Tag Archives: street art

Urban Diversion: Playful Street Art Interventions on the Streets of France by OakOak

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Street artist OakOak (previously) continues to bring smiles and double-takes to his hometown of St. Etienne, France, an old industrial town with drab facades and cracked sidewalks ripe for his unique brand of visual jokes. He shares his love for superheroes, the Simpsons, Bruce Lee, and other pop culture references through mostly non-destructive, temporary interventions that interact with the immediate environment. Some of OakOak’s best works have been gathered into a new book, Urban Diversion (in French), and the artist had an exhibition earlier this year at le cabinet d’amateur earlier this year.

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Repurposed Wood Doors and Furniture Transformed into Geometric Faces on the Streets of Belgium

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Over the last year, Belgian painter and sculpturor Stefaan De Croock aka Strook (previously) began working with repurposed wood panels, doors, and furniture to construct giant faces on the side of buildings. The recycled wood surfaces are cut into precise geometric shapes and pieced together like a tangram puzzle, leaving the original paint and textures untouched. His most recent piece, Elsewhere, was a collaboration with his 69-year-old dad for Mechelen Muurt. You can see more of Strook’s paintings, sculptures, and other artworks on his website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Towering New Pigeon Murals by ‘Super A’

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Ah yes, the majestic pigeon. An unlikely source of inspiration for such dominating murals, but at the hands of Dutch street artist Stefan Thelen aka Super A (previously) these ubiquitous urban dwellers are turned into something surprisingly beautiful. His latest piece at top was just completed for Mural Goes in Goes, Netherlands. Check out more of his paintings and other works on his website. (via StreetArtNews)

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Quirky Monsters Playfully Occupy Abandoned Berlin Warehouses

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German street artist Kim Köster is doing the impossible—turning the typically scary content of monsters and abandoned buildings into interactive entertainment for children. Köster started by spray painting mischievous monsters in derelict warehouse sites outside of Berlin, allowing them to playfully interact with the surrounding architecture. Köster is now turning these works into an interactive children’s picture book called Monzter that gives kids a chance to play with these colorful creatures without having to wander into any creepy buildings.

The app invites the audience to reflect and laugh with the philosophical musings of children like, “Are ghosts able to see me?” and “How big is the sun?” The app is iPad compatible and available in the Apple app store.

Köster was born and raised in the North German village of Worpswede. Originally experimenting with drawing and watercolor, Köster moved into the graffiti scene. Like Monzter, he often employs new media within his work allowing for a wide public accessibility of his pieces. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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Playful New Murals and Paintings by ‘Wes21′ Fuse Technology, Humor, and the Natural World

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With a keen sense of humor and superb control of a spray can, Swiss artist Remo Lienhard (aka Wes21) covers both walls and canvases with his playful sythesis of science fiction and the natural world. The artist imagines a hybrid spaceship ladybug as it blasts into the sky and pair of airborne lighthouses are revealed to be the bodies of ominous looking squid. Lienhard works in a variety of mediums from smaller acrylic and spray pieces on canvas to larger murals that often make use of surrounding objects.

Lienhard is a member of a collective of graffiti artists and illustrators called Schwarzmaler and is represented by SOON, and you can see more recent work on his Facebook.

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Javier De Riba Spray Paints the Floors of Derelict Buildings With Geometric, Tile-Like Patterns

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Javier de Riba spray paints abandoned buildings, but not in the way you might imagine. Instead of working on the interior or exterior walls of the buildings he finds, de Riba spray paints the floors, mapping out bright geometric patterns both large and small. The patterns de Riba creates look exactly like tiled floors, making it seem like an element of the building’s past has been elegantly restored.

Like a screen printer, de Riba works layer by layer, first painting the entirety of the space he plans to cover, then working one colored stencil at a time to build up the tile-like effect. The end result is a trick to the eyes both with materials and placement, one never expecting that spray paint formed the intricate patterns on the dusty floors.

The artist and creative designer was born in Barcelona and has worked as an art director in various agencies and studios. His current job is at Reskate Arts & Crafts Collective, a company that develops graphics and communication projects with a focus on sustainability and humane treatment. (via Junk Culture)

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Lisbon is Subverting Street Art Cliches Through Creative Workshops for Older People

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LATA 65 is connecting art between generational divides, matching older citizens of Lisbon with a relatively young form of art—graffiti (“lata” means “can” in Portuguese). Through workshops attendees learn the history of street art while making their own stencils and tags, ultimately incorporating their work in murals across the city. These bright colors go into run-down parts of the Lisbon, and each new artist is aided by the help of well-known street artists.

The goal of LATA 65 is to eliminate the many cliches that come with street art by widening both its audience and participants. Through introducing the art of graffiti to a different group of makers, the project hopes to create a solidarity between all groups involved while adding some colorful designs to the city along the way. (via mashkulture, Messy Nessy Chic, CollabCubed, and mental_floss)

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