surreal

Posts tagged
with surreal



Illustration

Lovely Storybook Illustrations of People Communing with Nature by Jin Xingye

April 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Each image created by Chinese illustrator Jin Xingye seems suggest a moment from an untold story, where people and creatures appear to share surreal, tender moments from within a larger narrative. You can see more of his recent work over on Behance. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Illustration

New Surreal Illustrations From the Mind of Simon Prades

March 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Illustrator and graphic designer Simon Prades (previously here and here) creates illusion and intrigue through old school methods of illustration, choosing to loyally stick to pen and ink as his go-to medium. Despite choosing to clean up and sometimes color his work digitally, Prades’ physical mark making remains apparent, such as in the realistic details provided in his subjects’ faces.

The German illustrator tends to focus on select colors when creating work for clients such as The New York Times, The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and The Atlantic, staying within a palette of bright greens and yellows, and muted blues. You can see more of Prades’ recent editorial work on his Instagram, Tumblr and Behance.

 

 



Illustration

Whimsical Storybook Illustrations by Antanas Gudonis

January 30, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Antanas Gudonis is a Helsinki-based illustrator who created this wonderful series of images as part of a personal project centered on a handful of rotund egg-like creatures and their adventures. You can see more of his digital illustration work on Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Radiant Sunsets and Landscapes Hidden Inside Forgotten Places by Andrew McIntosh

January 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Scottish painter Andrew McIntosh (aka Mackie) takes ubiquitous structures often abandoned on rural homesteads like travel campers or sheds and reveals hidden worlds within: radiant sunsets and expansive skies that appear like portals into another place. Drawing inspiration from a childhood spent in the Highlands of Scotland, the London-based painter gives unexpected life to derelict buildings set against the backdrop of mist-filled woods and frozen mountains. From his artist statement:

My paintings are an exercise in attraction. Through them I am constantly searching for new ways of communicating with the viewer. By seducing them with my imagery, I try to create a new visual language with the power to pique their attention and make them stop to ask: why? Desolate landscapes, decrepit houses, and incongruous moments of glory come together to suggest the presence of a narrative that exists as much in the viewer’s mind as in the painting. This is how I aim to use my works: as the space for an imaginary dialogue between strangers.

McIntosh most recently exhibited a new body of work with bo.lee gallery last month titled “Where we Belong” at Pulse Miami. You can see many more recent paintings in his online portfolio. (via The Jealous Curator)

 

 



Art Illustration

New Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic

December 9, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic (previously) paints nature in a way that is both direct and obscure, producing animals with the precision of a tightly rendered nature illustration, while simultaneously escaping the form’s limitations. Her subject matter typically revolves around forest creatures and their environment, while occasionally including creatures and plants such as amoeba-like jellyfish, creepy insects, and exotic flowers. These diverse sects of the natural world combine in ways that are not natural at all—a deer’s soft hair appearing as moss in one work while a skunk gallantly balances on top of a hovering botanical bouquet in another.

Bozic is represented by Joshua Liner Gallery in NYC where she has an upcoming solo exhibition next fall. You can see more of her work on her Instagram and buy select prints from her website.

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Illustration

Digital Artist Mike Winkelmann Creates Daily Conceptual Illustrations Spanning Nearly a Decade

October 21, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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For over 9 years, graphic designer and digital artist Mike Winkelmann (aka Beeple) has endeavored to create a new digital illustration every single day. From abstract blobs of metallic goo to fully-realized science fiction landscapes, Winkelmann shares every creation he makes in an uninterrupated stream online via Tumblr, Facebook and elsewhere. While some pieces are more successful than others, he says the daily act of creation is less about producing consistently solid work, and more about working through ideas, quickly working through the bad ones, and learning new tools or methods. The vast majority of what he imagines simply defies explanation or genre, and themes change dramatically from image to image. Winkelmann shares more about his process and tools in this interview with iO9. (via Behance)

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Art Food History

Salvador Dali’s Rare Surrealist Cookbook Republished for the First Time in over 40 Years

October 3, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Published only once in 1973, Les Diners de Gala was a dream fulfilled for surrealist artist Salvador Dali who claimed at the age of 6 that he wanted to be a chef. The bizarro cookbook pairs 136 recipes over 12 chapters (the 10th of which is dedicated to aphrodisiacs) with the his exceptionally strange illustrations and collages created especially for the publication. The artworks depict towering mountains of crayfish with unsettling overtones of cannibalism, an unusual meeting of a swan and a toothbrush in a pastry case, and portraits of Dali himself mingling with chefs against decadent place settings. Recipes include such delicacies as “Thousand Year Old Eggs”, “Veal Cutlets Stuffed With Snails”, “Frog Pasties”, and “Toffee with Pine Cones”.

Dali is widely known for his opulent dinner parties thrown with his wife Gala, events that were almost more theatrical than gustatory. Guests, many of the celebrities, were required to wear completely outlandish costumes and an accompaniment of wild animals often roamed free around the dinner table. Despite the unusual ingredients and preparation methods, many of the old school recipes in Les Diners de Gala originated in some of the top restaurants in Paris at the time including Lasserre, La Tour d’Argent, Maxim’s, and Le Train Bleu. Lest you think anything in the book might be remotely healthy, it offers a cautionary disclaimer at the outset:

We would like to state clearly that, beginning with the very first recipes, Les Diners de Gala, with its precepts and its illustrations, is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of Taste. Don’t look for dietetic formulas here.

We intend to ignore those charts and tables in which chemistry takes the place of gastronomy. If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.

Only around 400 copies of Les Diners de Gala are known to survive, most of which sell for hundreds of dollars. However Taschen has finally made this rare book available for the first time in 43 years as a new reprint currently available for pre-order. If this whets your Dali appetite, don’t miss the 150th anniversary edition of his 1969 illustrations for Alice in Wonderland. (via Brain Pickings, It’s Nice That)

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