surreal

Posts tagged
with surreal



Animation History Photography

Surreal Animated Photos and Artworks by Nicolas Monterrat

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Illustrator and animator Nicolas Monterrat (previously) has brought his wild imagination to historical photographs and artworks that he sets in motion and shares on Ello. The short animations blend images borrowed from old catalogues, newspapers, and textbooks with snippets of abstract footage to create collage-like images that range from humorous to downright terrifying. You can follow more from the Paris-based artist on Tumblr. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art Food History

The Wines of Gala: Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist Wine Guide Republished for the First Time in 40 Years

November 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Last published in 1978, The Wines of Gala is Salvador Dalí’s eccentric guide to wine grapes and their origin. Filled with over 140 appropriated artworks and collages collected and created by Dalí, the book is an equally surreal follow-up to TASCHEN’s reprinting of the artist’s cookbook Les Diners de Gala. In addition to Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus, which was a constant point of reference in Dali’s works, visuals include a Bacchus-like kitten, and a sort of tableau vivant featuring Dali himself.

In keeping with Dalí’s efforts to create artwork based on his emotions, memories, and dreams, the artist chose to organize the wines in the book by how they influenced his mood. The groupings are appropriately imaginative classifications including such section titles as “Wines of Frivolity,” “Wines of the Impossible,” and “Wines of Light.” A section in the book also outlines Dalí’s method of ordering wine by emotional experience, quoting the artist’s famous credo: “A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.”

The 296-page wine bible published by TASCHEN is now available for pre-order. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 

 



Art Illustration

Ethereal Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh Explore Cultural Displacement and Elements of Folklore

November 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

North Carolina-based painter Duy Huynh (previously) infuses his acrylic paintings with whimsical elements of visual storytelling, where a plume of instruments rises from a rushing locomotive and the moon hovers as a balloon tethered to the wrist of a woman. Huynh arrived in the U.S. from Vietnam in the 1980s and often revisits this period of cultural acclimatization in his artwork. Via his artist statement:

Themes of geographical and cultural displacement are prevalent in Duy’s artwork. Ethereal characters maintain a serene, precarious balance, often in a surreal or dreamlike setting. With his figures, Duy explores motion along with emotion in order to portray not just the beauty of the human form, but also the triumph of the human spirit.

Huynh is the co-owner of Lark & Key Gallery and many of his original works and prints are currently available.

 

 



Art

Surreal Architectural Collages That Float Above Serene Landscapes by Matthias Jung

October 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Matthias Jung (previously here and here) collages unique elements of architecture to create imaginary homes set in isolated landscapes. The works float above environments on the outskirts of civilization, appearing like a mirage above rolling plains or an arctic glacier.

The details Jung chooses for his compositions are selected based on the feelings they elicit. For example, the German designer might select latticed windows to convey a sense of coziness in a work, while including concrete to provoke a certain coldness. When combined, the homes serve as short poems, collaged emotions packaged into surreal structures.

Jung began the series of houses in early January 2015. You can view more of his past architectural collages by visiting his website gallery here.

 

 



Photography

Everyday Scenes Imbued With Surreal Mystery by Photographer Brooke DiDonato

October 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based photographer Brooke DiDonato twists everyday scenes to include subtle elements of mystery or illusion. In her works, flowers protrude from city pipes or replace laces in a pair of dress shoes, while disembodied arms reach out from a wall of dense foliage. Each work suggests that there is something missing from the scene, a specific peculiarity that’s hard to pinpoint.

“The bulk of my images are set in real locations, but the characters in them are often exaggerated or imagined,” DiDonato told Colossal. “I’m interested in blending these different elements together and delivering them through a medium that was traditionally thought of as a way to archive our realities.”

DiDonato also creates videos that has the same dreamy perspective present in her static images. To see more of her work visit her website or Instagram.

 

 



Art

Surreal Drawings Created From Ballpoint Pen and Embroidery by Nuria Riaza

August 25, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish artist Nuria Riaza uses bright blue ballpoint ink to create drawings of segmented faces and other surreal scenes, pieces that capture an expressive detail most would not associate with the everyday office supply. Riaza has been attracted to the medium since she was five or six, and fully dedicated herself to working with ballpoint pens since she was around 21-years-old.

The process is one of her favorite aspects of the medium, losing herself in the many hours it takes to finish each drawing. In addition to the blue ink, Riaza sometimes incorporates embroidery to give a warmth to the work, adding small details of gold or red thread to emphasize the surreal qualities of specific drawings. Despite branching out to experiment with other mediums, these elements are only ever a small part of her practice, ballpoint pen continuing to serve as her main inspiration.

“I recommend that you try and use the pen as something more than a writing tool—to eat it as if it were a toothpick, to make fake tattoos with it, to use them as rollers in your hair, and to draw a lot,” says Riaza in her artist statement. “It’s something almost therapeutic, like how people draw mandalas, and you learn that the mistakes are also beautiful on paper.”

You can see more of her blue drawings and peaks into future projects on her Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



Art

River Stones with Pouches Unzip to Reveal Hidden Scenes and Objects

July 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Japanese artist Hirotoshi Ito’s sculptural works are a surreal contradiction of materials that seemingly shouldn’t exist, and yet here they are. The smooth stones of variable shape and size are each embedded with zippers that open to reveal hidden objects like collections of coins or marbles, while some of his more popular works incorporate a rather sinister toothy mouth. Ito finds the rocks in a riverbed near his home and works with the natural shape of each object to form the pouch and scene inside.

Ito had a solo show last month at Little High Gallery in Tokyo called “Mysterious Stone!” and you can see more of his ongoing stone carving work on Facebook. (via Geyser of Awesome)