surreal

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Art

Surreal New Adventures and Absurd Vintage Moments by Paco Pomet

January 9, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Artist Paco Pomet (previously) continues to channel old vintage snapshots and historical documentation in his delightfully surreal oil paintings. While all of his paintings capture his unmistakable wit, many of the works seem to straddle a fine line between humor and horror. Using a monochrome base, Pomet selectively adds color to highlight the focal point of the narrative and to heighten the vintage, hand-colored photo aesthetic, while playing with elements of scale, and contemporary technology icons.

Pomet lives and works in Grenada, Spain, and is represented by galleries in Spain, the US, and Denmark. He shares snapshots of work and life on Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Surreal Moments Composed with Familiar Objects by Photographer Elspeth Diederix

January 8, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Elspeth Diederix captures everyday objects and moments in a surreal light. Her photographs are simply presented yet arduously composed, with most images taking days of preparation and design to achieve the right appearance. Although Diederix is inspired by familiar objects, it is when she stumbles across these materials in a foreign landscape that the true magic of her photographic practice is revealed.

“It is only when I am out of my everyday life and free from its repetition that I have the space to truly see what is around me,” Diederix told Time Magazine. “Being in places unknown to me forces those abstract moments to appear more frequently and allows me to concentrate on finding the right location for the right object.”

Diederix was born in Nairobi, Kenya in 1971, and raised in Colombia. She studied painting and sculpture at the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam between 1990 and 1995, and at the Rijksakademie in Amsterdam from 1998-2000. You can see more of Diederix’s work on her website, and view recent experiments between gardening and photography on her Instagram and blog.

 

 



Animation History Photography

Surreal Animated Photos and Artworks by Nicolas Monterrat

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Illustrator and animator Nicolas Monterrat (previously) has brought his wild imagination to historical photographs and artworks that he sets in motion and shares on Ello. The short animations blend images borrowed from old catalogues, newspapers, and textbooks with snippets of abstract footage to create collage-like images that range from humorous to downright terrifying. You can follow more from the Paris-based artist on Tumblr. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art Food History

The Wines of Gala: Salvador Dalí’s Surrealist Wine Guide Republished for the First Time in 40 Years

November 2, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Last published in 1978, The Wines of Gala is Salvador Dalí’s eccentric guide to wine grapes and their origin. Filled with over 140 appropriated artworks and collages collected and created by Dalí, the book is an equally surreal follow-up to TASCHEN’s reprinting of the artist’s cookbook Les Diners de Gala. In addition to Jean-François Millet’s The Angelus, which was a constant point of reference in Dali’s works, visuals include a Bacchus-like kitten, and a sort of tableau vivant featuring Dali himself.

In keeping with Dalí’s efforts to create artwork based on his emotions, memories, and dreams, the artist chose to organize the wines in the book by how they influenced his mood. The groupings are appropriately imaginative classifications including such section titles as “Wines of Frivolity,” “Wines of the Impossible,” and “Wines of Light.” A section in the book also outlines Dalí’s method of ordering wine by emotional experience, quoting the artist’s famous credo: “A real connoisseur does not drink wine but tastes of its secrets.”

The 296-page wine bible published by TASCHEN is now available for pre-order. (via It’s Nice That)

 

 

 



Art Illustration

Ethereal Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh Explore Cultural Displacement and Elements of Folklore

November 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

North Carolina-based painter Duy Huynh (previously) infuses his acrylic paintings with whimsical elements of visual storytelling, where a plume of instruments rises from a rushing locomotive and the moon hovers as a balloon tethered to the wrist of a woman. Huynh arrived in the U.S. from Vietnam in the 1980s and often revisits this period of cultural acclimatization in his artwork. Via his artist statement:

Themes of geographical and cultural displacement are prevalent in Duy’s artwork. Ethereal characters maintain a serene, precarious balance, often in a surreal or dreamlike setting. With his figures, Duy explores motion along with emotion in order to portray not just the beauty of the human form, but also the triumph of the human spirit.

Huynh is the co-owner of Lark & Key Gallery and many of his original works and prints are currently available.

 

 



Art

Surreal Architectural Collages That Float Above Serene Landscapes by Matthias Jung

October 26, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Matthias Jung (previously here and here) collages unique elements of architecture to create imaginary homes set in isolated landscapes. The works float above environments on the outskirts of civilization, appearing like a mirage above rolling plains or an arctic glacier.

The details Jung chooses for his compositions are selected based on the feelings they elicit. For example, the German designer might select latticed windows to convey a sense of coziness in a work, while including concrete to provoke a certain coldness. When combined, the homes serve as short poems, collaged emotions packaged into surreal structures.

Jung began the series of houses in early January 2015. You can view more of his past architectural collages by visiting his website gallery here.

 

 



Photography

Everyday Scenes Imbued With Surreal Mystery by Photographer Brooke DiDonato

October 23, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based photographer Brooke DiDonato twists everyday scenes to include subtle elements of mystery or illusion. In her works, flowers protrude from city pipes or replace laces in a pair of dress shoes, while disembodied arms reach out from a wall of dense foliage. Each work suggests that there is something missing from the scene, a specific peculiarity that’s hard to pinpoint.

“The bulk of my images are set in real locations, but the characters in them are often exaggerated or imagined,” DiDonato told Colossal. “I’m interested in blending these different elements together and delivering them through a medium that was traditionally thought of as a way to archive our realities.”

DiDonato also creates videos that has the same dreamy perspective present in her static images. To see more of her work visit her website or Instagram.