Tag Archives: textiles

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

I promise Colossal won’t turn into a full-time embroidery blog, but Munich-based Veselka Bulkan from Green Accordion created these fun felted veggies that dangle hang from embroidered leaves. Currently available in two different designs. (via Whimsebox)

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self-Taught Artist Mr. Finch

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

The self-taught artist Mr. Finch is part hunter, part gatherer and fully genius. Obsessed with the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch goes gathering for inspiration. “Flowers, insects and birds really fascinate me with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour,” says the artist. He then goes hunting for vintage textiles—velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron—and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. The aged feel creates a sense of authenticity, or mystery; as if each piece has an incredible story to tell.

Mr. Finch works alone so all his work is limited. You can see all his creations and keep up with him on Facebook. (thnx, Kirsty!)

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

I’m thrilled to announce that Colossal has teamed up with our friends over at Threadless to create a new series of artist profiles called Paid in Full. The premise is simple: we find amazing artists and commission a new project of their choosing and film everything for you to see. Our only goal is to promote the creation of new art and to tell the stories of our favorite creatives working today.

For this first installment we approached Minneapolis artist Eric Rieger aka HoTTea (previously) who works with miles and miles of yarn to create non-destructive street art installations. For Paid in Full he transformed this neglected tennis court into a giant translucent rainbow-like structure. Watch the video above to see it all come together and learn more about HoTTea.

Last week I learned the city and local community in Minneapolis enjoyed the piece so much that for the first time they began locking the tennis court at night to protect the artwork. So great! A huge thanks to Sean Dorgan, Craig Shimala, and Collin Diederich for putting this all together.

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88-Year-Old Grandmother

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

A Huge Collection of Embroidered Temari Spheres by an 88 Year Old Grandmother toys textiles embroidery balls

Temari balls are a form of folk art that originated in China and were introduced to Japan in the 7th century. The carefully hand-embroidered balls often made from the thread of old kimonos were created by parents or grandparents and given to children on New Year’s day as special gift. According to Wikipedia the balls would sometimes contain secret handwritten wish for the child, or else contained some kind of noise-making object like a bell.

Flickr user NanaAkua photographed this amazing collection of geometric spheres created by her 88-year-old grandmother who began to master the art in her 60s. She has since created hundreds of them, nearly 500 of which you can see right here. (via DDN Japan)

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Artist Do Ho Suh Compares His Previous Homes By Creating 1:1 Silk Replicas, One Inside the Other textiles silk sculpture installation architecture

Korean artist Do Ho Suh (previously here) has just completed his largest artwork to date at Seoul’s National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art. Titled Home Within Home Within Home Within Home Within Home, the giant installation represents two previous residences the artist lived in at 1:1 scale, one structure inside the built with jade-colored silk evoking the feel of a 3D blueprint. The smaller structure is a traditional Korean home where Suh grew up a child which he then suspended inside a replica of his first residence in the United States, a modern apartment building in Providence, Rhode Island. The piece is so large that visitors are invited to walk inside and virtually explore it which you can do through May 14, 2014. Learn more over at Lehmann Maupin and MMCA. (via My Modern Met, Wallpaper*)

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

A Yarn Bombed Tree Squid yarn bombing trees textiles

It seems like nothing is safe from yarn bombing these days from airplanes to bridges to trains. Not to be outdone, Jill Watt and her sister Lorna Watt recently wrapped this magnolia tree in downtown San Mateo with more than four miles of yarn to create this awesome squid. It’s one thing to completely cover an object in textiles, but to transform a tree into an organism like this seems that much more special. Read more about how they did it on their respective blogs Knits for Life and Dapper Toad. (via Neatorama, Laughing Squid)

Artist Do-Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

Artist Do Ho Suh Sculpts Appliances from his Manhattan Apartment out of Polyester textiles sculpture polyester

As part of his upcoming exhibition at Lehmann Maupin, Korean artist Do-Ho Suh (previously here and here) has constructed detailed, leightweight sculptures of his oven, toilet, bathtub and other fixtures found in his Manhattan apartment out of polyester fabric. The translucent nature of each piece gives the appearance of a CAD drawing or digital wireframe, but in fact each piece is a near weightless, full-size replica down to the stitched typography of the brand label. Titled Specimen Series, the exhibition will run November 14, 2013 through January 24, 2014 at Lehmann Maupin in Hong Kong. (via MOCO LOCO)

Olek Crochets an Entire Four-Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland

Olek Crochets an Entire Four Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland yarn bombing trains textiles installation crochet

Olek Crochets an Entire Four Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland yarn bombing trains textiles installation crochet

Olek Crochets an Entire Four Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland yarn bombing trains textiles installation crochet

Olek Crochets an Entire Four Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland yarn bombing trains textiles installation crochet

Olek Crochets an Entire Four Car Locomotive in Lodz, Poland yarn bombing trains textiles installation crochet

Textile artist Olek has just completed work on what may be her largest piece ever, a four-car locomotive covered in crocheted technicolor camo in Lodz, Poland. The artist didn’t even stop to change out of a costume she wore at the Animal Ball in London before jumping on a plane to meet four assistants who began a four-day assault on the large train that was completed on July 19th. You may remember Olek’s work from just over a year ago here on Colossal when she crocheted an entire alligator-themed playground in São Paulo. The locomotive will be on view through August 19th, and you can see more over on Hi-Fructose.

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