Tag Archives: textiles

Soundweaving: Artist Converts Folk Embroidery Patterns into Paper Scores for Music Boxes

Soundweaving is a recent project by Hungarian design student Zsanett Szirmay that turns patterns used in traditional folk embroidery into music by translating them into laser-cut punch cards fed through a custom music box. The project was partially inspired by actual paper cards used in some weaving looms to easily reproduce patterns for various textiles. Szirmay collaborated with musician and composer Bálint Tárkány-Kovács who helped with audio mapping and the development of each track. Soundweaving was on view as part of Vienna Design Week at MOME Laboratory through last week, and you can see much more over on Dezeen. I’ve had the video above playing in the background for the last 20 minutes or so, it’s surprisingly enjoyable, especially if you’re into Steve Reich or Philip Glass.

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks

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Wisdom / 11″h x 11″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed wool in Wall-Hanging Shadow Box

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Autumn Hawk / 8″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Wool housed in a Glass Dome

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Still This Heart / 4″h x 4″w x 4″d / Hand-dyed wool under Glass Dome

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Study In Monochrome / 9″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Silk and Wool under Glass Dome

Textile artist Lana Crooks constructs extremely realistic small anatomical specimens from hand-dyed silk and wool. Fascinated by “the antique, the creepy, the cute and the mysterious” Crooks has received numerous accolades for her plush toy designs and is a member of the OhNo!Doom Collective here in Chicago. You can follow her work on Facebook or Instagram and see it in person next month at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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New Vintage Textile Flora and Fauna Sculptures by Mister Finch

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Leeds-based textile artist Mister Finch (previously) is a master of artistic recycling as he breathes life into vintage fabrics by transforming them into sculptures of moths, rabbits, mushrooms, and strange hybrid lifeforms. Finch says he often draws inspiration from British folklore for his fairytale creations born from discarded velvet curtains or cloth snipped from old aprons and wedding dresses. From his artist statement:

Making things has always been incredibly important to me and is often an amazing release to get it out of my system. It’s a joy to hunt for things for my work… the lost, found and forgotten all have places in what I make. Most of my pieces use recycled materials, not only as an ethical statement, but I believe they add more authenticity and charm. A story sewn in, woven in.

What you see here is a collection of work from the past year, much more of which he shares on his blog. He also just published his first book, Mister Finch: Living in a Fairy Tale World, and has an upcoming exhibition this spring at Steven Kasher Gallery in New York.

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Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand-Stitched Felt Products

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British artist Lucy Sparrow has converted an entire abandoned corner shop in Bethnal Green, east London, into a temporary art exhibition titled The Corner Shop featruring 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Chips, magazines, candy, frozen dinners, and even the cash register have been faithfully rendered in fabric, a process that took Sparrow about seven months to complete and began with a successful plea for help on Kickstarter. The shop is open to visitors every day this month, and almost all of the items are available for purchase online. (via My Modern Met, Laughing Squid, The Jealous Curator)

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Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita

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North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita creates beautiful textile sculptures of months, butterflies, and other insects with various textiles and embroidery techniques. The pieces are quite large, measuring nearly a foot wide and contain other flourishes including painting, feathers, and artificial fur. You can many of her most recent pieces here. (via the Jealous Curator)

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Elaborate Textile ‘Collages’ of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing

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With a background in woodwork, ceramics, weaving, dressmaking, and even stained glass windows, artist Sophie Standing consolidates her breadth of talent in these explosively colorful textile collages of animals and insects. Standing was born in England but now lives and works in Kenya where she seeks inspiration in African wildlife, namely some of the world’s most endangered species like elephants, lions, and rhinoceroses. To create each piece she first paints or sketches on fabric and then draws from a vast collection of decorative fabrics acquired from her travels around the world to create a dense patchwork of color and texture. The artwork is then finished with dense line work applied with a sewing machine.

Standing is currently available for commissions, and you can see more of her work closeup in her online gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza

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Using embroidery, yarn, and and wool artist Ana Teresa Barboza creates landscapes and other imagery that exists in the space between tapestry and sculpture. Mimicking the flow of waves or grass, each piece seems to tumble from its embroidery hoop where it flows down the gallery wall. Most of the pieces seen here are from her 2013 Suspension series, though you can see more on her blog (be sure to click “entrar” next to each item). You can also read a bit more about her work on Now Contemporary Art. (via Ignant, I ♥ Art)

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