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Art

Hollow Figurative Sculptures by Park Ki Pyung

March 24, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean sculptor Park Ki Pyung creates hollow human works from resin and steel, pieces that appear to express an extreme melancholia with bowed heads and resigned body language. The life-size sculptures are held upright with rebar, and are built to reflect Pyung’s deep existential musings. By stripping the figures’ cores he points towards his own inner turmoil, presenting figurative shells, rather than completed human forms. You can view more of his hollow steel sculptures on his Instagram. (via iGNANT)

 

 



Art

Monumental Splashes of Stainless Steel Calligraphy by Zheng Lu

October 5, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Water Dripping – Splashing, 2014. Sundaram Tagore Gallery

Chinese artist Zheng Lu has long been fascinated by the properties of water, from its amorphous shape when flying through the air to the quality of light that glints across its surface. Lu also grew up in a literary family where the art of Chinese calligraphy played a meaningful role in his upbringing. In his large-scale stainless steel sculptures, the artist merges the two unrelated interests to create gravity-defying waves of calligraphy that twist and splash dramatically through the air.

To make each artwork Lu begins with with a plaster base to which he gradually adheres thousands of laser-cut Chinese characters. The final pieces can sit either freestanding on a pedestal or installed as numerous suspended parts that are linked in space to fill an entire gallery.

One of Lu’s largest sculptures from his water series is currently on view at Sundram Tagore Gallery in New York through October 10th, and you can see more of his work on Artsy and at Fabien Fryns Fine Art.

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Sundaram Tagore Gallery

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Water in Dripping No.7, 2013. Fabien Fryns Fine Art

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Sundaram Tagore Gallery

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Sundaram Tagore Gallery

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Sundaram Tagore Gallery

 

 



Art

An Ornate Truck Spot-Welded from Thousands of Reflective Steel Disks by Valay Shende

March 10, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Transit is a 2010 sculpture by Mumbai-based artist Valay Shende depicting a life-size work truck that carries figures of 22 people. Created over a period of 18 months, the piece was constructed from thousands of reflective stainless steel disks that have been individually spot welded together. Shende conceived of Transit as commentary on a dramatic rash of farmer sucides in India over the last decade. The truck’s rearview mirrors display video footage of roadways in London, Mumbai and Dubai, as if the vehicle is moving from the perspective of the driver’s seat but in reality it remains stationary. Transit is currently on view at the Mumbai City Museum, and you can read more about it on Indian Express. Images courtesy Sakshi Gallery. (via Jeremy Mayer)

 

 



Art

Bolt Poetry: A Blacksmith Evokes Surprisingly Human Forms from Single Steel Bolts

March 7, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Oslo-based blacksmith and photographer Tobbe Malm manages to create unusually emotional sculptures using old bolts. The series began when Malm stumbled onto the rusting bolts at a barn in Bergsladen, Sweden. He immediately recognized the wide caps and slender stems as having humanistic qualities so he gathered them up and proceeded to heat, forge, twist and bend them into shape in his studio. The resulting collection of sculptures titled Bolt Poetry, evokes humanistic moments of affection, sadness, and pain. You can see more of his work on Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Steel Animal Sculptures by Byeong Doo Moon at ‘Sculpture by the Sea’

October 30, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by GCImagery.

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Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by Deepwarren.

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Our memory in your place. 2014. Photo by Deepwarren.

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I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

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I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

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I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011.

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I have been dreaming to be a tree. 2011. Photo by Francisco Martins.

South Korean sculptor Byeong Doo Moon unveiled a new stainless steel sculpture as part of Sculpture by the Sea 2014 earlier this month in Sydney. The intricately welded peacock is titled “Our memory in your place” and is a stylistic companion to Moon’s 2011 sculpture, a deer with an unwieldy set of antlers that resembles tree limbs. The annual sculpture event is now in its 18th year and runs through November 9th. You can see plenty more photos of this year’s participants on their website. (via Visual News)

 

 



Art

Figurative Sculptures Welded from Steel Scraps by Jordi Diez Fernandez

February 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Monument a Ildefons Cerda

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Barcelona-based sculptor Jordi Diez Fernandez works pimarily with welded steel fragments to create monumental human forms. His most recent piece is a tribute to civil engineer Ildefons Cerdà (top) who was largely responsible for designing the 19th-century extension of Barcelona called the Eixample, a memorial now on view in the municipality of Centelles. You can see much more of Fernandez’s work on his website and over on Behance.

 

 



Art

Perceiving the Flow: Human Figures Composed of Unraveling Stainless Steel Ribbons by Gil Bruvel

May 29, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Though cast from bands of stainless steel ribbons, these figurative sculptures by Texas-based artist Gil Bruvel seem more fluid than solid, as if the wind could simply blow them apart. The works above are all part of the artist’s Flow series that he says are meant to reveal “an essential underlying fluidity that exists simultaneously within the physical, quantum, and metaphoric realms.” Bruvel was born in Sydney, Australia, in 1959 and he began learning the basics of sculpting at the age of nine before embarking on an artist career that now spans nearly 40 years. If you’re in San Francisco next month you can catch Bruvel’s work at Chloe Gallery starting June 30th, and you can see plenty more right here.