Tag Archives: windows

New Architecturally-Inspired Artworks Created From Layers of Laser-Cut Paper by Eric Standley 

Phidala. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Artist Eric Standley (previously here and here) laser cuts sheets of paper, creating intricately patterned forms by stacking the sheets over 100 layers high. The final works reflect classical stained glass windows, and are inspired by geometric patterns found in both Gothic and Islamic architecture. Recently these designs reference fractal geometry, a rhythmic pattern that is self-replicating.

“These rhythms are found at a cosmological scale in the ever-expanding universe, across culture and time in Gothic and Islamic architecture as well as at the profoundly fundamental building blocks of life,” said Standley. “When a DNA braid is viewed from the top-down, the layered double helix rotation abides by the golden ratio (phi). Waves along the braid conceal and reveal strata of information.”

Standley applied this golden ratio during the construction process for his pieces Kismet and Phidala. Using phi as a guide for certain compositional decisions, Standley deviated from his typically strict mathematical rotations.

Standley’s solo exhibition Strata at Marta Hewett Gallery in Cincinnati, Oh contains both of these new phi-centered works, and continues through June 3, 2017. You can see more of the artist’s works on his website.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Phidala, detail. Cut paper, gold leaf, 24″ x 30″, 2017.

Kismet. Cut paper, wood and gold leaf, 24″ x 24″, 2017.

Kismet, detail. Cut paper, wood and gold leaf, 24″ x 24″, 2017.

Arch 6. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

Arch 6, detail. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

Arch 6, detail. Cut paper, watercolor, 24″ x 28″, 2016.

 

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Windows that Double as Accordion Fold Skylights and Glass-Bottom Balconies 

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More Sky,” a thesis project by architect Aldana Ferrer Garcia, gives those with cramped apartments the chance to spread out—out beyond the walls of one’s living space. The project merges a window, lounge, and skylight, surrounding users in natural light while providing a bit more space just outside their apartment’s confines.

Each of the concepts serves as a niche that can provide more access to natural light and nature within an urban environment. “Hopper Window” allows a nearly full recline, the owner able to glance up into the sky while resting against the accordion-like window. The second, “Casement Window,” is a small semi-circle protruding from the wall, giving a single person the ability to sit cross-legged while glancing out of the overhang. The third, “Awning Window,” is the smallest of the three, just enough room to lean against while glancing down at the world happening below.

The Argentinian architect seeks to address the lack of human scale often found in architecture, and recently completed her Masters of Industrial Design at the Pratt Institute. Her work has been featured in London Deign Week, Interior Design Magazine, Dwell, and The Woodworkers Journal. (via Lost at E Minor)

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Trompe-l’œil Window and Keyhole Illusions on the Streets of Istanbul by Pejac 

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Photo by Julian Santiago

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Spanish street artist Pejac (previously) just stopped by Istanbul where he painted three new trompe-l’œil pieces in the district of Uskudar titled Lock, Poster and Shutters. Painted with brushes, acrylic paint, pencils and sandpaper the works are located very close together are intended to represent the “perception and illusion of freedom.” He mentions the literal translation of Trompe l’oeil from French as “eye trap,” and says “in the case of these three windows, the trap works in both directions: from outside to inside and from inside to outside.”

You can follow Pejac’s most recent work on Instagram. (via Complex, StreetArtNews)

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Miniature Window Silhouettes Painted by ‘Pejac’ Interact with the Outside World 

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Early last month, Spanish artist Pejac (previously) created a fun silhouette artwork commemorating the 40th anniversary of French high-wire walker Philippe Petit’s daring walk between the Twin Towers in New York. In Pejac’s version, a tightrope walker painted in black acrylic on an interior window is shown walking along an airplane contrail several miles away in the sky. The fun optical illusion caught the attention of Sasha Bogojev over at Hi-Fructose who discovered the artist has been creating similar silhouette artworks since 2011. Seen here are a few of our favorites. Photos by Paco Esteve and Silvia Guinovart courtesy the artist. (via Hi-Fructose)

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A Couple Leaves their Jobs to Build a House of Windows in the Mountains of West Virginia 

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For their very first date, photographer Nick Olson took designer Lilah Horwitz on a walk in the mountains of West Virginia. While chatting and getting to know each other during a particularly scenic sunset the two jokingly wondered what it would be like to live in a house where the entire facade was windows, so the sunset would never be contained within a small space. Where most people would file the idea away as a dream or maybe an item at the bottom of a bucket list, the newly minted couple were a bit more aggressive. Less than a year later the two quit their jobs and embarked on a road trip starting in Pennsylvania to collect dozens of windows from garage sales and antique dealers. A few weeks later they arrived in West Virginia and built the glass cabin in the exact same spot where they envisioned it on their fist date.

Filmmakers Matt Glass and Jordan Wayne Long of Half Cut Tea caught up with Horwirz and Olson to learn more about the construction of the building and their unusually strong commitment to following through with their artistic visions.

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