Tag Archives: waves

New Photographs of Crashing Ocean Waves Frozen in Time by Pierre Carreau

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Fascinated by the mysteries of the ocean his entire life, photographer Pierre Carreau (previously) documents the power and serenity of ocean waves in his now decade-long project AquaViva. After obtaining a business degree and going into IT, Carreau dramatically changed course in 2004 and moved with his family to the Caribbean island of St. Barthélemy where he now photographs waves as an artistic pursuit.

Carreau’s high-speed photos capture waves that appear frozen in time, giving them an almost sculptural appearance. “Water is amazing,” Carreau says. “Basically it has no color, but through reflection and refraction it can possess all of them, the entire spectrum of light.” More from his statement about AquaViva:

Carreau observes that the photographic images of AquaViva may sometimes be perceived as objects rather than as two-dimensional representations. The play of light off the multitude of facets and curves on the water’s surface gives the image a sculptural quality that enhances the sense of stillness and power. This simultaneous depiction of roiling movement and suspended kinetic energy parallels the dual nature of the oceans and of water itself: life-giving and yet dangerous, inviting and yet fearsome, primordial and yet ever-changing and always renewed.

Seen here is a collection of new photos from 2014 mixed with a few earlier shots we had yet to feature on Colossal, and there’s plenty more to see.

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Perspective: Artist Zaria Forman Shares the Inspiration behind Her Large-Scale Pastel Waves and Icebergs

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As part of his ongoing Making Art series, filmmaker Jesse Brass sits down with artist Zaria Forman (previously) who discusses the inspiration and intent behind her giant pastel drawings of icebergs and ocean waves.

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Sheets of Glass Cut into Layered Ocean Waves by Ben Young

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Self-taught artist Ben Young is a man of many exceptional talents from surfing and skateboarding to repairing furniture and working full-time as a qualified boat builder. He’s also spent the last decade exploring the art of sculpting with glass, an endeavor that’s become increasingly rewarding as galleries and collectors have started to take notice.

Using sheet after sheet of carefully cut glass, Young builds both abstract and realistic interpretations of waves and bodies of water, undoubtedly influenced by growing up near the beautiful Bay of Plenty on the northern coast of New Zealand’s North Island. Many people assume his work is made with the help of machines, or maybe even 3D printing, but instead everything is done completely by hand, from his initial sketches on paper to the manual cutting of each glass pane, a process he aptly describes as “a lot of work.”

You can see several more of his glass sculptures over on Tumblr, and in the video above by David Child. Young is represented by Kirra Galleries in Melbourne and the photos above are courtesy Robert Gray Photography and
Zico O’Neill. You can also follow him on Facebook. (via Faith is Torment)

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Internal Landscapes: Sweeping Abstract Oceans by Samantha Keely Smith

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Artist Samantha Keely Smith paints abstract oceanic landscapes that are at once menancing and serene, a clash of light and color that she refers to as “internal landscapes.” Using oil paint, enamel, and shellac, Smith uses an additive and subtractive process by partially destroying her progress several times before completion. This cyclical process, much like the timeless crash of ocean tides against the shore, adds an additional level of texture to her work. She shares in a 2013 interview with NeverLazy Magazine:

My images are not at all real places or even inspired by real places. They are emotional and psychological places. Internal landscapes, if you will. The tidal pull and power of the ocean makes sense to me in terms of expressing these things, and I think that is why some of the work has a feel of water about it. My work speaks of things that are timeless, and I think that for most of us the ocean represents something timeless.

Currently based in New York, Smith generally doesn’t work with galleries but instead interacts directly with collectors. You can see more recent work on Tumblr and Facebook. (via My Modern Met, Incomplete)

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High Speed Sea Foam Photographed by Ger Kelliher

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Back in January, photographer Ger Kelliher snapped this high speed photo of angry sea foam captured on Coomeenole beach in West Kerry, Ireland. The lighting and perfect timing make the water look almost sculptural in quality. If you’re interested, he has the image available as a high resolution download over on Etsy so you can make your own prints.

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The American Dream: A Sand Castle Suburb Consumed by the Ocean

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Masterplan is a installation by designer and artist Chad Wright inspired by his own experiences growing up in a sprawling suburb of Southern California. The piece is meant to juxtapose the playful childhood experience of building sand castles on the beach with his brother, versus the grim, modern-day reality of our current real estate collapse. Learn more over on his website. Photographed by Lynn Kloythanomsup of Architectural Black. (via this isn’t happiness)

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Liquid Sculptures: Powerful Waves Photographed by Pierre Carreau Seem Frozen in Time

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Photographer Pierre Carreau was born in 1972 near Paris surrounded by a family of artists including a photographer, painter and sculptor, all of which would influence his creative upbringing as well as his artistic output. As a child he was always fascinated by the manifestation of waves and the diversity of color, shape, and size found in each of them. Some of his first photography projects involved work for surfing magazines and water sport equipment manufacturers.

Carreau’s work has now moved into fine art as he shoots waves with a variety of high speed cameras using various macro and wide angle lenses, capturing water shapes that appear more sculptural than liquid. These are truly some of the most remarkable wave photos I’ve ever seen and you can see many, many more over on his website. He also has a number of fine art prints available over at Clic Gallery.

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