Tag Archives: timelapse

Atom-Lapse: A Timelapse of André Waterkeyn’s Iconic Atomium Building

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Designed by engineer André Waterkeyn for the 1958 World’s Fair in Brussels, Belgium, Atomium is a 102m (335 ft) tall model of a unit cell of an iron crystal (each sphere representing an atom) enlarged 165 billion times. Filmmaker Richard Bently was allowed access to shoot this great exterior and interior timelapse of the building which is comprised of 27 sequences filmed over five nights and two days. (via Vimeo)

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Speed Painting Timelapse by Lora Zombie

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Lora Zombie is a self-taught artist from Russia who mixes street art and grunge influences in her watercolor paintings. This recent timelapse video shows the creation of a new work called Coffee and Milk. Music by Youth Lagoon.

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Timelapse Video of Hundreds of Snails Tagged with LEDs at Night

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As part of ongoing research into the transmission of lungworm from snails to dogs, a team of researchers from the Ecology department at the University of Exeter lead by Dr. Dave Hodgson created an experiment to track the movement of snails through a garden at night. The team tagged hundreds of live snails with an array of LEDs and UV paint and then tracked their speed and patterns of movement at night. Apparently lungworm infections are potentially fatal in dogs and nobody is exactly sure how the organisms make the leap from snails to dogs in the first place, though the assumption is accidental ingestion. You can watch the awesome timelapse of glow-in-the-dark snails starting around 2:15 in the video above, or watch the entire clip here. Be Lungworm Aware! (via Hungeree)

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The Earth’s Seasonal “Heartbeat” as Seen from Space

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We all know that as the seasons change on Earth, temperatures rise and fall, plants grow or die, ice forms or melts away. Perhaps nobody is more aware of this than NASA’s Visible Earth team who provide a vast catalog of images of our home planet as seen from space. Last month designer, cartographer, and dataviz expert John Nelson download a sequence of twelve cloud-free satellite imagery mosaics of Earth, one from each month, and then created a number of vivid animated gifs showing the seasonal changes in vegetation and land ice around the world.

Despite having encountered numerous seasonal timelapse videos shot here on Earth, this is the first time I’ve ever seen anything like this visualized on such a large scale from space. It really looks like a heartbeat or the action of breathing. Read more over on Nelson’s blog, or see a much larger version of the gif here. (via Co.Design)

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The Passage of Time Captured in Layered Landscape Collages by Fong Qi Wei

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Time can be a difficult variable to visually convey in still photography, both the length of time an exposure takes or a series of photos meant to depict the passage of time can be somewhat ambiguous without a written explanation. In his latest series, Time is a dimension, Singapore-based photographer Fong Qi Wei (previously) explores just that idea by shooting landscapes from a stationary position over a 2-4 hour period and then digitally slicing the images to create a layered collage. He shoots at sunset or sunrise to obtain a wide variation in light and then carefully cuts each image to reveal incremental timeframes. He explains:

The basic structure of a landscape is present in every piece. But each panel or concentric layer shows a different slice of time, which is related to the adjacent panel/layer. The transition from daytime to night is gradual and noticeable in every piece, but would not be something you expect to see in a still image.

Similarly, our experience of a scene is more than a snapshot. We often remember a sequence of events rather than a still frame full of details. In this series, I strive to capture both details and also a sequence of time in a single 2 dimensional canvas. I hope it gives you pause and reconsider what you experience versus what you shoot with your next camera phone.

You can see many more examples on his website, and read more about his process right here.

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Mirror City: A Kaleidoscopic Timelapse of Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Vegas and L.A.

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Mirror City is the latest video from photographer and filmmaker Michael Shainblum that takes time-lapse footage of Chicago, San Francisco, San Diego, Las Vegas and Los Angeles and runs it through a constantly shifting kaleidoscopic pattern of mirrors. Shainblum says of the piece took about four months to edit and adds:

These clips were all processed from their original form, into the kaleidoscopic visuals that you see in this video. Many people visit these large cities every day, and all of these places have been shot and filmed, but I wanted to emulate these urban landscapes in a way that nobody has even seen before. I wanted to put man-made geometric shapes, mixed with elements of color and movement to create less of a structured video, and more of a plethora of visual stimulation.

And a plethora of visual stimulation it is indeed. The fun part for me was trying to recognize all of the different cities as the patterns become more abstract and chaotic. Amazing editing. I definitely suggest watching it full-screen with HD turned on. (via vimeo)

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Adrift: A Two-Year Oddessy Through the San Francisco Fog by Simon Christen

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Shot over a period of two years by filmmaker Simon Christen, Adrift is “a love letter to the fog of the San Francisco Bay Area.” For the last two years Christen woke up at 5am and pored over weather data, satellite photos, and online webcams to determine whether or not the conditions were right to make the 45 minute drive to the Marin Headlands to shoot. Many days the filming was a bust, but occasionally the weather, light and filming conditions would align perfectly and he would manage to capture a few seconds of usable (and extraordinary) footage.

The resulting time-lapse film is nothing short of astounding. The puffy fog flows, undulates and seemingly swallows parts of the city in its perpetual state of motion. You might recognize Christen’s work from his other outstanding time-lapse, The Unseen Sea, from about three years ago.

You can see much more of the photographer’s work over on 500px. Adrift is set to music by The Album Leaf and you can download it for free here. (via vimeo)

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