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Art

Miniature Installations of Decorative Doors Hidden in Plain Sight on the Streets of Atlanta

August 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Tucked under tunnels and nestled in public parks are several miniature doors, tiny installations built with stoops, welcome mats, and even tinier dog doors. The Atlanta-based works are part of artist Karen Anderson’s Tiny Doors ATL, an art project that aims to bring a bit of curiosity and wonder to the city’s inhabitants.

The project began in the summer of 2014, and since its launch has installed 12 six-inch doors throughout Atlanta. To keep with Tiny Doors ATL’s mission of being dedicated to free and accessible art, a digital map found on the project’s website serves as a guide to each door’s location.

For each new door Anderson hosts a miniature ribbon-cutting ceremony, a way to present the work to the public, while also connecting community members and fans of the miniature works. “I love the potential for art to build community,” Anderson told Instagram’s blog. “And I especially love how impactful that art can be when it’s free, public and accessible to everyone.”

To see more images of Tiny Doors ATL’s public installations, and keep up-to-date with upcoming openings, take a look at the group’s Instagram and Facebook. (via Instagram)

 

 



Art Photography

Temporary Calligraphy Illuminates Historic Sites Throughout Europe

August 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Mexican calligraffiti artist Said Dokins combines calligraphy writing with graffiti techniques to create public murals that address conflicts of power, destruction, and control imposed by both historic and contemporary regimes. His latest project, Heliographies of Memory, uses luminous tools to explore displaced memory, creating light paintings that use famous historic buildings or other iconic sites as temporary backdrops.

“‘Heliographies of Memory’ consist in a series of photographs that capture the calligraphic gesture, the very moment where the action of inscription is taking place,” said Dokins. “…The texts are written with light, so the words disappear as soon as they were suggested by the moves of the calligrapher, invisible to the simple eye, they just can be captured by a process of long-exposure photography, that reveal what happened, even though no one could see it.”

Dokins collaborates with photographer Leonardo Luna to capture each of his ephemeral interventions. Together they opened the 2017 OASTRALE Biennale of Contemporary Art in Dresden with a choreographed calligraphy presentation. You can see more images of their project Heliographies of Memory on Dokins’ Instagram and Facebook. (via I Support Street Art)

 

 



Art

Densely Textured Murals Reminiscent of Topographical Maps by ‘Klone’

August 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

As part of an ongoing body of work titled Personal Topography, artist Klone has painted murals around the world in this distinct, striped style. The paintings of creatures and people are meant as a visual metaphor for the ways in which personalities and inner identities differ. “The series explores both the way each [person] and other creatures have their own topography, represented by the topographical lines,” Klone shares with Colossal. “The simplicity of colour limitations provides the idea in a direct approach and there is a constant attempt to work with the surface and not necessarily make it disappear, so the wall stays a wall and a building is still the building.”

The works seen here went up in Canada, the United States, Poland, Norway, Ukraine and Israel over the last year. Klone was born in Ukraine and now lives and works in Tel Aviv. You can see more of his work on his website and on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Origami Animals Bound Across Walls in Murals by ‘Annatomix’ 

August 18, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Annatomix, a self-taught painter from Birmingham UK, creates geometric, origami-inspired animals on everyday materials of all sizes. Bumblebees and rabbits take shape on small surfaces like discarded paper bags and wood scraps, while foxes and peregrine falcons scale the sides of buildings. Crafted in acrylic and spray paint, pastels, graphite, and ink, her animal renderings balance a fantastical element while also responding to the environment they are painted into.

The artist’s lifelong interest in science, history, religion and philosophy have lead to her current body of work, which is “centered on nature of science and its connection with spirituality. I am using sacred geometry as the starting point to explore a broad range of themes that include; the creation of the universe,  evolution and extinction, repetition and cycles in history, the illusion of reality,” as she describes on her website.

Annatomix’s newest murals will go up this week in Sweden as a part of the street art Artscape Festival and you can see recent in-progress and finished work on her Instagram. Many of her smaller pieces are also for sale on her website.

 

 



Art

A Turbulent Black Sea Fills a Three-Story Wall in Kiev, Ukraine

August 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

London-born and Cape Town-based artist Jake Aikman paints scenes that aim to capture the mysterious nature of environments at the edge of civilization, producing dramatic seascapes and dense patches of tropical forests in his oil paintings. His latest work moves from canvas to wall, upscaling his practice for the first time to produce a three-story tall mural of a stormy Black Sea. The two-layer public painting was produced for Art United Us over nine days last month in Kiev, Ukraine. You can see more of Aikman’s work on his Instagram and through SMAC Gallery where he is represented. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

 

 



Art

Tiny Street Murals by ‘Jaune’ Unveil a World of Miniature City Workers

August 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Belgian stencil artist Jonathan Pauwels, or “Jaune,” creates urban interventions in his hometown of Brussels, Belgium, stenciling tiny sanitation workers on pipes, door frames, and brick walls. His small-scale installations give a peek into the world of the miniature workers, one where they engage in amusing activities that seem to cause more disorder than good.

“Despite performing an important public service in garish fluorescent clothing, I observed that [sanitation workers] exist in the background of our urban environment, becoming almost invisible to the average person,” says Jaune about the series in an artist statement on his website. “It was in 2011 that I decided to free these characters from their roles by symbolically placing them in ever more absurd and whimsical scenarios in and around the city streets. Those who were supposed to keep the world tidy have become harbingers of chaos.”

You can see dozens of more pieces from Jaune’s street-based series on his Instagram and his website. (via Laughing Squid)

 

  

 

 



Art

A Village Encapsulated Inside a 5-Story Robot’s Head and Other Recent Murals by ‘Phlegm’

August 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

This past month, Sheffield-based artist Phlegm (previously) revealed his latest mural, a 5-story tall robot on Chapel Street in Melbourne, Australia. The mechanical monster hides a village, or maybe an entire world, beneath its metal scalp, which it reveals while simultaneously dangling a lantern over the homes below. To create the work, Phlegm worked with the building’s mechanics, repurposing a flashing carpark light near the structure’s third floor into a beating heart for his large-scale visitor. You can see more of the muralist’s black and white illustrative pieces from the last year in Manchester, Florida, Oslo, and Toronto, as well as a time-lapse video of his Melbourne-based robot mural, below.