timelapse

Posts tagged
with timelapse



Amazing Science

Time-lapse Pairs Blooming Flowers with Crawling Insects

August 15, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Umwelt is a short film by Japanese artist Yoshiyuki Katayama that depicts an elegant series of flowers blooming in slow motion. Unlike other time-lapse videos we’ve seen in this genre, each flower is accompanied by an insect or spider that crawls across each flower at the precise moment it blooms. The timing is incredible considering the insects stay in view while the flower comes to life, there must be some sort of clever editing? Katayama also created a small website that gives a bit of information about each insect and flowering pairing. A vertically oriented version of Umwelt recently won 3rd prize at the 2nd Vertical Film Festival in Australia.

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Animation Art

Ignight: An Experimental Long Exposure Light Film by Daniel Barreto

June 9, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Ignite is an experimental animation from 24-year-old artist Daneil Barreto. The clip was made with hundreds of long exposure photos of various LEDs similar to a stop-motion film or timelapse—nothing is digital. Really love the use of color and form, fun stuff.

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Amazing Music

Extremely Slow Guitar Playing Sounds Like a Violin When Sped Up

May 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

Here’s a clever but of instrumentation and video work. Musician Steve-san Onotera, aka the Samurai Guitarist, recorded himself playing the Beatles’ Here Comes the Sun at an excruciatingly slow pace—almost 30 minutes to play the song once. He then sped the recording up 20 times and played it back, creating a sound that could easily be mistaken for some kind of modulated violin. Shooting during a sunrise was a nice touch. (via Kottke)

 

 



Design

A Wood Turned Bamboo Death Star by Frank Howarth

May 4, 2016

Christopher Jobson

In this new timelapse video, woodworker Frank Howarth (previously) demonstrates how he designed and constructed a replica of the Star Wars’ Death Star out of bamboo. The Portland-based designer, who also has a degree in architecture from Harvard, shares much of his behind-the-scenes processes through his wildly popular YouTube channel. I expected to skip through different parts of the video, but Howarth has an uncanny ability to film himself working, it really is worth watching the whole thing straight through. Even the sound design is great.

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Photography

A Photographer’s Digital Journey to Produce a Lake of Shattered Mirrors

April 8, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

"Impact" by Erik Johansson, image provided by artist.

“Impact” by Erik Johansson, image provided by artist.

Swedish photographer Erik Johansson had a vision for a digital photograph of a lake shattering like a mirror, an image he wanted to produce as accurately as possible. To achieve this effect for Impact, Johansson bought 17 square meters of mirrors, found a boat and a model, and posed all three in a stone pit until he got the best shot for the final image. Several months of planning, shooting, and editing later and he has an entire video that documents the tasks that lie far beyond the many hours he spent in Photoshop.

For this personal project Johansson shot on a Hasselblad H5D-40, edited on a Eizo CG318-4k monitor with Adobe Photoshop, and filmed the entire process with a 4k GoPro. You can see more of Johansson’s behind-the-scenes videos and finished images on his Instagram and Youtube channel. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Animation

Wrapped: A Stunning Animated Time-lapse that Depicts Powerful Plants Reclaiming New York

April 5, 2016

Christopher Jobson

There have been countless films set against the backdrop of a post-apocalyptic New York teeming with wildlife and overgrown with plants, both Planet of the Apes and I Am Legend come to mind. In this animated short titled Wrapped from Roman Kaelin, Falko Paeper and Florian Wittmann, we instead see the demise of the city as a vivid time-lapse that blends real footage, CG, and several of its own science fiction twists. The time-lapse begins with the death of a small rat that sets in motion the complete demise of the city’s human-made infrastructure that is quickly razed by super powerful vines. They share about the project:

“Wrapped” is a VFX driven short film by Roman Kälin, Falko Paeper and Florian Wittmann that combines Time Lapse Photography with CG to create a new reality. The short explores the effects of time and change focusing on the the world’s seemingly never ending cycles. The deterioration of one is the foundation for another. This fact takes on new dimensions when the unexpected forces of nature clash with the existing structures of our civilization.

Wrapped was originally released in 2014 and was screened at over 100 festivals picking up tons of accolades along the way. The film was made viewable online for the first time ever today. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

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Amazing Science

Starting With the Earth as a Marble, This Is the First Timelapse of the Solar System to Scale

September 17, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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When looking in a science textbook or a toy mobile of the solar system, it’s easy to depict the sun, planets and moon to scale in comparison to each other. What’s not so easy to visually comprehend the staggering distance that separates each planet on its individual orbit around the sun. Filmmakers Alex Gorosh and Wylie Overstreet challenged themselves to build such a model and the result is this fascinating short film To Scale.

Starting with the Earth as the size of a marble, it turns out you need an area about 7 miles (11.2km) to squeeze in the orbit of the outermost planet, Neptune. The team used glass spheres lit by LEDs and some GPS calculations to map out the solar system on the dry bed of the Black Rock Desert in Nevada. Once nighttime arrived they shot a timelapse from a nearby mountain that accurately reflects the distance of each orbital path at a scale of roughly 1:847,638,000. Amazing.

If you have more questions about how they did it, here’s a brief making of clip. (via Colossal Submissions)

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When standing next to the Earth in the scale model, the orb representing the sun appears exactly the same size as the actual sun.