Tag Archives: textiles

Embroidered Bread Slices by Terezia Krnacova Combine Food and Textile Art 

In this fun series of six embroideries, Slovakia-based artist Terézia Krnáčová brought needle to bread as a way to combine her need for food and textile artwork, a somewhat literal expression of things that sustain her. Titled Everyday Bread the work incorporates a slice of bread for each day of the week in a different design, with the 7th slice remaining plain in honor of the sabbath. You can explore more of her sculptural and textile work on Behance. (via iGNANT)

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New One-of-a-Kind Landscape Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou 

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Argentinean artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) produces handmade wool rugs that appear like aerial snapshots of dreamy pastoral landscapes. Mimicking lush environments filled with trees and moss, her hand-tufted works can take up to several months to complete depending on size. One of her most recent pieces is a carpeted runway for designer Dries Van Noten made in collaboration with artist Danish artist Olafur Eliasson. Another piece, titled No Longer Creek and curated by Artsy, was included at this year’s Design Miami/ Basel from June 14-20.

You can take a look at more of Kehayoglou’s tufted wool landscapes on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website.

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Textile Sculptures Created From Dozens of Multicolored Orbs by Serena Garcia Dalla Venezia 

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Chilean textile artist Serena Garcia Dalla Venezia creates thoughtfully composed arrangements of hand-sewn fabric balls, producing texture and depth by grouping together dozens of differently sized and shaped spheres. Appearing almost like organic growths, her works seem to be transforming before your eyes, which makes sense when you consider her fascination with accumulation and chaos. You can see more of Venezia’s smaller works and large-scale installations on her website. (via The Jealous Curator)

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Intricate Moss Assemblages Sprout From Embroidery Hoops 

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Utilizing felt, thread, and the french knot, artist Emma Mattson stitches moss-like configurations onto embroidery hoops, latching the materials onto the base like the flowerless plants which she mimics. In addition to simulating the look of the greenery, Mattson also likes to add a few pieces of fake moss on top of her works to walk the line between imitation and reality. You can see more of her moss-based embroideries on her Instagram, and find pieces for sale on her Etsy. (via Illusion)

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Ethereal Sculptures and Wearable Orbs Formed From Synthetic Fabric by Mariko Kusumoto 

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All images provided by Mariko Kusumoto

Japanese artist Mariko Kusumoto uses translucent fabric to produce balloon-like objects, orbs that contain various forms trapped within their soft exterior. The creations inside range from smaller versions of the spherical sculptures to sea creatures and cars, playful forms that fit the bright colors Kusumoto chooses for her works. To set the polyester fabric into the shapes she desires she heats the pieces to the right temperature, allowing the material to memorize the shape she wishes to create. These works are then formed into sculptural or wearable objects, 3D jewelry that can be worn around the neck.

“My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made,” said Kusumoto in her artist statement. ” I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected.”

The Massachusetts-based artist’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Kock Collection at the Swiss National Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens and is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA. You can see more of her sculptural and wearable works on her Facebook.

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A Breathtaking Quilled Paper Carpet and Gospel Book Cover by Lisa Nilsson 

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Jardin, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 27.5″ x 34.25″ x 2.5″

Working with compact rolls of Japanese mulberry paper in a myriad of colors, artist Lisa Nilsson painstakingly creates anatomical figures and textile patterns using a centuries-old technique called quilling. In her latest artworks Jardine and Gospel, Nilsson was inspired by the patterns of an Islamic carpet and an 8th century gospel cover. The carpet piece alone was nearly 8 months in the making as she created ornate figures of flowers, stars, and other patterns to fill a 27″ by 34″ inch frame, much of which was improvised as she worked outward from the center. For Gospel she in incorporated bright gilt edged paper to mimic the actual gold used for traditional religious book covers.

You can see more views of these artworks on Nilsson’s website, and she was recently intereviewed about the new pieces on All Things Paper.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Jardin, detail.

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Gospel, 2016. Japanese mulberry paper, gilt edged paper. 19 3/8″ x 22 3/8″ x 2 3/8″

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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Gospel, detail.

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