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Art

Monumental Pastel Drawings of Endangered Icebergs by Zaria Forman

September 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4" (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4″ (In progress), Soft Pastel on paper, 84″ x 144”, 2016

Zaria Forman (previously here and here) creates incredibly realistic drawings of Antarctica’s icebergs, producing large pastel works that capture the sculptural beauty of the quickly shrinking forms. This past winter, the artist had the opportunity to be side-by-side with the the towering ice shelfs, observing their magnitude aboard the National Geographic Explorer during a four week art residency.

The residency gave her the opportunity to further embody the natural formations, providing a new perspective to create her large-scale drawings.

“Many of us are intellectually aware that climate change is our greatest global challenge, and yet the problem may feel abstract, the imperiled landscapes remote,” says Forman. “I hope my drawings make Antarctica’s fragility visceral to the viewer, emulating the overpowering experience of being beside a glacier.”

Forman has a solo exhibition of her work titled Antarctica opening at Winston Wächter gallery in Seattle on September 9 and running through November 4, 2017. You can watch a timelapse of Forman completing her drawing Whale Bay, Antarctica no.4  in the video below. (via Juxtapoz)

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2," Soft pastel on paper, 50" x 75", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 2,” Soft pastel on paper, 50″ x 75″, 2016

"Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2016

“Whale Bay, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2016

"Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1," Soft Pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“Cierva Cove, Antarctica no. 1,” Soft Pastel on paper, 60″ x 90″, 2017

"Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1," Soft pastel on paper, 84" x 144", 2016

“Risting Glacier, South Georgia no. 1,” Soft pastel on paper, 84″ x 144″, 2016

“Lemaire Channel, Antarctica,” Soft pastel on paper, 44″ x 60″, 2015

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper," 72" x 72", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no. 1, Soft Pastel on paper,” 72″ x 72″, 2017

"B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2" (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60" x 90", 2017

“B-15Y Iceberg, Antarctica no.2″ (In progress), Soft pastel on paper, 60″ x 90”, 2017

 

 



Art

A Turbulent Black Sea Fills a Three-Story Wall in Kiev, Ukraine

August 10, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

London-born and Cape Town-based artist Jake Aikman paints scenes that aim to capture the mysterious nature of environments at the edge of civilization, producing dramatic seascapes and dense patches of tropical forests in his oil paintings. His latest work moves from canvas to wall, upscaling his practice for the first time to produce a three-story tall mural of a stormy Black Sea. The two-layer public painting was produced for Art United Us over nine days last month in Kiev, Ukraine. You can see more of Aikman’s work on his Instagram and through SMAC Gallery where he is represented. (via Brooklyn Street Art)

 

 



Art

A Human-Shaped Pool Reflects the Sky Over Tbilisi by Icy & Sot

June 4, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Brooklyn-based artist duo Icy & Sot were recently in Tbilisi, Georgia where they installed this temporary piece titled “Nature’s Reflection” as part of Art-Villa Garikula. You can follow more of their recent work on Instagram, and also check out their recent book Let Her be Free that features over a decade of stencil work and street installations.

 

 



Art History

The Vanishing Stepwells of India: A New Book by Victoria Lautman Documents the Fading Relics of Subterranean Wells

March 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Van Talab Baoli. Amer, Rajasthan. c. 1600/19th Century.

Scattered across India’s vast landscape of ancient architecture including temples, mosques, and palaces are an often overlooked relic of historic infrastructure called stepwells. These subterranean buildings, once numbered in the thousands, were originally dug into the landscape so residents could easily access water. Over time, stepwells grew increasingly elaborate in their construction, morphing from modest rock-cut holes into fully functional Hindu temples with ornate columns, stairwells, and shrines. Each well now serves as a fading structural fingerprint, diverse and unique as the communities that designed and built them.

Chicago journalist Victoria Lautman first peeked over the edge of a stepwell some 30 years ago and was immediately transfixed at the idea of staring down into an architectural wonder as opposed to looking up. She has since dedicated much of the last five years criss-crossing India over several years to locate and photograph as many wells as possible. We first mentioned Lautman’s discoveries back in 2015, after which she resumed trips to India to locate an additional 60 wells, bringing the grand total to over 200 sites she’s personally visited and documented.

“Descending into the earth is a profound experience, one in which sweltering heat turns to enveloping cool, and noises become hushed,” she writes about encountering the wells.

After centuries of neglect some stepwells are in perilous condition or have vanished altogether, while others have been thoughtfully maintained by surrounding communities or governments who recognize their significance and possess the will (and funding) to restore them. In an attempt to preserve their legacy, Lautman has gathered a visual tour of 75 of the more unique and interesting wells in a new book titled The Vanishing Stepwells of India. The book includes not only her original photography, but also her impressions about each well and the precise GPS coordinates of their locations.

It remains to be seen if the renewed interest in stepwells, as well as the accompanying tourist dollars, will drive the change to save them. “In the long-run,” Lautman tells Colossal, “I think the most helpful thing for stepwells is simply acknowledging their existence in history and guidebooks, through classes and specialized tours, and finally just seeing them up close, embedded in the landscape.” Another way to explore the wells is through the Atlas of Stepwells, a website where enthusiasts can share their own discoveries.

The Vanishing Stepwells of India with a foreword by Divay Gupta, is published by Merrell and is available now.

Ramkund. Bhuj, Gujarat. Mid-18th Century (c. 700 CE).

Mukundpura Baoli. Mukundpura, Haryana c. 1650.

Ujala Baoli Mandu. Madhya Pradesh. Late 15th/early 16th century.

Chand Baori. Abhaneri, Rajasthan. c. 800 ce/18th Century.

Batris Kotha Vav. Kaoadvanj, Gujarat c. 1120.

Dada Harir Vav. Asarwa. c. 1499

Navghan Kuvo. Junagadh, Gujarat. 4th/6th/Mid-11th Century.

 

 



Photography

Aqueous Roses and Liquid Blooms Photographed by Mark Mawson

March 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

In his latest photographic series, London-based photographer Mark Mawson takes us underwater to the epicenter of swirling vortexes and explosions of colorful dye. Each image captures a brief split-second moment requiring extreme precision and choreography to create a perfect swirl or bloom. You can follow more of photographic and video work on Instagram and see more from “Flowers and Swirls” on his website.

 

 



Design

Drippy Calligraphy Experiments by Seb Lester

February 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

A video posted by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

Calligraphy master Seb Lester (previously) has been sharing quick videos of watery handwriting experiments on his Instagram account. Each word or phrase begins with a scribble of water or an array of droplets to which he then uses a dropper to apply color. Seen here are some highlights but it hardly even scratches the surface. Much more here. (via Quipsologies)

A video posted by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

A video posted by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

A video posted by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

A video posted by Seb Lester (@seblester) on

 

 



Photography

New Light Paintings That Capture the Movement of Kayaking and Canoeing by Stephen Orlando

December 14, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Stephen Orlando (previously here and here) captures traces of movement through time, securing LED lights to rowing paddles and even violin bows. The result is a technicolor landscape—curved patterns hovering just above the water’s edge in his newest group of lake and ocean-side imagery. Recently the Canadian-based photographer has produced photos in his home province of Ontario, as well as around Newfoundland and next to Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s Floating Piers this summer in Italy. You can see more of Orlando’s time-based light experiments on his Instagram and Facebook.

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A Colossal

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Animal Multi-Tool