Tag Archives: time

Float Through Time with Flyte’s New Magnetized Clock 

Tell time or count down the moments until your next big life event with STORY, a new magnetized piece from Flyte (previously). The company’s latest design is an improvement to the wall clock, a work that uses powerful magnetism to move a hovering metal ball around STORY’s edge.

The designed object was built with three modes. With the Journey setting, you can set your mechanism to a specific date, watching the magnetic ball travel along the circular piece of wood until the ball reaches an upcoming moment such as a vacation or birth of a child. Selecting Clock allows you to use the object more like a traditional timepiece, and finally Timer acts as a short term countdown for kitchen prep or time out.

STORY also features a shining digital display to add detail to your chosen setting, and is backlit to be seen in the dark. When synced with Flyte’s mobile app, you can also use the backlight to demonstrate realtime sunsets, sunrises, and phases of the moon.

STORY was just launched on Kickstarter. You can see more of Flyte’s levitating designs, including a set of floating planters, on their website.

 

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This 24-Hour Clock Gradually Transitions You From Dusk to Dawn 

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All images via Scott Thrift

Instead of being a slave to the numbers on your clock, designer Scott Thrift would like you to have a more peaceful relationship to your timepiece, one that revolves around gradients and soothing colors rather than numerals. Today, his newest design, is a 24-hour timepiece that moves at half the speed of a typical clock, and operates on times of the day rather than numeric classifications. The subtle blues and purples that make up the clock’s gradient break down the day into dawn, noon, dusk, and midnight, allowing for a gradual transition rather than one that evokes stress by watching numbers tick by.

You can preorder Today on Thrift’s Kickstarter, or visit his previous clock design The Present on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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Photographic Images That Weave Moments in Time by Jason Chen 

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Detail of “K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75, all images via Paradigm Gallery + Studio, Philadelphia

Moving beyond traditionally static methods of portraiture, Jason Chen creates movement through the weaving of multiple images into one. Chen’s works use separate images of the same subject to explore mutation and time, offering a more fluid peek into his subject’s emotional state. When glanced at from afar the images appear quite singular, but when zoomed in the disparate details of the images stand out—multiple eyes occupying the same face like seen in Chen’s haunting G-iii.

This is a relatively new method for the Philadelphia-based photographer who had been previously focused on dry plate tintypes. Chen is the co-founder of Paradigm Gallery + Studio where he is currently included in the group exhibition “Portrait”  through June 18th. (via Hi Fructose)

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“K,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“Ian” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36”w

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“Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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Detail of “Jessica” (2016), archival pigment print, hand cut and woven, 24”h x 36” w

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“C,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 9in x 11in

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“G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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Detail of “G-iii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 22.75in x 28.75

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“G-ii,” hand-woven archival inkjet print, 20.5in x 20.5in

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A 3D Printed Sundial Displays Time Like a Digital Clock 

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Using a clever mix of 3D printing and a few well-placed shadows, this sundial designed by Mojoptix projects the actual time as if displayed on a digital clock. The plastic component that casts the shadow—called a gnomon— is printed with extremely tiny holes that create pinpoint dots of light in the form of digits as the sun shines through during the day.

The sundial does have its limitations. The time only shows in 20 minute increments and it only works from 10am to 4pm during the day. Regardless, the results are no less miraculous when you see it in use in the video below (skip to around 13:00 to see it in motion).

The completed device is available for purchase here, or you can download the design files and print your own. (via My Modern Met)

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The Visually Stunning ‘Tesseract’ Scene in Interstellar was Filmed on a Physically Constructed Set 

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Spoiler alert. One of the most jaw-dropping moments of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar is the climactic moment when Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) enters a visually stunning environment that allows him to physically communicate through time using gravity. In the movie, the scene is manifested as a small library in his home that appears to infinitely repeat with versions of every moment that has ever occurred there. Essentially it’s a cube in four dimensions. Here’s a pretty good explanation of how it works:

The Tesseract is a means of communication for the bulk beings to express action through gravity with NASA. The bulk beings can perceive five dimensions as opposed to four, able to see every moment in the past, present, and future as well as influence gravity within any of those time frames. […] The tesseract allowed Cooper to communicate with Murphy Cooper [his daughter] in various time periods, presenting time itself as a dimension rather than linear. Everything is linked by the strings of time, which Cooper can manipulate. The beings made this comprehensible to Cooper by allowing him to physically interact with the Tesseract.

The idea of the tesseract scene alone was so daunting to the filmmakers, Nolan and his special effects team procrastinated for months before trying to tackle how it might work. After months of concepting and model building the team opted for the unusual approach of using minimal digital effects in favor of fabricating a massive set which the actors could physically manipulate. A remarkable feat considering not only the complexity of the concepts depicted, but the cost and labor of building something so large.

Included here are some shots of the set, a behind-the-scenes interview with Nolan and a number of people from the visual effects team explaining how it was done, and lastly the scene itself. You can watch even more of it here. (via Fubiz)

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What Color Is It? A Website that Translates the Current Time into Color 

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Created by Berlin-based artist and designer James E. Murphy, What Color Is It is a website that translates the current time (based on a 24-hour clock) into a corresponding hex color value. The color of the page changes gradually as each second ticks by. This could be a great start to a watch face for the Apple Watch. (via Swissmiss)

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