Tag Archives: trees

Vertical Forest: An Urban Treehouse That Protect Residents from Air and Noise Pollution

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

A potted forest of trees and branching steel beams disguise this 5-story apartment building in Turin, Italy. Designed by Luciano Pia, 25 Verde brings plants up off the ground in an attempt to evade Turin’s homogeneous urban scene and integrate life into the facade of the residential building.

The undulating structure creates a transition from outdoors to in, holding 150 trees that absorb close to 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour. This natural absorption brings pollution protection to its residents, helping to eliminate harmful gasses caused by cars and harsh sounds from the bustling streets outside. The trees’ seasonal progression also creates the ideal microclimate inside the building, steadying temperature extremes during the cold and warmer months. The plants’ full foliage block rays of sun during the summer while letting in warm light during the winter.

The building holds 63 units, each benefiting from the terraces and vegetation just beyond their windows and walls. Each species of plant has been chosen purposefully from deciduous plant life in Turin to provide the highest variety of color, foliage, and blooming. This innovative design provides a childlike dream while also instilling real world benefits to those who live in this urban treehouse. (via Divisare)

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Luciano Pia

© Luciano Pia

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

© Beppe Giardino

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Handmade Resin Bangles Embedded with Flowers and Bark

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Hand-made in Coos Bay, Oregon, these resin bangles are infused with plants, leaves, flowers, shells, and strips of bark. Much of what you see here is available through Faerie and dozens of additional pieces are available through Etsy. (via Crafty Allegieance)

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Giant Tree Sculpture Cast from the Trunk of a 140-Year-Old Hemlock

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Photo by John Grade

Recently unveiled at the MadArt space in Seattle, Middle Fork is the lastest sculptural work by artist John Grade who worked with countless volunteers to realize this enormous scale mold of a 140-year-old tree.

The process began a year ago when Grade and a crew of assistants scaled a Western Hemlock tree in North Bend, Washington with help of a team of arborists. At nearly 90 feet in the air they created sectional plaster molds of the living tree which were carefully lowered and transported back to the MadArt space over a period of two weeks. Over the next 12 months, hundreds of volunteers (some who walked in right off the streets) helped to create a hollow sculpture of the tree using hundreds of thousands of small wood blocks. The final piece was carefully sanded down and is now suspended in the gallery. Watch the video below to see how it all came together.

Middle Fork is the first exhibition at the new MadArt space in Seattle and will be on view through April 25th before it goes on tour to galleries and art fairs around the U.S. In two years the pieces will be transported to the base of the living tree from which the mold was taken where they will decay and disintegrate back into the ground.

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Photo by John Grade

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Photo by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photos by John Grade

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Photo by Tim Detweiler

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Photo by Katie Wood

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Ancient Trees: Beth Moon’s 14-Year Quest to Photograph the World’s Most Majestic Trees

Heart of the Dragon

Criss-crossing the world with stops on almost every continent, San Francisco-based photographer Beth Moon spent the last 14 years seeking out some of the largest, rarest, and oldest trees on Earth to capture with her camera. Moon develops her exhibition prints with a platinum/palladium process, an extremely labor-intensive and rare practice resulting in prints with tremendous tonal range that are durable enough to rival the longitivity of her subjects, potentially lasting thousands of years. Moon’s collected work of 60 duotone prints were recently published in a new book titled Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time. From Abbeville Press:

This handsome volume presents sixty of Moon’s finest tree portraits as full-page duotone plates. The pictured trees include the tangled, hollow-trunked yews—some more than a thousand years old—that grow in English churchyards; the baobabs of Madagascar, called “upside-down trees” because of the curious disproportion of their giant trunks and modest branches; and the fantastical dragon’s-blood trees, red-sapped and umbrella-shaped, that grow only on the island of Socotra, off the Horn of Africa.

Moon is currently working on a new series of trees photographed by starlight called Diamond Nights. (via Huffington Post)

Avenue of the Baobabs

Bowthorpe Oak copy

Bufflesdrift Baobab 2-2 copy

Croft Chestnut 1 copy

Desert Rose (Wadi Fa Lang) copy

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Sentinels Neg 2014

Wakehurst Yews

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A Tree of 511 Interconnected Pliers Carved from a Single Block of Wood by Ernest Warther

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Photo by Paul & Margery Zeller

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Photo by Paul & Margery Zeller

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Photo by SneakinDeacon

As the story goes, Ernest “Mooney” Warther was a boy growing up in Ohio when he encountered a man who taught him how to carve a pair of working pliers from a single piece of wood—using just 10 cuts. Whether it was that single epiphany, or the machinations of his incredibly inquisitive mind, Warther would quickly become one of this most notable wood carvers in America.

Warther’s most significant carving before he changed his focus almost exclusively to locomotives, was a tree created from 511 interconnected pliers using the same technique he learned as a child. The piece required some 31,000 cuts and each branch can fully articulate like a functional pair of pliers all the way down to the base of the trunk. Watch the video above to see Warther’s son David demonstrating the technique (seriously, it’s almost miraculous at the end, well worth a quick watch).

If you want to see more of Warther’s work, there’s an entire museum in Ohio where you can also view is wife Frieda’s meticulously organized collection of 100,000 buttons. (via Atlas Obscura)

Update: An earlier version of this post stated the person in the video above is Ernest, when in fact it’s his son, David. (thnx, Natalia!)

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Wind-Swept Frost Blankets Tree Trunks in a Czech Forest

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Photographer Jan Bainar was hiking through the Beskydy Mountains last week, a range that forms the border between Slovakia and the Czech Republic, when he stumbled onto something spectacular. Low temperatures, high winds, and a bit of precipitation caused frost to form on one side of the tree trunks through the entire forest. Any meteorologists want to chime in on this? Is this the same thing as hoar frost or frost flowers? Something different? You can see more of Bainar’s landscape photography over on 500px. Photo courtesy the photographer.

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Dense Wire Tree Sculptures by Clive Maddison

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Using nothing but wire, sculptor Clive Madison creates tangled trees that grow from wooden bases into dense clusters of leaves and branches. Each piece is made by hand without glue or solder, using single strands of wire that start at the base and terminate at the top. You can see many more pieces on his website, and several are available through Lee Champman Gallery. (via Ghost in the Machine)

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