Tag Archives: video

Timelapse of the Amish raising a giant barn in under 10 hours 

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Ohio resident Scott Miller shot this timelapse video earlier this year of dozens of Amish men raising a barn. The entire construction cycle takes place between 7am and 5pm—with at least an hour for lunch—and yet the bulk of the work is done by the end of the day. Amazing to see how incredibly precise the entire endeavor is. (via Sploid)

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Tiny Shrimp-like Organisms Try to Illuminate the Insides of Fish That Eat Them 

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No, these aren’t light vomiting fish, though you would be forgiven for thinking so because that’s exactly what it looks like. What you’re seeing is the defense mechanism of a tiny crustacean called an ostracod, a shrimp-like organism about 1mm in size that some fish accidentally eat while hunting for plankton. When eaten by a translucent cardinalfish, the ostracod immediately releases a bioluminescent chemical in an attempt to illuminate the fish from the inside, making it immediately identifiable to predators. WHAT. Not wanting to be eaten, the cardinalfish immediately spits out the ostracod, resulting in little underwater fish fireworks. What an incredible game of evolutionary cat and mouse. The clip above is from a new show on BBC Two called Super Senses. If you’re in the UK you can watch it online in HD for a few more days. (via For Science Sake)

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Eye Know: A Kaleidoscopic Journey through the Streets of Tokyo at Night 

This independent film project from filmmaker Hiroshi Kondo starts as a fairly typical time-lapse journey through highways surrounding Tokyo, but quickly morphs into something entirely different. Kondo makes use of lampposts and other nighttime light sources to create this dazzling, kaleidoscopic explosion of color and motion set to music by Ayako Taniguchi.

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Ornate Painted Dragons Based on a Single Giant Brush Stroke 

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One of the most common feelings I get when watching an artist working is “oh, that looks easy.” After all, the materials and method are all right in front of you: paint or ink, a paint brush or pen, and a hand that moves deftly across a canvas. What goes completely unseen of course are the years upon years of practice, the trials and failures, and the possession of innate talent. A great example of this are these Japanese dragon paintings that are rendered almost completely with a single stroke of paint.

According to Japanese culture blog Iromegane, the paintings are called Hitofude Ryuu (Dragon with one stroke), and the ones shown here originate from a small studio called Kousyuuya in Nikko, Japan. The studio has seen four generations of master painters who have been creating these stylized dragons for decades.

The process involves carefully painting an ornate dragon head with various flourishes, and then finishing the piece using a giant sumi brush in a carefully orchestrated stroke. The process has much in common with both ink wash painting and calligraphy, and similar to letterforms, the images are often repeated. From the videos you can see certain designs are reused in different colors or with added details. All the videos here start at the fun part where the torso is painted, but you can rewind them a bit to see the creation of the entire painting. (via Cineraria, Iromegane)

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Art and Craft: A Documentary about Mark Landis, One of the Most Prolific Art Forgers in U.S. History 

Art and Craft is a new feature documentary about art forger Mark Landis (previously) who is arguably one of the most prolific art forgers in U.S. history, having tricked over 60 museums in 20 states into believing his masterfully created replicas are authentic artworks. The catch: so far, it appears Landis, who has been diagnosed as schizophrenic, has yet to commit a crime. While he’s caused headaches, confusion, and multi-year investigations, he has never sought to benefit or profit from his forgeries in any way. Instead, he enjoys the performative act of pretending to be a philanthropist who makes donations of obscure artwork to art institutions, many of which unknowingly exhibited the fakes, allowing Landis the secret thrill of seeing his work on display.

Art and Craft opens next month in a select number of theaters. (via Coudal)

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