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Art

Bordalo II Opens the Doors to ‘Attero,’ a Giant Exhibition of Animal Assemblages Built with Trash

November 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Within the confines of an abandoned warehouse in Lisbon, artist Bordalo II just opened the doors to his largest body of work to date, dozens of animalistic assemblages comprised of his trademark medium: trash. Using locally-sourced waste plastics, car parts, construction materials, and other found detritus, Bordalo has become famous for his uncanny depictions of animals—those most vulnerable to the side effects of our disposable economy. While scale often plays a large role in his outdoor wall-mounted street pieces, the artist also created considerably smaller assemblages attached to old doors, siding, and windowpanes.

“Whether on a large or small scale, his unusual sculptural creations oblige us to question and rethink our own role as actors in this static, consumerist and self-destructive society, which exploits, often in an abusive way, the resources that nature offers us,” shares Attero curator Lara Seixo Rodrigues.

With well over 8,000 visitors in its first week, Attero (Latin for waste) opened on November 4, 2017 and runs through November 26. You can see many more photos on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Swarms of Hybrid Creatures Flow Like Liquid on Walls and Buildings by Pantónio

November 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Herds of serpentine rabbits, schools of fish, and flocks of interwoven birds all feature prominently in these recent murals by Portuguese artist Pantónio. Many of the pieces seem to be swirling through water or comprised of liquid itself, often taking inspiration from creatures found in the Tagus river that flows through the middle of Portugal. Seen here are a collection of murals from Pantónio’s travels to Sweden, Morocco, Florida, and elsewhere. You can follow more of his work on Facebook.

 

 



Art

An Oakland-Based Graffiti Camp That’s Just For Girls

November 8, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist, muralist, printmaker, and educator Nina Wright, also known as Girl Mobb, started creating graffiti as a teenager in her hometown in rural Ohio. She found a community of street artists when she moved to Oakland, CA, but struggled to find a segment of women making similar work. Each time she was curated into an all-woman exhibition, the same 5-6 artists were also selected. This lack of female presence prompted Wright to start a mentorship program, an attempt to increase the number of female artists creating street art in the Bay Area.

Wright hosted her first session of Graffiti Camp for Girls in April of this year. The camp was created for young women ages 12-17, and is based on a sliding-scale tuition. Participants learn how to properly use aerosol paints, take the requisite safety precautions, and efficiently collaborate. At the end of each session a large-scale mural is planned, designed, and organized by the young women themselves.

Each of Wright’s four sessions has filled up quickly, and she’s been asked to extend the camp to cities that lay outside of the Bay Area. The street artist hopes that with a growing base of volunteer mentors the program will help to correct the gender imbalance seen in Oakland’s street art scene and beyond. You can keep updated about future sessions of Graffiti Camp for Girls on the program’s website, and view more of the work made by Wright and camp participants on her Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



Art Design

A 3D Zebra Stripe Crosswalk Appears in Iceland

October 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos by Gusti Productions

The quiet fishing town of Ísafjörður, Iceland now has one of the snazzier pedestrian crosswalks you’re likely to encounter: a traditional set of white zebra-stripes painted to appear three dimensional. The piece was created last month as part of a collaboration between street painting firm Vegi GÍH and the city’s environmental commissioner Ralf Trylla. The city hopes the piece serves both as an artwork and as a stronger visual cue that convinces motorists to slow at the crosswalk. See more in Iceland Magazine. (via Jeroen Apers, Swissmiss)

 

 



Art

Butterfly Specimen Boxes Painted as Multi-Story Murals by Mantra

October 18, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Wiener Schmetterlinge, 2017. Wien, Austria.

France-based street artist Mantra has been unveiling a series of trompe l’oeil murals that convert the facades of commercial and residential buildings into larger-than-life butterfly display cases in Spain, Austria, France, and Bogota. Seen here are a few pieces from the last year, but you can explore a bit more on Facebook.
(via Lustik)

El asalto de Apollo, 2017. Saragosse, Spain.

Mariposas de Aragón, 2017. Festival Internacional de Arte Urbano. Photo by Juanjo Fernandez.

Mariposas de Aragón, progress.

Yasuni’s Imago, 2017. Thionville, France.

Bogota, 2015.

Collaboration with Stinkfish. Vienna, Austria.

 

 



Design

Yellow Street Lines Form a Park Bench Around a Tree in this Temporary Green Space by The Edible Bus Stop

October 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of the 2012 RHS Hampton Court Palace Flower Show in London, landscape and design consultancy The Edible Bus Stop conceived of a green space that incorporated gardens, artwork, and the conversion of a street into public space. The temporary exhibition titled Riot of Color was conceived as “a post apocalyptic interpretation of the after effects of the 2011 London riots.” One of the more novel aspects was this fun park bench designed as yellow street lines that rise from pavement to wrap around a tree. You can see more views on their website. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Art

Basketball Courts Transformed Into Large-Scale Artworks by Project Backboard

October 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Project Backboard began in 2014 when Daniel Peterson, a former college basketball player and employee of the Memphis Grizzlies, noticed the neglected state of several basketball courts scattered around the city. To revive these spaces, Peterson began to refurbish the courts with small improvements—filling in cracks or repainting the basic lines needed for a regulation game.

As Peterson began updating courts across Memphis, his interest widened to include ways he could not only improve his local courts, but generate excitement in surrounding neighborhoods for their public parks. After learning local artist Anthony Lee was already designing an installation for a nearby court, he partnered with the artist to paint the park’s gray asphalt with bright blue and pink designs. The collaboration marked the beginning of Project Backboard, while also inspiring Peterson work with local artists who were already engaged within a chosen community.

“I prefer to work with artists who have a connection to the park or city where we are working,” Peterson told Colossal. “Having the artist on site is very helpful for installation and, especially if it is a city I am not as familiar with, a local artist can create a work with more meaning and context. That said, there are artists I have worked with in the past that I would love to work with again if the right opportunity comes along!”

After reviving several basketball courts in Memphis, Project Backboard has moved on to produce projects in St. Louis and Los Angeles. Currently the organization is working with cities along the East Coast, specifically Baltimore and New Rochelle, New York. To explore other updated courts, and how you might be able to collaborate on an installation in your own city, visit Project Blackboard’s website or Instagram. (via Artsy and the National Endowment for the Arts)

 

 

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