Tag Archives: watercolor

Geometric Watercolors by Artist Jacob Van Loon 

Recent Colorado transplant Jacob van Loon creates geometric watercolors that seem to visually reference abstract architectural renderings. The colors in his works look as if they have bled beyond recognition of a specific site or landmark, yet still retain a strict set of dense and chaotic lines. The paintings trap specific colors in the boxes of their grid-like surface, yet also allow some to traverse throughout the work, alternating between clean and hazy sections of muted blues and bright oranges.

“By the time I have a final sketch, the layers of primer are caked up and full of valleys and ridges created by broad brush strokes,” van Loon told The Creator’s Project. “When I’m ready for color, it’s not just about pragmatically filling in the spaces, it’s about putting paint down, letting it travel in the valleys and ridges, and seeing where and how it all comes to rest.”

Last year van Loon was commissioned by the band Explosions in the Sky and Temporary Residence Ltd to create the cover art for their album The Wilderness. A video of the making of the work titled 8th and Main can be see above, and final images of the work below. Van Loon’s work will be included in the upcoming group exhibition “How High” at Left Field in San Luis Obispo, CA, and you can see more of his gridded watercolor works on his Instagram and Behance.

jacob-1

“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

jacob-9

“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

jacob-3

“8th & Main” (2015), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 29″ x 29″ x 2″ Client: Explosions in the Sky/Temporary Residence Ltd.

jacob-4

“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

jacob-5

“Pershing” (2014), watercolor, acrylic, and graphite on panel, 32″x48″

jacob-6

“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

jacob-7

“Haish” (2015), watercolor and graphite on wood, 22″x30″

jacob-8

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Dreamy New Architectural Watercolors by Artist Sunga Park 

sunga-1

Bangkok-based illustrator and graphic designer Sunga Park embraces the unpredictable nature of watercolors in her drippy depictions of architectural landmarks. In her extensive travels throughout Europe, Park stops to consider the finest details of Gothic cathedrals or the antennae-laden rooftops of residential streets in Croatia, but allows entire paintings to fade away into a wash of ghostly color. The mixture of detailed elements and watery abstraction results in hazy, dreamlike imagery that seems to constantly surprise and intrigue as if lifted directly from a memory. You can follow more of her work on Instagram and on Behance.

sunga-2

sunga-3

sunga-4

sunga-5

sunga-6

sunga-7

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Dreamy New Ink Paintings of Ghostly Felines and Chickens by Endre Penovac 

endre-1

Artist Endre Penovác (previously here and here) depicts mysterious cats and ethereal roosters with a carefully perfected watercolor technique using diluted inks. Instead of trying to control his brushstrokes, Penovac seems to let the medium run amok across the canvas as it bleeds in every direction, and yet even these happy accidents result in precisely rendered paintings. Seen here is a collection of paintings from the last year or so, but you can see more originals and prints on Saatchi Art.

endre-2

endre-78

endre-3

endre-4

endre-5

endre-6

endre-9

endre-10

endre-11

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska 

maja-1

We’ve long enjoyed the work of painter and architect Maja Wronska (previously) who depicts unique vantages of architectural sites through detailed watercolors. Not only does Wrońska capture these buildings in their entirety, but also focuses on the specific details of their construction and environment such as chandeliers that hang within an ancient church, or the pigeons found circling its exterior. These elements are all produced with an eye for how to capture the character of a space rather than just its aesthetic, imbuing her paintings with the rich history found within each location.

Many of her pieces are available as prints and other objects on Society6. You can see more of Wronska’s works and pieces in progress on her Instagram.

maja-10

maja-2

maja-6

maja-3

maja-4

maja-7

maja-8

maja-5

maja-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Architectural Watercolors of a Dreamlike Warsaw by Tytus Brzozowski 

tytus-1

Architect and watercolorist Tytus Brzozowski imagines a dreamlike world where giant structures rest on towering stilts and trains seem to emerge from tunnels in the side of residential buildings. Unusual motifs like dice and teapots dot the landscape (or float through the air), and yet everything seems in its place, a credibility attributed to elements lifted directly from the architecture seen on the streets of Warsaw, Poland. Brzozowski refers to his watercolor paintings as “the city of his dreams,” and just as dreams seem to defy space and time, his paintings bring together elements of the present and past. You can see more of his work on Facebook and many of his pieces are available as prints through Lumarte. (via Colossal Submissions)

tytus-2

tytus-3

tytus-4

tytus-5

tytus-6

tytus-7

tytus-8

tytus-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

NYPL Shares Huge Archive of 180,000 High-Res Public Domain Images Online, Announces ‘Remix Residency’ 

At a small American Legion carnival near Bellows Falls, Vermont. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

At a small American Legion carnival near Bellows Falls, Vermont. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

The New York Public Library just released high-resolution scans of 180,000 public domain images including photographs, etchings, watercolors, sheet music, maps, stereoscopic views, and other images dating back as far as the 11th century. From their press release:

Did you know that more than 180,000 of the items in our Digital Collections are in the public domain? That means everyone has the freedom to enjoy and reuse these materials in almost limitless ways. The Library now makes it possible to download such items in the highest resolution available directly from the Digital Collections website. No permission required. No restrictions on use.

Not only is the NYPL encouraging people to use these public domain images in their personal endeavors without restriction, they’ve also announced the NYPL Labs Remix Residency for “artists, information designers, software developers, data scientists, and journalists.” Selected individuals will have the opportunity to work on-site at the NYPL as part of a paid residency to create work from this near endless resource of imagery. If that sounds interesting to you—which I know it does—you can apply online here.

They’ve also built a fantastic visual search tool that allows you to sort images by genre, date, and even color. Go make something amazing people! (via Kottke)

Soleil couchant. Watercolor, 1875. Félix Bracquemond.

Soleil couchant. Watercolor, 1875. Félix Bracquemond.

Daughter of Mr. Buck Grant, Negro preacher near Woodville, Greene County, Georgia. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

Daughter of Mr. Buck Grant, preacher near Woodville, Greene County, Georgia. Photo by Jack Delano, 1941.

Seventh Avenue looking south from 35th Street, Manhattan. 1935.

Seventh Avenue looking south from 35th Street, Manhattan. 1935.

DINNER TO S & H MANAGERS [held by] SPERRY & HUTCHINSON [at] “WALDORF-ASTORIA, [NEW YORK]” (HOTEL;) 1907.

nypl-4up

portrait

Engraving of Miss O’Neill in the character of Belvidera in the stage production Venice Preserved, Act 3, Scene 1. Engraving. 1814.

Butterfly engravings, 1833 - 1830. Dumont d'Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César.

Butterfly engravings, 1833 – 1830. Dumont d’Urville, Jules-Sébastien-César.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 1 of 61234...»