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Photography

A House Encased in Ice on the Shores of Lake Ontario

March 16, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photos courtesy John Kucko.

Last weekend photographer John Kucko received a tip about a house in Webster, New York that had become encased in ice after a winter storm swept through the area. Arriving on the scene he found what you see here, a resident’s summer home swallowed entirely by wind-swept icicles and sheets of ice. Kucko shares with Colossal that the building rests just 20 feet from the rocky shores of Lake Ontario where winds recorded up to 81mph caused the waves to crash against the small home. You can see a few recent video updates on his Facebook page. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Photography

Ominous Storms Photographed in Black and White by Mitch Dobrowner

September 19, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Regan, North Dakota, 2011

Photographer Mitch Dobrowner travels the U.S. and sets up his camera in front of apocalyptic storms that rise above rural fields in Oklahoma, Kansas, and North Dakota. Inspired by photographers like Minor White and Ansel Adams, he captures breathtaking landscapes that remind us of nature’s raw power by juxtaposing the endless flat plains of the southern and midwest states with dramatic weather formations. Lightning strikes and tornadoes feature heavily in Dobrowner’s black and white images that at times look like moments right out of the first few minutes of the Wizard of Oz.

Dobrowner has exhibited in galleries across the U.S. and internationally since 2005 and is represented by Photo-Eye Gallery in Santa Fe and Kopeikin Gallery in LA. You can see much more of his work on Facebook. (thnx, Laura!)

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Peckham, Oklahoma

Bolton, Kansas

Bolton, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Newkirk, Oklahoma

Syracuse, Kansas

Syracuse, Kansas

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Arcus Cloud

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Vortex Over Field, 2015

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Strata Storm and Bales, 2015

 

 



Amazing Science

A Dramatic Roll Cloud Briefly Overtakes Chicago

August 31, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Last night a cold front rolled through Chicago, and lucky for us art consultant Amy King was on the lakefront and stopped to shoot an amazing 5-second timelapse as a low-hanging roll cloud moved ominously down the shoreline. So, what’s a roll cloud? Meteorologist Cheryl Scott explains:

What is a Roll Cloud and how does it form? It’s a low, horizontal, tube-shaped cloud. It is formed by winds changing speed/direction when the air temperature reverses its state (resulting in warm air on top of cool air). The shear in the atmosphere sets up a rolling motion, think [of a] rolling pin used in a baking.

You can read a bit more about roll clouds—also called an Arcus Cloud—on Wikipedia. (via @kingartcollective)

A video posted by Colossal (@colossal) on

 

 



Photography Science

Photographs of a Microburst Rising Over Phoenix Appear Just Like a Mushroom Cloud

July 21, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Photos by Jerry Ferguson, with help of pilot Andrew Park.

While helicopter pilot Andrew Park was flying over Phoenix this week, photographer Jerry Ferguson captured what appears to be a giant foreboding mushroom cloud hanging over the city. In actuality the scene is a weather cluster called a “microburst,” a phenomenon that occurs when cooled air from a thunderstorm rushes to the ground and spreads over the land at speeds over 100 miles per hour causing a powerful and centralized air current.

Ferguson captured the sight while filming the weather for a local TV station. A timelapse video by Bryan Snider shows the same microburst from Phoenix’s Sky Harbor International Airport, the camera positioned at what looks like just a couple hundred feet from the center of the storm. (via Mashable)

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Photography

A Double Rainbow Over Chicago

July 14, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Chicago had a bout of heavy rain storms yesterday evening and when things started to clear the sky began to glow bright yellow. For a few fleeting moments a pair of rainbows emerged, captured here by Mike Eisenberg who seemed to be at the perfect vantage point.

 

 



Amazing Photography

Pilot Captures Amazing Thunderstorm Photo at 37,000 Feet Over the Pacific Ocean

July 6, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Over the last few years we’ve seen our fair share of storm and lightning photographs, but this shot from Ecuador Airlines pilot Santiago Borja might top them all. Taken from a Boeing 767-300 cockpit at the precise moment of a lightning flash, the image captures a powerful thunderstorm forming above the Pacific Ocean just south of Panama. A difficult shot considering the turbulent weather and near pitch-dark setting.

“I like this photo so much because you can feel the amazing size of the storm and its power,” he tells the Washington Post. “But at the same time it’s wonderful how peacefully you can fly around it in still air without touching it.”

Borja also shared a second thunderstorm photo with Colossal taken in October of last year along the coast of Venezuela. You can see more of his travel and storm photos on Instagram.

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Photo © Santiago Borja, used with permission.

Update: Photographer Kevin O’ Mara shares his own aerial thunderstorm photo taken over Alabama in 2013.

 

 



Art Science

Colorful Basket Weaving Sculptures by Nathalie Miebach Transform Weather Data into Visual Art

March 18, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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“Musical Buoy in Search Towards a New Shore” (2009), all images courtesy of Nathalie Miebach

Nathalie Miebach's colorful sculptures look like children’s toys gone awry, as if the designer inlcuded far too many twists and turns for a child to possibly follow. It would make sense that these twisted routes would throw one off course, as they are modeled from scientific data pulled from wind patterns, often from storms, gales or blizzards. Miebach translates this quantified data into physical forms that mimic the twirling motions of the invisible weather they aim to imitate.

“The method that I use is basket weaving because basket weaving is a very simple three dimensional grid that I can use to translate data with,” said Miebach. “Everything in the sculpture, whether it is a colorful bead, a string, whether it’s a dowel or reed, represents a different data point. Nothing is put on there for purely aesthetic reasons.”

The Boston artist discovered this process while simultaneously taking an astronomy class at Harvard and learning basket weaving as an extracurricular activity. She yearned for a way to physically display the data she was learning about in class, and thus her 3D scientific models were born. In a field where one is not able to see the data they collect, her sculptures give a form to that which was previously only able to be felt, tasted, and smelled.

Not only do her pieces serve as aesthetic objects, but readable sources of concrete data. “It is important for me that these pieces are actually very accurate because I want them to live in the science world as much as in the sculpture or craft world,” said Miebach. “I still want you to be able to read the weather off of these sculptures.”

You can learn more about Miebach’s process while taking a peak inside her studio in the video from Great Big Story below:

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“To Captain Billy Tyne and His Crew” (2015)

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“Hurricane Noel” (2011)

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“The Andrea Gail” (2011)

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“And the Winds Kept Roaring Through the Night” (2011)

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“In the Shadow of a Giant” (2013)

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“Hurricane Noel,” 2011.

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The musical score for “Hurricane Noel.”