Tag Archives: street art

Expansive Black and White Patterns Mixed With Chrome Color Spectrums in Murals by Felipe Pantone 

Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone creates public murals that integrate black and white patterns with bright sweeping color spectrums. His tag “Pantone” is an evolution of his original name “Pant” chosen when he was just thirteen, a complete coincidence despite his color-rich works. His mash-up of grids and glitch-like 3D forms imbue the pieces with a throw-back digital futurism, an aesthetic that feels extremely grounded in 80s graphic design.

Pantone travels all over the world painting his bold murals, visiting Seoul, Madrid, Taipei, and Ibiza within the last year. One of his most recent, Chromadynamica, was created for LisbonWeek and can be seen below. You can view more of his graphically-oriented public works on his Instagram and Facebook. (thnx, Laura!)

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Quirky Murals and Street Interventions of Anonymous Silhouette Figures by Daan Botlek 

Playing with aspects of negative space and scale, Rotterdam-based artist Daan Botlek (previously) fills walls with his trademark anonymous figures, often interacting with their environment in strikingly inventive ways. The artist incorporates basic geometric elements, existing shadows, architectural elements, and found textures to depict silhouette figures that appear to fight against gravity or even themselves.

Botlek completed several pieces as part of a residency at Laboratório de Actividades Criativas in Lagos last year, and you can see more of his recent work on Instagram.

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New Designs Printed Directly From Urban Utility Covers by Berlin-Based Pirate Printers 

Berlin-based art collective Raubdruckerin (which translates to pirate printer) (previously) uses elements of urban design to create guerilla printing presses, adding ink to manhole covers, grates, and street tiles to create utilitarian designs on t-shirts and bags. The experimental print makers view the works as footprints of a particular city, with current designs collected from Amsterdam, Athens, Paris, Lisbon, and their hometown of Berlin.

By printing each of the works outside, members of Raubdruckerin are immersed in the population of each city they print, imparting spectacle on aspects of a city’s design that are often overlooked. Other motivations of the project include a desire to stimulate a new perception to their audience’s surroundings, redefine everyday routines, and encourage printed sustainability. The group is incredibly considerate of the source of all materials that go into production, making sure to choose the right manufacturers for each certified organic cotton wearable and eco friendly ink.

The collective is currently on a tour through Europe through early May. You can follow their printing stops on their Facebook and Instagram, and see more urban printed designs on their online shop.

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Animals Etched onto Dirty Cars by Illustrator Nikita Golubev 

Over the last few weeks, Moscow-based artist and illustrator Nikita Golubev has taken to the streets to etch images of animals onto the sides of completely filthy vehicles. The reductive process involves creating “clean” spots by wiping or scraping his images onto the gritty surface of each car. You can see more from his “Dirty Art” series on Facebook. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Geometric Portraits Constructed with Reclaimed Wood by ‘Strook’ 

Working with recycled wood doors and paneling pulled from old houses, Belgian artist Stefaan De Croock aka Strook (previously) constructs both large and small-scale geometric portraits. Each piece is designed individually using multiple fragments of cut wood which he mixes and matches to form a sort of color palette. He also creates similar works on canvas.

Strook’s most recent piece was an enormous wooden assemblage for the Crystal Ship, a new art festival in Ostend, Belgium now in its second year. You can see more of his recent work on Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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Fun Black and White Murals of Friends and Family by Alex Senna 

It’s not often that you walk down the street and encounter an artwork that warms your heart or brings a smile to your face, but for Brazilian street artist and muralist Alex Senna, positive emotion seems to be his visual currency. His lanky black and white characters are often found in a variety of hopeful, loving, and positive scenes from a pair of lovers embracing to a family riding a bicycle. To intensify their emotional depth Senna often gives the flat characters broad shadows that stretch out larger-than-life across urban walls. You can check out more of Senna’s work on Instagram.

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