Tag Archives: textiles

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand-Stitched Felt Products

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

Artist Stocks the Shelves of a London Corner Store with 4,000 Hand Stitched Felt Products textiles shopping London felt

British artist Lucy Sparrow has converted an entire abandoned corner shop in Bethnal Green, east London, into a temporary art exhibition titled The Corner Shop featruring 4,000 hand-sewn felt products. Chips, magazines, candy, frozen dinners, and even the cash register have been faithfully rendered in fabric, a process that took Sparrow about seven months to complete and began with a successful plea for help on Kickstarter. The shop is open to visitors every day this month, and almost all of the items are available for purchase online. (via My Modern Met, Laughing Squid, The Jealous Curator)

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Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

Textile Moth and Butterfly Sculptures by Yumi Okita textiles sculpture moths insects butterflies

North Carolina-based artist Yumi Okita creates beautiful textile sculptures of months, butterflies, and other insects with various textiles and embroidery techniques. The pieces are quite large, measuring nearly a foot wide and contain other flourishes including painting, feathers, and artificial fur. You can many of her most recent pieces here. (via the Jealous Curator)

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Elaborate Textile ‘Collages’ of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

Elaborate Textile Collages of African Wildlife by Sophie Standing textiles embroidery animals Africa

With a background in woodwork, ceramics, weaving, dressmaking, and even stained glass windows, artist Sophie Standing consolidates her breadth of talent in these explosively colorful textile collages of animals and insects. Standing was born in England but now lives and works in Kenya where she seeks inspiration in African wildlife, namely some of the world’s most endangered species like elephants, lions, and rhinoceroses. To create each piece she first paints or sketches on fabric and then draws from a vast collection of decorative fabrics acquired from her travels around the world to create a dense patchwork of color and texture. The artwork is then finished with dense line work applied with a sewing machine.

Standing is currently available for commissions, and you can see more of her work closeup in her online gallery. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Embroidered Landscapes and Plants by Ana Teresa Barboza textiles landscapes embroidery

Using embroidery, yarn, and and wool artist Ana Teresa Barboza creates landscapes and other imagery that exists in the space between tapestry and sculpture. Mimicking the flow of waves or grass, each piece seems to tumble from its embroidery hoop where it flows down the gallery wall. Most of the pieces seen here are from her 2013 Suspension series, though you can see more on her blog (be sure to click “entrar” next to each item). You can also read a bit more about her work on Now Contemporary Art. (via Ignant, I ♥ Art)

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Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

Felted Veggies Dangle from Embroidered Leaves vegetables textiles food embroidery

I promise Colossal won’t turn into a full-time embroidery blog, but Munich-based Veselka Bulkan from Green Accordion created these fun felted veggies that dangle hang from embroidered leaves. Currently available in two different designs. (via Whimsebox)

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Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self-Taught Artist Mr. Finch

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

Vintage Textiles Transformed Into Flora and Fauna by Self Taught Artist Mr. Finch textiles sculpture plants animals

The self-taught artist Mr. Finch is part hunter, part gatherer and fully genius. Obsessed with the rolling hills and mossy woods near his home in Yorkshire, Finch goes gathering for inspiration. “Flowers, insects and birds really fascinate me with their amazing life cycles and extraordinary nests and behaviour,” says the artist. He then goes hunting for vintage textiles—velvet curtains from an old hotel, a threadbare wedding dress or a vintage apron—and transforms them into all sorts of beasts and toadstools. The aged feel creates a sense of authenticity, or mystery; as if each piece has an incredible story to tell.

Mr. Finch works alone so all his work is limited. You can see all his creations and keep up with him on Facebook. (thnx, Kirsty!)

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Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

Optimist: Artist HOTTEA Uses Miles of Yarn to Create a Field of Color Over a Neglected Tennis Court yarn textiles string installation
Sean Dorgan

I’m thrilled to announce that Colossal has teamed up with our friends over at Threadless to create a new series of artist profiles called Paid in Full. The premise is simple: we find amazing artists and commission a new project of their choosing and film everything for you to see. Our only goal is to promote the creation of new art and to tell the stories of our favorite creatives working today.

For this first installment we approached Minneapolis artist Eric Rieger aka HoTTea (previously) who works with miles and miles of yarn to create non-destructive street art installations. For Paid in Full he transformed this neglected tennis court into a giant translucent rainbow-like structure. Watch the video above to see it all come together and learn more about HoTTea.

Last week I learned the city and local community in Minneapolis enjoyed the piece so much that for the first time they began locking the tennis court at night to protect the artwork. So great! A huge thanks to Sean Dorgan, Craig Shimala, and Collin Diederich for putting this all together.

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