Tag Archives: vegetables

The Mystical Origins of Fruit and Vegetables Photographed by Maciek Jasik 


Although it’s recommended we eat five to seven servings of fruits and vegetables daily, many are unaware of the origins, mythology, and symbolism many of our favorite healthy foods hold. Several of the most common vegetables took thousands of years to cultivate, the watermelon was originally known for being bland and buried with pharaohs as a water source in the afterlife, and Buddha considered the pomegranate one of the three most blessed fruits.

Photographer Maciek Jasik is fascinated by the tales behind fruits and vegetables and seeks to reintroduce these mystical qualities back into their being through his eerie depictions of squash, pineapples, horned melons, and others. “The Secret Lives of Fruits and Vegetables” aims to bring back the characteristics “that have been lost amidst the clamor of nutritional statistics,” says Jasik. “Each offers its own indelible powers beyond our narrow habits of thought.”

Jasik achieves this by his use of color and deeply-hued smoke bombs, poking small holes within his subjects to make the smoke subtly waft or flood from the inside. Not sticking to a particular color scheme, the images all convey vastly different moods, an eggplant appearing to be involved in a dark alchemical experiment as the pineapple looks like it is straight from an upbeat advertising shoot.

You can see more vegetative smoke-filled photographs from the NYC-based photographer on his Tumblr and Instagram.











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A Variety of Unprocessed Foods Cut into Uncannily Precise 2.5cm Cubes by Lernert & Sander 


In 2014, Dutch newspaper De Volkskrant contacted conceptual design studio Lernert & Sander to create a piece for a special documentary photography issue about food. Lernert & Sander responded with this somewhat miraculous photo of 98 unprocessed foods cut into extremely precise 2.5cm cubes aligned on a staggered grid. Looking at the shot it seems practically impossible, but the studio confirms it is indeed the real thing. The photo is available as a limited edition print of 50 copies printed on 40 x 50cm baryta paper signed by the artists for about €500. You can learn more on their website. (via iGNANT)





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Artist Paints Common Foods to Disguise them as Other Foods 







In this fun series of painted objects titled “It’s not what it seems” by artist Hikaru Cho, common foods are transformed with deftly applied acrylic paints to look like other foods. A banana is turned into a near photo-realistic cucumber, a tomato becomes a tangerine, and even an egg is made into a glistening eggplant. These are actually some of Cho’s “tamer” artworks, as she’s used these same skills with a paintbrush to alter human faces and body parts by adding extra eyes, zippers and mouths. (via Visual News)

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Graft Tableware: Biodegradable Utensils that Look Like Vegetables 





For her diploma project at the École cantonale d’art de Lausanne in Switzerland, product designer Qiyun Deng created a beautiful set of utensils and and serving bowls made from bioplastic PLA, a material most often derived from vegetable fats, oils, or starches. Titled Graft, the delicately crafted design of each piece serves as a reminder of the biodegradable materials used to create them: a celery stem becomes a handle for a fork, a stalk of fennel becomes a knife, a slender carrot a spoon.

While Graft is just a concept at this point, I imagine these could sell extraordinarily well given the right price. But could you actually bring yourself to toss such a beautifully designed object in the compost bin? Learn more over on Deng’s website. (via THEmag)

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A Colorful Winter: Organized Fruits and Vegetables Photographed by Florent Tanet 











A Colorful Winter is a new series of works by photographer Florent Tanet currently on display at the famous Le Bon Marché department store in Paris through February 16th. The clever arrangements of common fruits and vegetables against pastel backdrops play with color, scale, and shape creating whimsical still lifes meant to act as a reprieve from a dreary winter. If you liked this also check out the work of Sarah Illenberger or Sakir Gökçebag. Also don’t miss Carl and Evelina’s Homage to Calder. You can see much more Tanet’s work on his website. (via ignant)

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The Geometric Food Art of Sakir Gökçebag 

And I have trouble cutting a sandwich on a perfect diagonal for my son. From watermelons to green beans and apples to pomegranates, Turkish photographer Sakir Gökçebag slices common fruits and veggies to create striking geometric arrangements. To clarify: the photos you see here haven’t been digitally manipulated but are instead the result of meticulously precise cutting worthy of a surgeon. If you want to see more I strongly urge you to check out the installations and photography projects on his website. (via designboom)

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