Tag Archives: textiles

One-of-Kind Wool Rug Artworks by Alexandra Kehayoglou Mimic Rolling Pastures and Mossy Textures 

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Using scraps leftover thread from her family’s carpet factory in Buenos Aires, artist Alexandra Kehayoglou embarks on a laborious hand-tufting process to fabricate wool carpets and rugs that mimic natural textures like moss, water, trees, and pastures. The carpets balance form and function and can powerfully transform an entire room into a lush meadow dotted with pools of water and tufts of grass. Many of her works even function as part tapestry and flow from walls to floor, or work as covers for chairs or stools.

You can find more of Kehayoglou’s carpet creations on Instagram, Artsy, and on her website. (via Faith is Torment)

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A Photographic Celebration of America’s Vibrant Textile Industry by Christopher Payne 

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Typically focusing on obsolete or decrepit architectural structures, photographer Chris Payne's most recent project, Textiles, documents the aesthetics of the colorfully-hued American textile industry. His photographs showcase the bright runs of yarn and thread as the materials makes their way through the hyper-organized machinery, appearing digitally altered in their extreme hot pinks, vibrant reds, and electric blues.

Payne began photographing the factories and mills in America’s Northeast in 2010. The images are not just snapshots of the industry, but photographs that sometimes took months to catch. Due to the machinery’s continuous run and his inability to halt production, Payne had to wait until the perfect moment when the right color would appear, or the parts of the machinery would perfectly align. Payne also features the workers within his documentation of the diminishing domestic industry, explaining that their inclusion is proof that labor and craftsmanship is still valued in our current economy.

“Over the past five years, I have gained access to an industry that continues to thrive, albeit on a much smaller scale, and for the most part, out of public view,” said Payne. “Many mills are doing quite well, having modernized to stay competitive, while others have survived by catering to niche markets that value the ‘genuine article’ produced on the original, vintage equipment. I view my work as a celebration of American manufacturing—not a eulogy.

Trained as an architect, Payne typically shoots architectural structures using large format documentation to capture America’s industrial landscape. Past projects have included exploring America’s asylums and an uninhabited island named North Brother Island in New York City’s East River. Payne’s Asylum series will appear at Benrubi Gallery February 11, 2016 and run through March 26, 2016. (via Huffington Post)

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

Bartlettyarns, Harmony, Maine

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Fall River Knitting Mills, Fall River, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Polartec, Lawrence, Massachusetts

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Langhorne Carpet, Penndel, Pennsylvania

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

Conrad-Jarvis, Pawtucket, Rhode Island

 

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Bloomsburg Carpet, Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

Darn Tough Socks, Cabot Hosiery Mills, Northfield, Vermont

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

S&D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts

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Faig Ahmed Creates Glitched-Out Contemporary Rugs from Traditional Azerbaijani Textiles 

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Faig Ahmed distorts the patterns of traditional Azerbaijani rugs, dimantling their structure in order to build compositions that trick the eye by appearing to melt off the wall. By rearticulating the original design, he creates contemporary sculptural forms that look like digital glitches, patterns flatlining halfway through a tapestry or gradually morphing into a digital mosaic.

Ahmed explains that his fascination for textiles stems from their historical value, humanity utilizing fabric for nearly the entire length of human history. “Another thing that interests me is pattern,” says Ahmed. “Patterns and ornaments can be found in all cultures, sometimes similar, sometimes very different. I consider them words and phrases that can be read and translated to a language we understand.”

Ahmed lives and works in Baku, Azerbaijan and graduated from the sculpture department of Azerbaijan State Academy of Fine Art in 2004. The artist previously focused on painting, video, and installation, but now currently focuses on textile and sculpture. Ahmed recently had a solo exhibition with Italian gallery Montoro12 titled “Omnia Mutantur, Nihil Interit,” and is currently in the group exhibition “Crafted: Objects in Flux” at The Museum of Fine Arts in Boston until January 10, 2016. (via Booooooom)

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New Ornate Kaleidoscopic Installations That Mimic Patterned Textiles by Suzan Drummen 

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Meticulously placing small, ornate materials in eye-dazzling patterns Suzan Drummen (previously) produces kaleidoscopic installations that appear like three dimensional textiles. Within these pieces Drummen likes to explore how artwork can seduce and repulse, drawing the viewer in to take a closer look at the specific details that form the larger installation.

“From a distance they appear clear and orderly, yet upon closer inspection, the eyes become disoriented by the many details and visual stimuli,” said Drummen. “That moment of being able to take it all in or not is explored time and time again.”

Although many of her pieces when zoomed out appear like textiles, a recent installation takes this to heart, appearing like two oriental rugs—one in the color scheme of pink and red and the other in greens and blues. The first piece subtly climbs up the wall, playing further into the illusionistic quality of how her crystal constructions are perceived. This optical trickery is also reflected in her works that involve bodies, ordinarily dressed participants bedazzled to match the pattern on which they sit or lay.

You can see more of the Netherlands-based artist’s work on her Facebook page here.

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Urban Jewelry: New Lace Street Art by NeSpoon 

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Since we last learned about NeSpoon last year, the Polish street artist has popped up everywhere with new pieces in Perth, Tunisia, Portugal, and elsewhere. NeSpoon translates traditional lace patterns into large-scale murals or stencils, ceramic installations, and even embroidery. The artworks are part of her ongoing series of “public jewelry” that seeks to turn unadorned spaces and surfaces into something beautiful. You can see more over on Behance.

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Soundweaving: Artist Converts Folk Embroidery Patterns into Paper Scores for Music Boxes 

Soundweaving is a recent project by Hungarian design student Zsanett Szirmay that turns patterns used in traditional folk embroidery into music by translating them into laser-cut punch cards fed through a custom music box. The project was partially inspired by actual paper cards used in some weaving looms to easily reproduce patterns for various textiles. Szirmay collaborated with musician and composer Bálint Tárkány-Kovács who helped with audio mapping and the development of each track. Soundweaving was on view as part of Vienna Design Week at MOME Laboratory through last week, and you can see much more over on Dezeen. I’ve had the video above playing in the background for the last 20 minutes or so, it’s surprisingly enjoyable, especially if you’re into Steve Reich or Philip Glass.

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Photo by Sándor Fövényi

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Anatomical Specimens Made from Hand-Dyed Wool and Silk by Lana Crooks 

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Wisdom / 11″h x 11″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed wool in Wall-Hanging Shadow Box

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Autumn Hawk / 8″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Wool housed in a Glass Dome

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Still This Heart / 4″h x 4″w x 4″d / Hand-dyed wool under Glass Dome

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Study In Monochrome / 9″h x 5″w x 5″d / Hand-dyed Silk and Wool under Glass Dome

Textile artist Lana Crooks constructs extremely realistic small anatomical specimens from hand-dyed silk and wool. Fascinated by “the antique, the creepy, the cute and the mysterious” Crooks has received numerous accolades for her plush toy designs and is a member of the OhNo!Doom Collective here in Chicago. You can follow her work on Facebook or Instagram and see it in person next month at Modern Eden Gallery in San Francisco. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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