treehouses

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Design

A Bird’s Nest Tearoom Perched Atop a 300-Year-Old Camphor Tree in Japan

August 17, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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All photos by Koji Fujii for Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP

Architect Hiroshi Nakamura had always been intrigued by how some crows utilize found coat hangers as a structural element in their nests. With this idea in mind, a unique opportunity presented itself when treehouse builder Takashi Kobayashi contacted him with an unusual site for a tearoom: 10 meters above the ground in a 300-year-old cinnamomum camphora tree growing precariously on the side of a mountain that overlooks the ocean in Shizuoka Prefecture, Japan. Using the coat hangers as a starting point he designed the Bird’s Nest Atami Tearoom using a variety of minimally invasive construction techniques meant to protect the integrity of the tree.

“Hangers are not only durable but also highly elastic, and they offer more hooks to connect than branches and hence are easier to assemble,” he shares. “Crows, flying deftly across the dichotomy of natural and artificial, are creating a functional and comfortable environment.” Thus the tearoom became a lightweight scaffold-type structure that works in harmony with the trees branches instead of being directly anchored to it. From Nakamura’s notes on the project:

For the foundation, we carefully inserted pier type foundations between the roots in order to avoid the use of concrete and large-scale excavation. Using the structure itself as scaffolding, we assembled it by avoiding the branches as birds create their nest, adding or taking out components based on structural analysis. We mortared the room interior to be like a swallow’s nest. The design leaves open the possibility for visitors to experience nest building by picking up branches from the mountain side and fitting them into walls inside.

The tearoom is part of the KAI Atami resort, and you can see more views both inside and out on the Hiroshi Nakamura & NAP website. Please take me with you. (via ARCHatlas)

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Art Design

Miniature Treehouse Sculptures Built Around Houseplants by Jedediah Voltz

April 12, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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LA-based artist Jedediah Corwyn Voltz constructs miniature treehouses wrapped around common houseplants or bonsai trees in his new sculptural series titled Somewhere Small. Voltz relies on over a decade of commercial prop making for film and other projects to craft each structure from scratch using small bits of wood, silk fabric, miniature artworks, and semi precious stones that are hidden throughout. To-date he’s produced some 25 little habitats that resemble everything from tiny watchtowers in secluded forests, to large bustling windmills or water wheels.

The pieces you see here will be on view at Virgil Normal in LA starting April 23. (thnx, jake!)

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Design

Camp in the Air: New Suspended Treehouse Tents and Hammocks Designed by Tentsile

June 26, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Since we last mentioned Tensile tents around this time last year, the company has unveiled several new models of their fantastic suspended tent systems. There’s a small hammock for three that can be layered into a multi-tiered treehouse, a 2-layer tree tent, and a massive communal tent system designed to hold 6 people high in the air. Tentsile was invented by designers Alex Shirley-Smith and Kirk Kirchev in 2012 and have since taken the camping world by storm, opening their own factory and picking up an ISPO design award. You can see plenty more here.

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Design

Vertical Forest: An Urban Treehouse That Protect Residents from Air and Noise Pollution

March 10, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

A potted forest of trees and branching steel beams disguise this 5-story apartment building in Turin, Italy. Designed by Luciano Pia, 25 Verde brings plants up off the ground in an attempt to evade Turin’s homogeneous urban scene and integrate life into the facade of the residential building.

The undulating structure creates a transition from outdoors to in, holding 150 trees that absorb close to 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour. This natural absorption brings pollution protection to its residents, helping to eliminate harmful gasses caused by cars and harsh sounds from the bustling streets outside. The trees’ seasonal progression also creates the ideal microclimate inside the building, steadying temperature extremes during the cold and warmer months. The plants’ full foliage block rays of sun during the summer while letting in warm light during the winter.

The building holds 63 units, each benefiting from the terraces and vegetation just beyond their windows and walls. Each species of plant has been chosen purposefully from deciduous plant life in Turin to provide the highest variety of color, foliage, and blooming. This innovative design provides a childlike dream while also instilling real world benefits to those who live in this urban treehouse. (via Divisare)

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Luciano Pia

© Luciano Pia

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Art Design

An Illuminated Woven Willow Tree House by Tom Hare

September 26, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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UK sculptor Tom Hare works primarily with willow branches to create large organic sculptures that borrow from the same techniques used in basket making. One of his most recent commissions was a giant egg-like treehouse installed in a cherry tree at a private residence. Lit from the inside, the complexity of the structure is highlighted against the sky, making it look a bit more like a spaceship than a treehouse. You can see more of Hare’s work on his Tumblr. Photos by Daniel Castledine. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design

A Trio of Dreamy Treehouses Linked by Bridges

August 15, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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All photos © Lindsay Appel for My Cool Shed

Architect and environmentalist Peter Bahouth designed and built this beautiful trio of treehouses linked by bridges in an Atlanta forest, which also happens to be his backyard. Inspired by the treehouses and adventures of his youth, the idea was to create a sort of fort for grown-ups. The three houses dubbed “Mind,” “Body,” and “Spirit,” include a living room and bedroom with a special bed that slides out for an improved view of the forest below. The photos here were taken for Jane Field-Lewis’ book My Cool Shed, provided courtesy photographer Lindsay Appel. (via iGNANT, CJ Who)
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Design

Sleep in the Trees Inside a Portable Suspended Treehouse by Tentsile

June 27, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Created by UK inventor Alex Shirley-Smith, Tentsile is an ingenious portable suspended treehouse that installs much like a hammock while offering the convenience of a multi-person tent. Simply locate any three anchor points and install the tent above ground where you’re immediately clear of threats from rain and a plethora of ground-based creepy crawly things.

The Tentsile system was first conceived by Shirley-Smith in 2010 and after an early concept went absurdly viral around the web in 2012 the company hired another designer, Kirk Kirchev. The team worked through a series of 14 prototypes before finally releasing their first production model, the Tentsile Stingray, at the end of last year. You can learn more about this backpackable treehouse over on their website. (via My Modern Met, This Isn’t Happiness)

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