of Vetter’s photography on his website.



Art Science

Meet the Milky Way: A Timelapse Video Shot From the Cockpit of a Swiss Airliner

May 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Sales Wick is an airline pilot, photographer, and film producer based in Switzerland who photographs the journeys of his many international flights on his website BeyondClouds. For his video Meet the Milky Way, Wick created a timelapse of his nighttime trip from Zurich to Sao Paulo, capturing the starry sky and the glowing Milky Way straight ahead. The video was recorded in August during one of the few nights where shooting stars can be seen racing across the sky, and during the video several can be observed traveling across the screen.

You can view more of Wick’s adventures in aviation on his Instagram and Vimeo, or if you a want different perspective of the Milky Way, check out the timelapse video shot recently in Hawaii by Gavin Heffernan and Harun Mehmedinovic from SKYGLOW. (via Kottke)



Amazing Photography

An Amazing Split View of the Milky Way as If Photographed from Beneath a Frigid German River

January 31, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Johannes Holzer / Caters News Agency

Last October, photographer Johannes Holzer braved the winter cold to setup a series of long-exposure shots along the the Isar, a river in Southern Germany. To accomplish the eye-popping view of the Milky Way, a mountainous landscape, and the murky depths of the river he relied on two cameras to shoot three photos from roughly the same perspective, stitched together here in a final image. Holzer says the photo “was done with two cameras, [the] sky with a Sony A7r and Vixen Polarie Startracker, one additional shot for the landscape without [a] Startracker, [and] underwater was done with a Canon 5Dm2 with an EWA Underwater case.”

Holzer specializes in Milky Way photography and landscapes, you can see much more of his work on Karwendelbilder. (via Reddit)




The Milky Way Reflected Onto the Largest Salt Flat in the World

August 4, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski


All images via Daniel Kordan

Determined to find a destination where he could photograph a completely dark sky, Russian photographer Daniel Kordan traveled to the Altiplano region of west-central South America, an area known for its absolute darkness, and which rises 12,300 feet above sea level. While here, Kordan captured the Uyuni salt flat with a special astrophotography camera. This type of camera unlocks the colors found in the sky, opening up the barriers between earth and space and casting the Milky Way onto the reflective flats.

Kordan’s next voyage is to the Faroe Islands and Greenland to lead several photography workshops and explorations. You can see more of his photography on Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)







Amazing Photography

Incredible Long-Exposure Photo of the Milky Way Above Mont Saint-Michel Island

February 18, 2016

Christopher Jobson


Photo by Loïc Lagarde

Last week while visiting Le Mont-Saint-Michel in Normandy, photographer Loïc Lagarde captured this awesome view of the tidal island at night with the Milky Way spanning the sky above, further highlighting the near fairy-tale nature of the historic landmark. The island has held strategic fortifications since the 8th century and is famous for the dramatic shift in surrounding tides that vary roughly 14 metres (46 ft) between high and low and high water marks. Despite being visited by nearly 3 million people annually the island has a population of just 44 permanent residents. Lagarde says the photo was made without multiple exposures or blending and is a ‘true’ representation of the moment. You can see more of his photos on Instagram.